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According to MSDN, Median is not available as an aggregate function in Transact-Sql. However, I would like to find out whether it is possible to create this functionality (using the Create Aggregate function, user defined function, or some other method).

What would be the best way (if possible) to do this - allow for the calculation of a median value (assuming a numeric data type) in an aggregate query?

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18 Answers

up vote 57 down vote accepted

There are lots of ways to do this, with dramtically varying performance. Here's one particularly well-optimized solution, from http://sqlblog.com/blogs/adam_machanic/archive/2006/12/18/medians-row-numbers-and-performance.aspx. This is a particuarly optimal soluton when it comes to actual I/Os generated during execution-- it looks more costly than other solutions but is actually much faster.

That page also contains a discussion of other solutions and perf testing details. Note the use of a unique column as a disambiguator in case there are multiple rows with the same value of the median column.

As with all database performance scenarios, always try to test a solution out with real data on real hardware-- you never know when a change to SQL Server's optimizer or a peculiarity in your environment will make a normally-speedy solution slower.

SELECT
   CustomerId,
   AVG(TotalDue)
FROM
(
   SELECT
      CustomerId,
      TotalDue,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
         PARTITION BY CustomerId 
         ORDER BY TotalDue ASC, SalesOrderId ASC) AS RowAsc,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (
         PARTITION BY CustomerId 
         ORDER BY TotalDue DESC, SalesOrderId DESC) AS RowDesc
   FROM Sales.SalesOrderHeader SOH
) x
WHERE 
   RowAsc IN (RowDesc, RowDesc - 1, RowDesc + 1)
GROUP BY CustomerId
ORDER BY CustomerId;
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3  
I don't think this works if you have dupes, particularly a lot of dupes, in your data. You can't guarantee the row_numbers will line up. You can get some really crazy answers for your median, or even worse, no median at all. –  Jonathan Beerhalter Oct 5 '10 at 23:58
7  
That's why having a disambiguator (SalesOrderId in the code example above) is important, so you can ensure that the order of result-set rows is consistent both backwards and forwards. Often a unique primary key makes an ideal disambiguator because it's available without a separate index lookup. If there's no disambiguation column available (for example, if the table has no uniquifying key), then another approach must be used to calculate median, because as you correctly point out, if you can't guarantee that DESC row numbers are mirror images of ASC row numbers, then results are unpredictable. –  Justin Grant Oct 6 '10 at 18:24
1  
Thanks, when switching the columns to my DB, I dropped the disambiguator, thinking it wasn't relevant. In that case, this solution works really really well. –  Jonathan Beerhalter Oct 10 '10 at 3:10
4  
I suggest adding a comment to the code itself, describing the need for the disambiguator. –  hoffmanc May 23 '12 at 14:27
    
Awesome! long have i known its importance but now i can give it a name... the disambiguator! Thank you Justin! –  Jepa Dec 19 '13 at 15:56
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If you're using SQL 2005 or better this is a nice, simple-ish median calculation for a single column in a table:

SELECT
(
 (SELECT MAX(Score) FROM
   (SELECT TOP 50 PERCENT Score FROM Posts ORDER BY Score) AS BottomHalf)
 +
 (SELECT MIN(Score) FROM
   (SELECT TOP 50 PERCENT Score FROM Posts ORDER BY Score DESC) AS TopHalf)
) / 2 AS Median
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12  
That's clever, and relatively simple given that there exists no Median() aggregate function. But how is it that no Median() function exists!? I'm a bit FLOOR()ed, frankly. –  Charlie Kilian Jan 31 '12 at 19:42
    
Well, nice and simple, but usualy you need median per certain group category, i.e. like select gid, median(score) from T group by gid. Do you need a correlated subquery for that? –  TMS Jul 1 '13 at 12:01
1  
... I mean like in this case (the 2nd query named "Users with highest median answer score"). –  TMS Jul 1 '13 at 13:02
    
Tomas - did you manage to solve your "per certain group category" issue plese? As I have the same problem. Thanks. –  Stu Harper Dec 13 '13 at 11:37
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My original quick answer was:

select  max(my_column) as [my_column], quartile
from    (select my_column, ntile(4) over (order by my_column) as [quartile]
         from   my_table) i
--where quartile = 2
group by quartile

This will give you the median and interquartile range in one fell swoop. If you really only want one row that is the median then uncomment the where clause.

When you stick that into an explain plan, 60% of the work is sorting the data which is unavoidable when calculating position dependent statistics like this.

