Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've seen that in some projects, Module Pattern uses instead of Singleton Pattern and vice versa.

I want to know exactly, what's the different between Module Pattern and Singleton Pattern?

share|improve this question
3  
Please take a look at this: addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/… –  Teemu Nov 17 '12 at 9:15
    
@Teemu This is a good document but it's not clarify the different between those. –  Afshin Mehrabani Nov 17 '12 at 10:30
    
different names or implementations for nonsense? –  L̲̳o̲̳̳n̲̳̳g̲̳̳p̲̳o̲̳̳k̲̳̳e̲̳̳ Nov 17 '12 at 15:56
    
@Longpoke Implementation. –  Afshin Mehrabani Nov 17 '12 at 16:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Module pattern in javascript refers to the modularisation of code for a common mechanism. It works quite well to split one "class" across several files as you can define constructor and various groups of prototype methods independently. Each of the modules is usually wrapped inside a closure to create static, local variables - this is called revealing module pattern.

Singleton pattern in javascript refers to the restriction of instance creations, often using lazy initialisation.

Of course you can consider the module pattern to be a specialisation of the singleton pattern (see the Wikipedia article), the constructor and its prototype object would take the part of the "single instance" then.

Yet you also could combine them "independently": A module that defines a class which uses the singleton approach.

share|improve this answer
1  
So, is that correct to use Module Pattern as a Singleton Pattern? –  Afshin Mehrabani Nov 17 '12 at 14:33
1  
Sure, you can also have a module that just creates one singleton object, without any classes at all (the more prototypical approach) –  Bergi Nov 17 '12 at 14:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.