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I have a database table like this:

Entity
---------------------
ID        int      PK
ParentID  int      FK
Code      varchar
Text      text

The ParentID field is a foreign key with another record in the same table (recursive). So the structure represents a Tree.

I'm trying to write a method to query this table and get 1 specific Entity based on a path. A path would be a string representing the Code properties of the Entity and the parent Entities. So an example path would be "foo/bar/baz" which means the one specific Entity of which the Code == "baz", the parent's Code == "bar" and the parent of the parent's Code == "foo".

My attempt:

public Entity Single(string path)
{
 string[] pathParts = path.Split('/');
 string code = pathParts[pathParts.Length -1];

 if (pathParts.Length == 1)
  return dataContext.Entities.Single(e => e.Code == code && e.ParentID == 0);

 IQueryable<Entity> entities = dataContext.Entities.Where(e => e.Code == code);
 for (int i = pathParts.Length - 2; i >= 0; i--)
 {
  string parentCode = pathParts[i];
  entities = entities.Where(e => e.Entity1.Code == parentCode); // incorrect
 }

 return entities.Single();
}

I know this isn't correct because the Where inside the forloop just adds more conditions to the current Entity instead of the parent Entity, but how do I correct this? In words I would like the for-loop to say "and the parent's code must be x and the parent of that parent's code must be y, and the parent of that parent of that parent's code must be z .... etc". Besides that, for performance reasons I'd like it to be one IQueryable so there will be just 1 query going to the database.

share|improve this question
    
I think you should start from the root. Find the root entity and then from the entities that have parentId == rootId find the one with the specified code. Then recursively continue with the next part of the path. –  Panos Rontogiannis Nov 17 '12 at 11:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

How to formulate an IQueryable to query a recursive database table? I'd like it to be one IQueryable so there will be just 1 query going to the database.

I don't think traversing an hierarchical table using a single translated query is currently possible with Entity Framework. The reason is you'll need to implement either a loop or recursion and to my best knowledge neither can be translated into an EF object store query.

UPDATE

@Bazzz and @Steven got me thinking and I have to admit I was completely wrong: it is possible and quite easy to construct an IQueryable for these requirements dynamically.

The following function can be called recursively to build up the query:

public static IQueryable<TestTree> Traverse(this IQueryable<TestTree> source, IQueryable<TestTree> table, LinkedList<string> parts)
{
    var code = parts.First.Value;
    var query = source.SelectMany(r1 => table.Where(r2 => r2.Code == code && r2.ParentID == r1.ID), (r1, r2) => r2);
    if (parts.Count == 1)
    {
        return query;
    }
    parts.RemoveFirst();
    return query.Traverse(table, parts);
}

The root query is a special case; here's a working example of calling Traverse:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var parts = new LinkedList<string>(path.Split('/'));
    var table = context.TestTrees;

    var code = parts.First.Value;
    var root = table.Where(r1 => r1.Code == code && !r1.ParentID.HasValue);
    parts.RemoveFirst();

    foreach (var q in root.Traverse(table, parts))
        Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

The DB is queried only once with this generated code:

exec sp_executesql N'SELECT 
[Extent3].[ID] AS [ID], 
[Extent3].[ParentID] AS [ParentID], 
[Extent3].[Code] AS [Code]
FROM   [dbo].[TestTree] AS [Extent1]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[TestTree] AS [Extent2] ON ([Extent2].[Code] = @p__linq__1) AND ([Extent2].[ParentID] = [Extent1].[ID])
INNER JOIN [dbo].[TestTree] AS [Extent3] ON ([Extent3].[Code] = @p__linq__2) AND ([Extent3].[ParentID] = [Extent2].[ID])
WHERE ([Extent1].[Code] = @p__linq__0) AND ([Extent1].[ParentID] IS NULL)',N'@p__linq__1 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__2 nvarchar(4000),@p__linq__0 nvarchar(4000)',@p__linq__1=N'bar',@p__linq__2=N'baz',@p__linq__0=N'foo'

And while I like the execution plan of the raw query (see below) a bit better, the approach is valid and perhaps useful.

End of UPDATE

Using IEnumerable

The idea is to grab the relevant data from the table in one go and then do the traversing in the application using LINQ to Objects.