I've amended the answer to follow the excellent suggestion from Robert Ševčík-Robajz in the comments below:

;with PartitionedData as
  (select my_column, ntile(10) over (order by my_column) as [percentile]
   from   my_table),
MinimaAndMaxima as
  (select  min(my_column) as [low], max(my_column) as [high], percentile
   from    PartitionedData
   group by percentile)
select
  case
    when b.percentile = 10 then cast(b.high as decimal(18,2))
    else cast((a.low + b.high)  as decimal(18,2)) / 2
  end as [value], --b.high, a.low,
  b.percentile
from    MinimaAndMaxima a
  join  MinimaAndMaxima b on (a.percentile -1 = b.percentile) or (a.percentile = 10 and b.percentile = 10)
--where b.percentile = 5

This should calculate the correct median and percentile values when you have an even number of data items. Again, uncomment the final where clause if you only want the median and not the entire percentile distribution.

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1  
This actually works pretty well, and allows for partitioning of the data. –  Jonathan Beerhalter Oct 6 '10 at 0:26
2  
If it's OK to be off by one, then the query above is fine. But if you need the exact median, then you will have trouble. For example, for the sequence (1,3,5,7) the median is 4 but the query above returns 3. For (1,2,3,503,603,703) the median is 258 but the query above returns 503. –  Justin Grant Oct 30 '12 at 6:12
1  
You could fix the flaw of imprecision by taking max and min of each quartile in a subquery, then AVGing the MAX of the previous and MIN of the next? –  Robert Ševčík - Robajz Jul 23 '13 at 14:31
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In SQL Server 2012 you should use PERCENTILE_CONT:

SELECT SalesOrderID, OrderQty,
    PERCENTILE_CONT(0.5) 
        WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY OrderQty)
        OVER (PARTITION BY SalesOrderID) AS MedianCont
FROM Sales.SalesOrderDetail
WHERE SalesOrderID IN (43670, 43669, 43667, 43663)
ORDER BY SalesOrderID DESC

See also : http://blog.sqlauthority.com/2011/11/20/sql-server-introduction-to-percentile_cont-analytic-functions-introduced-in-sql-server-2012/

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Even better:

SELECT @Median = AVG(1.0 * val)
FROM
(
    SELECT o.val, rn = ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY o.val), c.c
    FROM dbo.EvenRows AS o
    CROSS JOIN (SELECT c = COUNT(*) FROM dbo.EvenRows) AS c
) AS x
WHERE rn IN ((c + 1)/2, (c + 2)/2);

From the master Himself, Bertrand!

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I just came across this page while looking for a set based solution to median. After looking at some of the solutions here, I came up with the following. Hope is helps/works.

DECLARE @test TABLE(
    i int identity(1,1),
    id int,
    score float
)

INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (1,10)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (1,11)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (1,15)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (1,19)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (1,20)

INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (2,20)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (2,21)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (2,25)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (2,29)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (2,30)

INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (3,20)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (3,21)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (3,25)
INSERT INTO @test (id,score) VALUES (3,29)

DECLARE @counts TABLE(
    id int,
    cnt int
)

INSERT INTO @counts (
    id,
    cnt
)
SELECT
    id,
    COUNT(*)
FROM
    @test
GROUP BY
    id

SELECT
    drv.id,
    drv.start,
    AVG(t.score)
FROM
    (
        SELECT
            MIN(t.i)-1 AS start,
            t.id
        FROM
            @test t
        GROUP BY
            t.id
    ) drv
    INNER JOIN @test t ON drv.id = t.id
    INNER JOIN @counts c ON t.id = c.id
WHERE
    t.i = ((c.cnt+1)/2)+drv.start
    OR (
        t.i = (((c.cnt+1)%2) * ((c.cnt+2)/2))+drv.start
        AND ((c.cnt+1)%2) * ((c.cnt+2)/2) <> 0
    )
GROUP BY
    drv.id,
    drv.start
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In a UDF , write

Select Top 1 medianSortColumn from Table T
  Where (Select Count(*) from Table 
         Where MedianSortColumn < 
      (Select Count(*) From Table) / 2)
  Order By medianSortColumn
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2  
In case of an even number of items, the median is the average of the two middle items, which is not covered by this UDF. –  Yaakov Ellis Aug 27 '09 at 18:46
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See other solutions for median calculation in SQL here: "Simple way to calculate median with MySQL" (the solutions are mostly vendor-independent).

