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I have a web application that uses linq-to-sql queries (will soon be upgraded to linq-to-EF compiled queries) and for which there's data context and a database already in place. I want to create a demo version of the application and for the demo, I want to use an entirely different database file but that will have the same tables. So in essence, I'll have the same data structure for two different databases: one database for logged-in users and one database for demo users. I want to reuse many of the queries I've already written; they look like this:

 public class FruitQueries
 {
        public List<SomeObjectModel> MyQuery(list of parameters)
        {
           using (MyDataContext TheDC = new MyDataContext())
           {
              var TheQueryResult = (from f in TheDC.Fruits
                                    ......).ToList();

              return TheQueryResult;
           }
        }

        public List<SomeObject> AnotherQuery(some other parameters) {...}
 }

Now I think I know that this calls for dependency injection where the data context is passed in as a parameter but I'm not sure on the syntax. How do you reuse queries using dependency injection to make them work on two different databases? Right now I'm using a using statement and I want to keep this pattern; is that possible if I inject the DC as a parameter?

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you already have a lot of code in place, probably the simplest thing to do is to inject a factory:

public interface IMyDataContextFactory
{
    MyDataContext CreateNewContext();
}

All the code will roughly stay the same:

public List<SomeObjectModel> MyQuery(params)
{
   using (var TheDC = this.factory.CreateNewContext())
   {
      var TheQueryResult = (from f in TheDC.Fruits
                            ......).ToList();

      return TheQueryResult;
   }
}

You can let the injected IMyDataContextFactory decide how to construct a MyDataContext instance (based on the user). This would be trivial.

In the end it will probably be better to inject a MyDataContext (or an abstraction such as IUnitOfWork) into consumers, but this changes everything completely. Since this class is passed in from the outside, the consumer isn't responsible anymore for disposing it, but someone else is. Although disposing such instance isn't that hard with most DI container. It gets harder though when you want to share the same MyDataContext instance over multiple consumers (within the same web request for instance) and where do you call SubmitChanges?

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I like the concept! All the queries are held in several classes, based on what kind of query they are (see edit). How would I wire up a factory inside each class? –  frenchie Nov 17 '12 at 13:02
    
Since you tagged your question with 'dependency-injection', I would say to go with constructor injection. Since you are talking about having queries in classes, take a look at this article. It shows an interesting and maintainable way of defining queries. –  Steven Nov 17 '12 at 13:12
    
@Steven what would you say of "injecting" the connectionstring instead of the entire DC? –  Pleun Nov 17 '12 at 13:30
    
@Pleun: When you do that, each query class would be responsible of creating its own MyDataContext, which isn't the responsibility of that type. This can lead to maintainability problems in the future when you need to create MyDataContext in another way. For instance because you need to set an extra property, want to run them in a open connection, or as part of a bigger transaction. In other words, it is a bad idea to inject the connection string. There should only be one single class (or at most a few) in which you inject that same connection string. –  Steven Nov 17 '12 at 13:47
    
Given that each class is now already responsible for doing exacly that and OP states that the using statement should be kept, it would be the quickest way to solve the problem –  Pleun Nov 17 '12 at 14:15
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Elaborating the previous answer

What you can do, is provide the connectionstring to the DC (would this qualify as contructor injection?)

using (MyDataContext TheDC = new MyDataContext(this.factory.CreateConString()))

This way, disposal is still handled by the consumer and you can continue your Using() approach. Your factory can read the two different connectionstrings from your webconfig and determine the right one to use, based on the user. (not that trivial as it may seem)

PS: I think the quickest way is to deploy the demo application to a different URL so they can have a separate web.config and you do not need to code anything but that does not answer your question.

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Deploying the demo application on a serapate IIS application with its own web.config is a good idea, since this is gives you an extra layer of security. There's no way that demo users can access the production database in that case. –  Steven Nov 17 '12 at 13:49
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