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After figuring out that i cannot autobox my own type, I am still stuck needing a value that automatically adjusts itself upon assignment. Would this work, or would it simply freeze? If it won't, then help would be appreciated.

while(true){
    if(x){
        y=z
    }
}

NOTE: It might help if I explained my class better, so here goes: It is essentialy the same as an Integer, but it needs a max and a min value. I need so that when its value is > max, it starts back at min, and vice-versa. example:

LoopInteger i = new LoopInteger(0, 3, 0); //min, max, value
i.setValue(5); //When this is run, i need it to set the value to 1, as it is two more than the max of 3
i.setValue(-2); //The same here, except now it has to be set to 2, as it is two less than the min of 0.

basically, it's and unsigned it with configurable max at least.

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"... cannot autobox my own type", what do you mean? –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 17 '12 at 6:35
1  
Also this one "... value that automatically adjusts itself upon assignment.". –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 17 '12 at 6:38
    
autoboxing as in using UserDefinedClass = val and not UserDefinedClass = new UserDefinedClass(val), which i thought would allow me to overload '=', but java doesn't support that. –  Alpha M Cubed Nov 17 '12 at 7:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well you could make something like that work (sort of) provided that it is written like this:

volatile boolean x;
...
while (true) {
   if (x) {
       y = z;
       break;
   }
}

(Note that you need to either declare x as volatile or use synchronized synchronization for this thread to reliably see updates to x made by another thread.)

However, this is a bad way of implementing this. Essentially, a thread will be executing that loop continually until x is set to true. That is going to tie down one of your cores using a lot of your system's memory bandwidth ... and draining your machine's battery.

A better way to do this is to make x private, and write its setter to notify the other thread when the variable is updated.

Or better yet, implement whatever you are trying to do using events / event listeners, or one of java.util.concurrent classes. (It is hard to suggest which is best, because your example is too contrived ...)

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I'm a bit confused on how to make an event listener for variable change, if I use that. –  Alpha M Cubed Nov 17 '12 at 7:29
    
@user1825860 - You misunderstood. The variable change is made by calling the setter. The setter notes that the variable has actually changed, and calls the listener's callback to tell the litener that the "variable-has-changed" event has occurred. This approach requires that the variable is only ever changed by calling the setter method ... –  Stephen C Nov 17 '12 at 7:31
    
oh, that makes more sense! thanks. –  Alpha M Cubed Nov 17 '12 at 7:45

I don't see any termination condition for your loop, therefore it will keep looping. I think you can do one of the two as below:

  1. Using break:

     while(true){
       if(x){
          y=z;
          break;
       }
    }
    
  2. Using status flag:

     boolean found = false;
     while(!found){
       if(x){
          y=z;
          found = true;
       }
    }
    

Also I would advice to put some time interval withing the loop e.g. 100 millisecond (Thread.sleep(100)); otherwise it will continuously loop unit x condition is met.

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