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Marked as CW so I don't get points for merely linking. :) –  Bill Karwin Aug 27 '09 at 18:33
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Although Justin grant's solution appears solid I found that when you have a number of duplicate values within a given partition key the row numbers for the ASC duplicate values end up out of sequence so they do not properly align.

Here is a fragment from my result:

KEY VALUE ROWA ROWD

13  2   22  182
13  1   6   183
13  1   7   184
13  1   8   185
13  1   9   186
13  1   10  187
13  1   11  188
13  1   12  189
13  0   1   190
13  0   2   191
13  0   3   192
13  0   4   193
13  0   5   194

I used Justin's code as the basis for this solution. Although not as efficient given the use of multiple derived tables it does resolve the row ordering problem I encountered. Any improvements would be welcome as I am not that experienced in T-SQL.

SELECT PKEY, cast(AVG(VALUE)as decimal(5,2)) as MEDIANVALUE
FROM
(
  SELECT PKEY,VALUE,ROWA,ROWD,
  'FLAG' = (CASE WHEN ROWA IN (ROWD,ROWD-1,ROWD+1) THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
  FROM
  (
    SELECT
    PKEY,
    cast(VALUE as decimal(5,2)) as VALUE,
    ROWA,
    ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY PKEY ORDER BY ROWA DESC) as ROWD 

    FROM
    (
      SELECT
      PKEY, 
      VALUE,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY PKEY ORDER BY VALUE ASC,PKEY ASC ) as ROWA 
      FROM [MTEST]
    )T1
  )T2
)T3
WHERE FLAG = '1'
GROUP BY PKEY
ORDER BY PKEY
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Simple, fast, accurate

SELECT x.Amount 
FROM   (SELECT amount, 
               Count(1) OVER (partition BY 'A')        AS TotalRows, 
               Row_number() OVER (ORDER BY Amount ASC) AS AmountOrder 
        FROM   facttransaction ft) x 
WHERE  x.AmountOrder = Round(x.TotalRows / 2.0, 0)  
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There is some good info here on statistics using Transact-SQL.

They suggest the following approach:

SELECT x.Hours median
FROM BulbLife x, BulbLife y
GROUP BY x.Hours
HAVING 
   SUM(CASE WHEN y.Hours <= x.Hours 
      THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)>=(COUNT(*)+1)/2 AND
   SUM(CASE WHEN y.Hours >= x.Hours 
      THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)>=(COUNT(*)/2)+1

It also provides a solution for the financial median: in the case when there is an even number of records, so no "true" median, it will return the average of the inner two records.

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I wanted to work out a solution by myself, but my brain tripped and fell on the way. I think it works, but don't ask me to explain it in the morning. :P

DECLARE @table AS TABLE
(
    Number int not null
);

insert into @table select 2;
insert into @table select 4;
insert into @table select 9;
insert into @table select 15;
insert into @table select 22;
insert into @table select 26;
insert into @table select 37;
insert into @table select 49;

DECLARE @Count AS INT
SELECT @Count = COUNT(*) FROM @table;

WITH MyResults(RowNo, Number) AS
(
    SELECT RowNo, Number FROM
    	(SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY Number) AS RowNo, Number FROM @table) AS Foo
)
SELECT AVG(Number) FROM MyResults WHERE RowNo = (@Count+1)/2 OR RowNo = ((@Count+1)%2) * ((@Count+2)/2)
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--Create Temp Table to Store Results in
DECLARE @results AS TABLE 
(
    [Month] datetime not null
 ,[Median] int not null
);

--This variable will determine the date
DECLARE @IntDate as int 
set @IntDate = -13


WHILE (@IntDate < 0) 
BEGIN

--Create Temp Table
DECLARE @table AS TABLE 
(
    [Rank] int not null
 ,[Days Open] int not null
);