Here's a recursive function that will get a node from a sequence:

static TestTree GetNode(this IEnumerable<TestTree> table, string[] parts, int index, int? parentID)
{
    var q = table
        .Where(r => 
             r.Code == parts[index] && 
             (r.ParentID.HasValue ? r.ParentID == parentID : parentID == null))
        .Single();
    return index < parts.Length - 1 ? table.GetNode(parts, index + 1, q.ID) : q;
}

You can use like this:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var q = context.TestTrees.GetNode(path.Split('/'), 0, null);
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

This will execute one DB query for each path part, so if you want the DB to only be queried once, use this instead:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var q = context.TestTrees
        .ToList()
        .GetNode(path.Split('/'), 0, null);
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

An obvious optimization is to exclude the codes not present in our path before traversing:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var parts = path.Split('/');
    var q = context
        .TestTrees
        .Where(r => parts.Any(p => p == r.Code))
        .ToList()
        .GetNode(parts, 0, null);
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

This query should be fast enough unless most of your entities have similar codes. However, if you absolutely need top performance, you could use raw queries.

SQL Server Raw Query

For SQL Server a CTE-based query would probably be best:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var q = context.Database.SqlQuery<TestTree>(@"
        WITH Tree(ID, ParentID, Code, TreePath) AS
        (
            SELECT ID, ParentID, Code, CAST(Code AS nvarchar(512)) AS TreePath
            FROM dbo.TestTree
            WHERE ParentID IS NULL

            UNION ALL

            SELECT TestTree.ID, TestTree.ParentID, TestTree.Code, CAST(TreePath + '/' + TestTree.Code AS nvarchar(512))
            FROM dbo.TestTree
            INNER JOIN Tree ON Tree.ID = TestTree.ParentID
        )
        SELECT * FROM Tree WHERE TreePath = @path", new SqlParameter("path", path)).Single();
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

Limiting data by the root node is easy and might be quite useful performance-wise:

using (var context = new TestDBEntities())
{
    var path = "foo/bar/baz";
    var q = context.Database.SqlQuery<TestTree>(@"
        WITH Tree(ID, ParentID, Code, TreePath) AS
        (
            SELECT ID, ParentID, Code, CAST(Code AS nvarchar(512)) AS TreePath
            FROM dbo.TestTree
            WHERE ParentID IS NULL AND Code = @parentCode

            UNION ALL

            SELECT TestTree.ID, TestTree.ParentID, TestTree.Code, CAST(TreePath + '/' + TestTree.Code AS nvarchar(512))
            FROM dbo.TestTree
            INNER JOIN Tree ON Tree.ID = TestTree.ParentID
        )
        SELECT * FROM Tree WHERE TreePath = @path", 
            new SqlParameter("path", path),
            new SqlParameter("parentCode", path.Split('/')[0]))
            .Single();
    Console.WriteLine("{0} {1} {2}", q.ID, q.ParentID, q.Code);
}

Footnotes

All of this was tested with .NET 4.5, EF 5, SQL Server 2012. Data setup script:

CREATE TABLE dbo.TestTree
(
    ID int not null IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    ParentID int null REFERENCES dbo.TestTree (ID),
    Code nvarchar(100)
)
GO

INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (null, 'foo')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (1, 'bar')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (2, 'baz')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (null, 'bla')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (1, 'blu')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (2, 'blo')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (null, 'baz')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (1, 'foo')
INSERT dbo.TestTree (ParentID, Code) VALUES (2, 'bar')

All examples in my test returned the 'baz' entity with ID 3. It's assumed that the entity actually exists. Error handling is out of scope of this post.

UPDATE

To address @Bazzz's comment, the data with paths is shown below. Code is unique by level, not globally.

ID   ParentID    Code      TreePath
---- ----------- --------- -------------------
1    NULL        foo       foo
4    NULL        bla       bla
7    NULL        baz       baz
2    1           bar       foo/bar
5    1           blu       foo/blu
8    1           foo       foo/foo
3    2           baz       foo/bar/baz
6    2           blo       foo/bar/blo
9    2           bar       foo/bar/bar
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer as I think you spend a good while to get all these aspects tested. There is just one thing that perhaps I didn't explain well. The Code is not globally unique. It's unique at it's level in the Tree, but not globally. So the path foo/bar/baz results in 1 Entity, however querying the database for an Entity with Code baz might return more than one Entity. There might be another Entity at path bla/bar/baz and another at baz/foo/baz. So there is no translation from Code to ID. –  Bazzz Nov 27 '12 at 19:47
    
