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I have a list;

list<Car*>* carList = new list<Car*>;

But when I try to reach element's property app stops running.

list<Car*>::iterator i = CarList->end();
while(i!=carList->begin())
{
   string plate = (*i)->Plate;//Here app stops
   i--;
}
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3  
I doubt you can even compile your code. –  billz Nov 17 '12 at 11:18
1  
What is AracList? –  juanchopanza Nov 17 '12 at 11:38
    
Sorry, I fixed aracList to carList. –  Baran Nov 17 '12 at 12:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That's not how iterators work. You iterate from begin to end or rbegin to rend. Your code will at best cause an infinite loop, and most likely cause a segfault. Also, do you need to be storing pointers? You could probably be storing copies.

std::list<Car> cars;
//insert a few cars

for (std::list<Car>::iterator it = cars.begin(), end = cars.end(); it != end; ++it) {
    std::cout << it->plate << std::endl;
}

The code is almost the exact same for reverse iteration:

for (std::list<Car>::reverse_iterator it = cars.rbegin(), end = cars.rend(); it != end; ++it) {
    std::cout << it->plate << std::endl;
}

Working with pointers instead complicates it a bit, but not too badly:

std::list<Car*>* cars = new std::list<Car*>;
//insert a few Car*

for (std::list<Car*>::iterator it = cars->begin(), end = cars->end(); it != end; ++it) {
    std::cout << (*it)->plate << std::endl;
}

Without seeing a broader context though, my guess is that you're unnecessarily using dynamic memory allocation.

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You should iterate from rbegin to rend.

If you still want to use begin and end, you can do the following:

list<Car*>::iterator i = CarList->end();
while(i!=AracList->begin())
{
   i--;
   string plate = (*i)->Plate;//Here app stops
}

Actually, end points to one position after the actual end of your list, this is why you can't deallocate end() directly.

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To iterate from end to begin use reversed iterators:

list<Car*>::reverse_iterator i = CarList->rbegin();
list<Car*>::reverse_iterator end = CarList->rend();
while(i!=end)
{
   string plate = (*i)->Plate;//Here app stops
   ++i;
}
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The problem is that the container end functions returns one beyond the actual end. That's why your program crashes. Either use the rbegin/rend functions as proposed by the other answers, or put i-- before accessing the iterator.

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Your code won't even compile at below line:

list<Car*> carList = new list<Car*>;
           ^^^ carList is not a pointer, you can't new it

Suggest you store Car objects in List

List<Car> cars;
Car car1;
cars.push_back(car1);
for (auto it = cars.begin(), end = cars.end(); it != end; ++it) {
    std::cout << it->plate << std::endl;
}

If you store Car pointer in List(You may need to store pointer for polymorphism reason, class derived from Car can also be stored in the list) but I suggest you store shared pointer in std::list.

C++11
std::list<std::shared_ptr<Car*>> Cars;

C++03:
std::list<std::shared_ptr<Car*> > Cars;
                               ^^ you need a space to differentiate from operator >>
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