--Insert records into Temp Table
insert into @table 

SELECT 
    rank() OVER (ORDER BY DATEADD(mm, DATEDIFF(mm, 0, DATEADD(ss, SVR.close_date, '1970')), 0), DATEDIFF(day,DATEADD(ss, SVR.open_date, '1970'),DATEADD(ss, SVR.close_date, '1970')),[SVR].[ref_num]) as [Rank]
 ,DATEDIFF(day,DATEADD(ss, SVR.open_date, '1970'),DATEADD(ss, SVR.close_date, '1970')) as [Days Open]
FROM
 mdbrpt.dbo.View_Request SVR
 LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.dtv_apps_systems vapp 
 on SVR.category = vapp.persid
 LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.prob_ctg pctg 
 on SVR.category = pctg.persid
 Left Outer Join [mdbrpt].[dbo].[rootcause] as [Root Cause] 
 on [SVR].[rootcause]=[Root Cause].[id]
 Left Outer Join [mdbrpt].[dbo].[cr_stat] as [Status]
 on [SVR].[status]=[Status].[code]
 LEFT OUTER JOIN [mdbrpt].[dbo].[net_res] as [net] 
 on [net].[id]=SVR.[affected_rc]
WHERE
 SVR.Type IN ('P') 
 AND
 SVR.close_date IS NOT NULL 
 AND
 [Status].[SYM] = 'Closed'
 AND
 SVR.parent is null
 AND
 [Root Cause].[sym] in ( 'RC - Application','RC - Hardware', 'RC - Operational', 'RC - Unknown')
 AND
 (
  [vapp].[appl_name] in ('3PI','Billing Rpts/Files','Collabrent','Reports','STMS','STMS 2','Telco','Comergent','OOM','C3-BAU','C3-DD','DIRECTV','DIRECTV Sales','DIRECTV Self Care','Dealer Website','EI Servlet','Enterprise Integration','ET','ICAN','ODS','SB-SCM','SeeBeyond','Digital Dashboard','IVR','OMS','Order Services','Retail Services','OSCAR','SAP','CTI','RIO','RIO Call Center','RIO Field Services','FSS-RIO3','TAOS','TCS')
 OR
  pctg.sym in ('Systems.Release Health Dashboard.Problem','DTV QA Test.Enterprise Release.Deferred Defect Log')
 AND  
  [Net].[nr_desc] in ('3PI','Billing Rpts/Files','Collabrent','Reports','STMS','STMS 2','Telco','Comergent','OOM','C3-BAU','C3-DD','DIRECTV','DIRECTV Sales','DIRECTV Self Care','Dealer Website','EI Servlet','Enterprise Integration','ET','ICAN','ODS','SB-SCM','SeeBeyond','Digital Dashboard','IVR','OMS','Order Services','Retail Services','OSCAR','SAP','CTI','RIO','RIO Call Center','RIO Field Services','FSS-RIO3','TAOS','TCS')
 )
 AND
 DATEADD(mm, DATEDIFF(mm, 0, DATEADD(ss, SVR.close_date, '1970')), 0) = DATEADD(mm, DATEDIFF(mm,0,DATEADD(mm,@IntDate,getdate())), 0)
ORDER BY [Days Open]



DECLARE @Count AS INT
SELECT @Count = COUNT(*) FROM @table;

WITH MyResults(RowNo, [Days Open]) AS
(
    SELECT RowNo, [Days Open] FROM
        (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY [Days Open]) AS RowNo, [Days Open] FROM @table) AS Foo
)


insert into @results
SELECT 
 DATEADD(mm, DATEDIFF(mm,0,DATEADD(mm,@IntDate,getdate())), 0) as [Month]
 ,AVG([Days Open])as [Median] FROM MyResults WHERE RowNo = (@Count+1)/2 OR RowNo = ((@Count+1)%2) * ((@Count+2)/2) 


set @IntDate = @IntDate+1
DELETE FROM @table
END

select *
from @results
order by [Month]
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This works with SQL 2000:

DECLARE @testTable TABLE 
( 
    VALUE   INT
)
--INSERT INTO @testTable -- Even Test
--SELECT 3 UNION ALL
--SELECT 5 UNION ALL
--SELECT 7 UNION ALL
--SELECT 12 UNION ALL
--SELECT 13 UNION ALL
--SELECT 14 UNION ALL
--SELECT 21 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 29 UNION ALL
--SELECT 40 UNION ALL
--SELECT 56

--
--INSERT INTO @testTable -- Odd Test
--SELECT 3 UNION ALL
--SELECT 5 UNION ALL
--SELECT 7 UNION ALL
--SELECT 12 UNION ALL
--SELECT 13 UNION ALL
--SELECT 14 UNION ALL
--SELECT 21 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 23 UNION ALL
--SELECT 29 UNION ALL
--SELECT 39 UNION ALL
--SELECT 40 UNION ALL
--SELECT 56


DECLARE @RowAsc TABLE
(
    ID      INT IDENTITY,
    Amount  INT
)

