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def all_primes(start,end):
    list_nonprimes = []
    list_primes = []

    for i in range(start,end):
        for a in range(2,i):
            if i % a == 1 and i not in list_nonprimes:
                if i not in list_primes:
                    list_primes.append(i)
            else:
                list_nonprimes.append(i)

    return list_primes

Why is this giving me an an incorrect output?

>>> all_primes(1,10)
[3,5,7,9]

How do I eliminate the 9?

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3  
2 is considered a prime too –  xbonez Nov 17 '12 at 5:33
1  
Why loop over range(2,i) when you already have a list of all of the primes less than i? –  Amber Nov 17 '12 at 5:38
    
Aside: you may be interested in learning about any and all. I think if not any(i % a == 0 for a in list_primes): list_primes.append(i) reads better than the for-else version, although YMMV. –  DSM Nov 17 '12 at 5:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's a more straightforward way to do this, since you're already inherently generating the list of primes less than the number you're currently checking:

def all_primes(start,end):
    list_primes = []

    for i in range(2,end):
        for a in list_primes:
            if i % a == 0:
                break
        else:
            list_primes.append(i)

    return [x for x in list_primes if x >= start]

Key to understanding this is knowing how the for...else construct works in Python. Essentially, a for loop can have an else statement, which is only executed if no break statement was run during the evaluation of the loop.

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I didn't know this thanks. Could you go over in more detail how to use the else in a for loop and what the last line of code does? –  Jacob Worldly Nov 17 '12 at 5:53
    
Sure. for...else is pretty much what was described - it's like a regular for loop, and then the else part is run if the for loop finishes without a break. The last line is what's called a list comprehension. –  Amber Nov 17 '12 at 8:11

I tried going over your code to see where you're going wrong, but ended up making quite some changes and optimizations. I've commented the code so hopefully it explains itself.

def all_primes(start,end):
    list_nonprimes = []
    list_primes = []

    for i in range(start,end):
        # if already present in non_primes, skip
        if i in list_nonprimes: continue

        # if already present in primes, skip
        if i in list_primes: continue

        # if 2, mark it as prime. Special case
        if i == 2 :
            list_primes.append(i)
            continue

        # even numbers are not prime
        if i%2 == 0: 
            list_nonprimes.append(i)
            continue

        # only check divisibility with odd numbers starting at 3
        # and ending at sqrt(i)
        for a in range(3,int(i**0,5)+1,2):
            if i % a == 0 :
                list_nonprimes.append(i)
                break

        # if we got here, and the number wasn;t added to non_primes
        # it must be a prime
        if i not in list_nonprimes: list_primes.append(i)            

    return list_primes

start = 2
end = 10
print all_primes(start, end)

Demo

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Change it from :

        if i % a == 1 and i not in list_nonprimes:
            if i not in list_primes:
                list_primes.append(i)
        else:
            list_nonprimes.append(i)

to:

        if i % a == 0 and i not in list_primes:
            if i not in list_nonprimes:
                list_nonprimes.append(i)
        else:
            list_primes.append(i)

Aside: You can also consider implementing Sieve of Eratosthenes instead. It's fairly straight forward to understand and much more efficient.

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1  
That doesn't seem right. all_primes(1, 10) now returns [4, 6, 8]. Perhaps 'if i % a != 0 ...'? –  threenplusone Nov 17 '12 at 5:36
    
@threenplusone, sry, I was still editing. You needed to swap your logic because i % a == 1 is only one possible condition for a non-prime. You should instead check to see if something IS a prime and eliminate it by checking if i % a == 0 –  sampson-chen Nov 17 '12 at 5:40

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