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For example:

{datetime.date(2000, 1, 15): [1],
 datetime.date(2000, 1, 14): [5],
 datetime.date(2000, 1, 3): [4],
 datetime.date(2005, 1, 10): [2],
 datetime.date(2005, 1, 16): [4],
 datetime.date(2005, 1, 5): [2]}

to just:

{(2000, 1): [10], (2005,1): [8]}

basically omitting the day, and adding the values. I can't seem to figure out how to remove datetime.date.

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4  
Why are your values in an array? E.g. [2] instead of 2. –  Georg Schölly Nov 17 '12 at 9:36
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"one-line"r:

newdict = {
    (key.year, key.month): sum(
        v[0] for k, v in olddict.iteritems()
        if (key.year, key.month) == (k.year, k.month)
    )
    for key in olddict
}
>>> newdict
{(2000, 1): 10, (2005, 1): 8}

This might be a little less efficient than 0605002's answer.


Or a more conventional solution:

from collections import defaultdict

newdict = defaultdict(lambda: [0])
for key in olddict:
    newdict[(key.year, key.month)][0] += olddict[key][0]
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Does newdict = defaultdict(lambda: [0]) mean that [0] will be the default value against any (even non-existent) key in newdict? –  0605002 Nov 17 '12 at 10:26
    
@0605002: Exactly –  Eric Nov 17 '12 at 10:26
    
Ah, python keeps me amusing and this amusement never ends :) –  0605002 Nov 17 '12 at 10:27
    
Since your first solution uses a dictionary comprehension, the result could be immediate assigned back to olddict virtually making it an in-place operation. –  martineau Nov 17 '12 at 12:39
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Simple:

for key in olddict:
    if (key.year, key.month) in newdict:
        newdict[(key.year, key.month)][0] += olddict[key][0]
    else:
        newdict[(key.year, key.month)] = [olddict[key][0]]

Learn more about datetime objects from python docs.

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You should prefer (key.year, key.month) in newdict over newdict.has_key((key.year, key.month)) –  Eric Nov 17 '12 at 9:45
    
Yeah, right you are! –  0605002 Nov 17 '12 at 9:53
    
defaultdict(lambda: [0]) might be useful here –  Eric Nov 17 '12 at 9:55
    
Actually I know very little about defaultdict, I always use the basic tools python provides. –  0605002 Nov 17 '12 at 10:18
    
See the edit to my answer for how defaultdict helps here –  Eric Nov 17 '12 at 10:22
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