INSERT INTO @RowAsc
SELECT  VALUE 
FROM    @testTable 
ORDER BY VALUE ASC

SELECT  AVG(amount)
FROM @RowAsc ra
WHERE ra.id IN
(
    SELECT  ID 
    FROM    @RowAsc
    WHERE   ra.id -
    (
        SELECT  MAX(id) / 2.0 
        FROM    @RowAsc
    ) BETWEEN 0 AND 1

)
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I've created a function to do exactly what you want through an assembly. I've got a heap of SQL Math functions. It isn't free, but it does give you the median as an aggregate function. The description of the median function I wrote is here: http://www.sqladmintools.com/statistics.aspx

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If you want to use the Create Aggregate function in SQL Server, this is how to do it. Doing it this way has the benefit of being able to write clean queries. Note this this process could be adapted to calculate a Percentile value fairly easily.

Create a new Visual Studio project and set the target framework to .NET 3.5 (this is for SQL 2008, it may be different in SQL 2012). Then create a class file and put in the following code, or c# equivalent:

Imports Microsoft.SqlServer.Server
Imports System.Data.SqlTypes
Imports System.IO

<Serializable>
<SqlUserDefinedAggregate(Format.UserDefined, IsInvariantToNulls:=True, IsInvariantToDuplicates:=False, _
  IsInvariantToOrder:=True, MaxByteSize:=-1, IsNullIfEmpty:=True)>
Public Class Median
  Implements IBinarySerialize
  Private _items As List(Of Decimal)

  Public Sub Init()
    _items = New List(Of Decimal)()
  End Sub

  Public Sub Accumulate(value As SqlDecimal)
    If Not value.IsNull Then
      _items.Add(value.Value)
    End If
  End Sub

  Public Sub Merge(other As Median)
    If other._items IsNot Nothing Then
      _items.AddRange(other._items)
    End If
  End Sub

  Public Function Terminate() As SqlDecimal
    If _items.Count <> 0 Then
      Dim result As Decimal
      _items = _items.OrderBy(Function(i) i).ToList()
      If _items.Count Mod 2 = 0 Then
        result = ((_items((_items.Count / 2) - 1)) + (_items(_items.Count / 2))) / 2@
      Else
        result = _items((_items.Count - 1) / 2)
      End If

      Return New SqlDecimal(result)
    Else
      Return New SqlDecimal()
    End If
  End Function

  Public Sub Read(r As BinaryReader) Implements IBinarySerialize.Read
    'deserialize it from a string
    Dim list = r.ReadString()
    _items = New List(Of Decimal)

    For Each value In list.Split(","c)
      Dim number As Decimal
      If Decimal.TryParse(value, number) Then
        _items.Add(number)
      End If
    Next

  End Sub

  Public Sub Write(w As BinaryWriter) Implements IBinarySerialize.Write
    'serialize the list to a string
    Dim list = ""

    For Each item In _items
      If list <> "" Then
        list += ","
      End If      
      list += item.ToString()
    Next
    w.Write(list)
  End Sub
End Class

Then compile it and copy the DLL and PDB file to your SQL Server machine and run the following command in SQL Server:

CREATE ASSEMBLY CustomAggregate FROM '{path to your DLL}'
WITH PERMISSION_SET=SAFE;
GO

CREATE AGGREGATE Median(@value decimal(9, 3))
RETURNS decimal(9, 3) 
EXTERNAL NAME [CustomAggregate].[{namespace of your DLL}.Median];
GO

You can then write a query to calculate the median like this: SELECT dbo.Median(Field) FROM Table

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For newbies like myself who are learning the very basics, I personally find this example easier to follow, as it is easier to understand exactly what's happening and where median values are coming from...

select
 ( max(a.[Value1]) + min(a.[Value1]) ) / 2 as [Median Value1]
,( max(a.[Value2]) + min(a.[Value2]) ) / 2 as [Median Value2]

from (select
    datediff(dd,startdate,enddate) as [Value1]
    ,xxxxxxxxxxxxxx as [Value2]
     from dbo.table1
     )a

In absolute awe of some of the codes above though!!!

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This is as simple an answer as I could come up with. Worked well with my data. If you want to exclude certain values just add a where clause to the inner select.

SELECT TOP 1 
    ValueField AS MedianValue
FROM
    (SELECT TOP(SELECT COUNT(1)/2 FROM tTABLE)
        ValueField
    FROM 
        tTABLE
    ORDER BY 
        ValueField) A
ORDER BY
    ValueField DESC
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