@Bazzz Thanks, I understand that aspect, without it there would probably be no question at all. Have a look at test data a put a couple of 'foo', 'bar', and 'baz' on each level and it works. –  Serge Belov Nov 27 '12 at 20:45
    
You say "you'll need to implement either a loop or recursion and to my best knowledge neither can be translated into an EF object store query." but to me it seems that Steven's answer does exactly that. I just didn't manage to get it to work but I think it should be possible. He does the recursion on the asp.net side and makes many sql where/and clauses. Is there a reason why you feel that it isn't possible to do this way? I consider your current answer a worthy alternative to his, but I'm more "charmed" by his approach (if it works) as it is closer to my initial attempt. –  Bazzz Nov 29 '12 at 8:52
    
@Bazzz It seems you're right, it's possible. Have a look at the updated answer. What I actually meant is it's not possible to do it in a single query with recursive lambdas or extension methods which I actually tried but I guess that's not that important. –  Serge Belov Nov 29 '12 at 11:49
    
It seems that the update is the implementation that I was looking for. It's the SelectMany that was the gap in my knowledge. Thank you for your answer and all the alternatives. :) –  Bazzz Nov 29 '12 at 17:39

The trick is to do it the other way around, and build up the following query:

from entity in dataContext.Entities
where entity.Code == "baz"
where entity.Parent.Code == "bar"
where entity.Parent.Parent.Code == "foo"
where entity.Parent.Parent.ParentID == 0
select entity;

A bit naive (hard coded) solution would be like this:

var pathParts = path.Split('/').ToList();

var entities = 
    from entity in dataContext.Entities 
    select entity;

pathParts.Reverse();

for (int index = 0; index < pathParts.Count+ index++)
{
    string pathPart = pathParts[index];

    switch (index)
    {
        case 0:
            entities = entities.Where(
                entity.Code == pathPart);
            break;
        case 1:
            entities = entities.Where(
                entity.Parent.Code == pathPart);
            break;
        case 2:
            entities = entities.Where(entity.Parent.Parent.Code == pathPart);
            break;
        case 3:
            entities = entities.Where(
                entity.Parent.Parent.Parent.Code == pathPart);
            break;
        default:
            throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
}

Doing this dynamically by building expression trees isn't trivial, but can be done by looking closely at what the C# compiler generates (using ILDasm or Reflector for instance). Here is an example:

private static Entity GetEntityByPath(DataContext dataContext, string path)
{
    List<string> pathParts = path.Split(new char[] { '/' }).ToList<string>();
    pathParts.Reverse();

    var entities =
        from entity in dataContext.Entities
        select entity;

    // Build up a template expression that will be used to create the real expressions with.
    Expression<Func<Entity, bool>> templateExpression = entity => entity.Code == "dummy";
    var equals = (BinaryExpression)templateExpression.Body;
    var property = (MemberExpression)equals.Left;

    ParameterExpression entityParameter = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Entity), "entity");

    for (int index = 0; index < pathParts.Count; index++)
    {
        string pathPart = pathParts[index];

        var entityFilterExpression =
            Expression.Lambda<Func<Entity, bool>>(
                Expression.Equal(
                    Expression.Property(
                        BuildParentPropertiesExpression(index, entityParameter),
                        (MethodInfo)property.Member),
                    Expression.Constant(pathPart),
                    equals.IsLiftedToNull,
                    equals.Method),
                templateExpression.Parameters);

        entities = entities.Where<Entity>(entityFilterExpression);

        // TODO: The entity.Parent.Parent.ParentID == 0 part is missing here.
    }

    return entities.Single<Entity>();
}

private static Expression BuildParentPropertiesExpression(int numberOfParents, ParameterExpression entityParameter)
{
    if (numberOfParents == 0)
    {
        return entityParameter;
    }

    var getParentMethod = typeof(Entity).GetProperty("Parent").GetGetMethod();

    var property = Expression.Property(entityParameter, getParentMethod);

    for (int count = 2; count <= numberOfParents; count++)
    {
        property = Expression.Property(property, getParentMethod);
    }

    return property;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this solution, it looks very interesting. However, during my studies of your code I noticed that you always use 0 as the numberOfParents parameter of the BuildParentPropertiesExpression. Perhaps you meant to provide index here? Also, why have you made your methods static? Could you elaborate on the advantage of that decision? –  Bazzz Nov 17 '12 at 18:00
    
