Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In user space, if I try to access a virtual address in kernel space, where exactly does the protection happen?

share|improve this question
    
how did you get that virtual address in the first place? –  arash kordi Nov 17 '12 at 9:58

1 Answer 1

User processes and kernels work on entirely different address space (except for the area where the kernel has to use when processing user process' system calls), the presumption that one can "try to access a virtual address in kernel space" is invalid.

share|improve this answer
    
I mean virtual address space. We know that user process occupies 0G-3G of virtual address space, and the kernel occupies 3G-4G.Let's say that in our own application, we try to call a function in kernel space directly instead of system call, what will happen? –  davenkin Nov 17 '12 at 13:10
    
@davenkin You're correct that user processes only occupy the first 3GB, but it's not because the kernel shares the same address space. Whenever a user process tries to access a location in the virtual memory, the memory manager will only look at the page table that is specific to that process. –  JosephH Nov 17 '12 at 20:06
    
Kernel code on the other hand, can look up any memory location that it wants. For example, when the kernel wants to look up the value in 0x400000 in process A, it will use the page table for process A to access that address from Kernel. Now if it wants to look up the value in 0x400000 in process B, it will use the page table for process B to access that address. The reason why that user processes only occupy the first 3GB is to avoid the location of the kernel being moved around whenever the kernel switches the page tables for each processes. I hope it's clearer now. –  JosephH Nov 17 '12 at 20:10
    
Thanks, your explanation is very clear. My question is not clear, my question is WHERE does the protection happen? We know that in protected mode the segmentation mechanism and the paging mechanism both offer protections. In segmentation, we have DPL/CPL/RPL to do the protection, and in user space, when we try to access a virtual address in kernel space, the CS register reamins the same, which means that the segmentation protection is not working, the protection actually happens in paging phase.Am I right? –  davenkin Nov 18 '12 at 8:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.