Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, so here is a code :

#include <sstream>

struct A {
    class Type {};
    template < typename Type >
    Type as( void ) {
        std::istringstream test;

        Type temp;
        test >> temp;

        return temp;
    }
};

It compiles fine, no problem at all.

Now, here is almost the same code :

#include <sstream>

struct A {
    class Type {};
    template < typename Type >
    inline Type as(void);
};

template < typename Type >
Type A::as( void ) {
    std::istringstream test;

    Type temp;
    test >> temp;

    return temp;
}

Boom, it doesn't compile anymore. Error :

t.cc:14:10: error: invalid operands to binary expression ('std::istringstream' (aka 'basic_istringstream<char>') and 'A::Type')
    test >> temp;
    ~~~~ ^  ~~~~

I have reproduced this behavior with clang and gcc.

Why are the compilers using the wrong type in the second case ? (just to be clear : I know that there is a conflict with the enumeration, but from my understanding, the first code should also fail to compile if it was the real problem)

share|improve this question
    
Fwiw, similar behavior on Apple LLVM 4.1 in both stdc++11 and gcc++11 modes. –  WhozCraig Nov 17 '12 at 7:43
    
i have downvoted this. please fix the code snippet so that they dont contain those copy paste bugs anymore and I will retract the vote. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 17 '12 at 11:51
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb Are you talking about the extra qualification warning ? I've removed it. –  Maël Nison Nov 17 '12 at 14:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The scope in A::as() uses A::Type as the type qualifier for temp. The easiest way to see this is to change to nested class name to something besides Type.

The better question is why it happens in the first place. It is related to point-of-declaration, name look-up, and name-hiding, all covered in sections 3.3, 3.4 and 14.6.4 of the standard. It is a pretty meaty set of sections and I'll post the specific clauses as they relate to this issue if/when i get the time to narrow them down. So far I'm leaning on 3.3.9-10 and 3.4

Anyway changing the class name allows the template argument to resolve once out of the scope of the struct declaration, the latter being key to why it happens in the first place (so I'm lead to believe by the standard, anyway).

struct A
{
    class TypeX {};
    template < typename Type >
    Type as(void);
};

template < typename Type >
inline Type A::as( void )
{
    std::istringstream test;
    Type temp;
    test >> temp;
    return temp;
}

I am very confident if I have the wrong sections of the standard relating to this issue there are ample occupants of StackOverflow that will send hot-rods through this answer.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.