I'm struggling a little with your solution: I changed 0 in index as mentioned above, then I changed (MethodInfo)property.Member) in (PropertyInfo)property.Member) because I was getting a cast error there, then I changed typeof(Entity).GetProperty("Parent") in typeof(Entity).GetProperty("Entity1") because I haven't got a property Parent, Linq2SQL called this Entity1. And now I get "The parameter 'entity' is not in scope." on the line return entities.Single<Entity>();. Any clue? –  Bazzz Nov 17 '12 at 18:17
    
I didn't run this code. Just compiled it. Just tried to show you the direction to go. It would be good (also as a learnin experience) to take the first (switch-case) solution and decompile it, using Reflector for instance. Use that info to create a dynamic solution. –  Steven Nov 18 '12 at 6:14
    
+1 for coming up with good suggestions, it's though that Serge Belov's answer is more complete. –  Bazzz Nov 29 '12 at 17:41

You need a recursive function instead of your loop. Something like this should do the job:

public EntityTable Single(string path)
{
    List<string> pathParts = path.Split('/').ToList();
    string code = pathParts.Last();

    var entities = dataContext.EntityTables.Where(e => e.Code == code);

    pathParts.RemoveAt(pathParts.Count - 1);
    return GetRecursively(entities, pathParts);
}

private EntityTable GetRecursively(IQueryable<EntityTable> entity, List<string> pathParts)
{
    if (!(entity == null || pathParts.Count == 0))
    {
        string code = pathParts.Last();

        if (pathParts.Count == 1)
        {
            return entity.Where(x => x.EntityTable1.Code == code && x.ParentId == x.Id).FirstOrDefault();
        }
        else
        {                    
            pathParts.RemoveAt(pathParts.Count - 1);

            return this.GetRecursively(entity.Where(x => x.EntityTable1.Code == code), pathParts);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return null;
    }
}

As you see, I am just returning the ultimate parent node. If you wanted to get a list of all EntityTable objects then I would make the recursive method to return a List of Ids of found nodes, and at the end - in the Single(...) method - run a simple LINQ query to get your IQueryable object using this list of IDs.

Edit: I tried to do your task but I think that there is a fundamental problem: there are cases when you are not able to identify a single path. For example, you have two pathes "foo/bar/baz" and "foo/bar/baz/bak" where "baz" entities are different. If you'll be seeking path "foo/bar/baz" then you'll always find two matching pathes (one would be partial of the four-entity path). Although you can get your "baz" entity correctly, but this is too confusing and I would just redesign this: either put a unique constraint so that each entity can only be used once, or store full path in the "Code" column.

share|improve this answer
    
Sounds interesting, but I do have few question though. 1) What is the object EntityTable that you introduced? My object is Entity and my datacontext has a property Entities. Entities represents one database table. 2) Does the return instruction not evaluate the function and send a call to the database (I don't know)? If so, you would have potentially created a whole lot of database calls now. 3) If the path were "foo/bar/baz", are you returning the Entity with Code == "foo" or with Code == "baz"? I'd like it to return the one with Code == "baz". I think this code returns "foo" –  Bazzz Nov 27 '12 at 8:21
    
1) EntityTable is same as Entities in your code - a table 2) It will make a separate call. I might be wrong, but same would happen in your original code with loop. 3) Yes, it returns the "foo". Sorry, I didn't understand the task. I'll update the code later during the day, but idea is to pass to the GetRecursive() a third argument, which would be list if Ids. On each iteration GetRecursive will then add Id of found record to the list and return the list. Method declaration would look like: private List<int> GetRecursively(IQueryable<EntityTable> entity, List<string> pathParts, List<int> Ids) –  lekso Nov 27 '12 at 9:37
    
then just run a query in your single() method to get an entities record by an Id –  lekso Nov 27 '12 at 9:39
    
1) understood. 2) unfortunately that's not what I'd like. My example makes only 1 call to the database as Where() uses Deferred Execution. I'd like to add the Where() calls recursively so just 1 IQueryable get executed at the database level. 3) I look forward to your updated answer, but please take point 2 into consideration. Thanks in advance. –  Bazzz Nov 27 '12 at 19:51
    
@Bazzz It looks like neither solution would work properly. I edited my answer to explain this. –  lekso Nov 28 '12 at 18:53

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