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I've been developing an iPhone app, which handed by an experienced developer. I'm just an apprentice programmer and still struggling with practical Objective-C/iOS application development (I have learned Java and PHP on my own, but objective-c is nothing like these to me).

Our app is just another "web-centric" (I don't even know this word is appropriate...) app which heavily relies on server-side operations, making frequent http post request every single time (such as tracking user locations, send messages to another users etc.).

When I was assigned to develop this app, I saw in the code, that every single http request was written inside each method. Each request was done by dispatching another thread, and each action were written for those requests' response accordingly.

E.g.

-(void) methodA {  
// Making http request headers...  

// Dispatch another thread  
dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT , 0);  
dispatch_async(queue, ^{  
  // Send synchronous request and handle the response...  
});

}  

-(void) methodB {  
// Making http request headers...  

// Dispatch another thread  
dispatch_queue_t queue = dispatch_get_global_queue(DISPATCH_QUEUE_PRIORITY_DEFAULT , 0);  
dispatch_async(queue, ^{  
  // Send synchronous request and handle the response...  
});

}  

The codes like above are every where when the app needs to send request to the server.

I'm wondering, why he didn't create a class that handles http requests.
In Java, you could create a class that make synchronous request to the server:

public class ClassHttpRequest {
     public int makePost {  
        // Send synchronous request and return result...  
     }  
}  

Then make an instance of this class and execute it's instance method (in this case, makePost) inside a thread:

public class methodA {  

   Thread t = new Thread(new Runnable() {  
         public void run() {   
           public ClassHttpRequest requestHandler = new ClassHttpRequest();  
               if (success == requestHandler.makePost()) {  
                   // Handle response...  
               }  
           }  
         }  
     });

    t.start();  
 }  

Is there any performance penalty or issues in creating a class and let it handles frequent http request in Objective-C? Or, it's just simply not "recommended" or something? I have heard that, in Objective-C, it is not common to use try-catch statement for exception handling, because it would consume much resources. I do have read several iOS and Objective-C books (and googled), but such kind of "practical" answer for real application development is hard to find, most of the time it's rather confusing to beginners like me.

I should ask him why he didn't create a such class, but he's away now and I couldn't get in touch with him. Also, I belive that the professionals here in stackoverflow can provide me much more accurate and concise solutions than my predecessor. (I have asked several questions and already got what I wanted to know.)

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
Usually I prefer to keep these http requests in a separate class as HttpRequestManager and use it there, rather than putting everything in all the methods. I dont think there are any performance issues with that. –  iDev Nov 17 '12 at 7:54
    
not common to use try-catch statement ... consume much resources - true, actually you can work without exception, exception is just a high level concept. –  nhahtdh Nov 17 '12 at 7:58
    
@ACB Yes, that's what I always do in Java, and that led me to ask this question here. As I said, I'm just an apprentice programmer, but the developer who wrote this code is an experienced developer. So I needed the professionals' thoughts on why he wrote it like this. –  Faust V Nov 17 '12 at 11:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Normal rules of object-oriented design apply: if it makes sense to represent a HTTP request as a tangible object - in particular, there's a bunch of boilerplate code that's necessary and would otherwise be copy-pasted - then it's probably a good idea to use a class. Otherwise, there's no need. Though in this specific case, is there a reason you're not just using the standard, asynchronous system APIs - NSURLRequest, NSURLConnection, NSURLDownload, etc?

@try/@catch are by definition used for exception handling, and should be used as necessary. If you skimp on them your code may fail in unnecessarily interesting ways (e.g. leaving locks dangling) or to unnecessarily degrees (e.g. crashing completely instead of simply failing a specific operation). What you shouldn't do is use them for flow control - unlike other languages, Objective-C exceptions are for programmer errors, "impossible" conditions, and other such events. Unfortunately a lot of existing Objective-C code is not exception-safe, so while you should utilise them you shouldn't rely on them.

They're not particularly expensive in any of the runtimes you're likely to use these days - the @try is very cheap, almost free. Only if an exception is thrown is there any significant work done, and since you should only be seeing them in very bad situations - i.e. not frequently - the performance cost is irrelevant.

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He probably does use NSURLConnection and friends, the code is just hidden inside the commented-out body of dispatch_async. –  zoul Nov 17 '12 at 8:36
    
Possibly. But that would beg the question of why the dispatch_async is necessary, since those APIs are non-blocking anyway. It could be that the OP is using some other API for the actual requests. –  Wade Tregaskis Nov 17 '12 at 8:52
    
I prefer the synchronous NSURLConnection mode, too, since it’s much simpler than the asynchronous mode with callbacks. –  zoul Nov 17 '12 at 8:54
    
@Wade Tregaskis Thank you for concise explanation! As zoul pointed out, the code has NSURLConnection with sendSynchronousRequest inside dispatch_async, and just handling returned JSON with NSData. So actually it's a matter of clarity rather than performance...? Since the app's size are becoming larger than expected, I should better make a class for this. As for try-catch, I will keep in mind that I shall not use them as flow-control. And thank you all for great insights! Your opinions are so valuable to the people like me! –  Faust V Nov 17 '12 at 12:11

Refactoring the code is a question of balance. The current code is verbose and a bit repeating, but refactoring it into a separate class will introduce a new indirection, an intermediate API. It’s probably worth it if the new API has a decent semantics, like if you can create a SomeNetworkService class with methods like postStatus, listItems and such. The interface should be asynchronous, something like this:

typedef void (^StatusCompletionBlock)(BOOL success, NSError *error);
- (void) postStatus: (NSString*) status withCompletion: (StatusCompletionBlock) completion;

This should make the code more readable, more DRY and even more testable, since you can replace the whole SomeNetworkService object with a stub. So that would be certainly worth it.

The performance hit of sending one extra message is not worth mentioning. Generally speaking, people worry about performance too much. If you can sacrifice performance for better readability, 99 times out of 100 it’s worth it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for great idea! Probably I should try this way when refactoring the whole app, because our SRS is growing. If I could mark multiple answers accepted... because as I said, every opinion from professional is so valuable to the apprentice like me. And thank you for editing! I'm still not quite used to writing post in stackoverflow. –  Faust V Nov 17 '12 at 12:32

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