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In paragraph "How should I design my exception classes?" in this "Error and Exception Handling" Boost web page, it reads:

[...] 3. Don't embed a std::string object or any other data member or base class whose copy constructor could throw an exception.

I have to define an exception class to represent some form of run-time error on file access, so I was thinking to derive it from std::runtime_error, and add a FileName() attribute to get access to the file name for which the error occurred.

For simplicity sake, my intention was to add a std::wstring data member to store the file name (in Unicode), but the aforementioned suggestion kind of stopped me. So, should I use a simple wchar_t buffer as a data member?

On modern desktop systems (which are my target platforms for this project), is it really important to pay attention to a dynamic string allocation for a file name? What is the likelihood of such allocation to fail? I can understand Boost's suggestion for limited-resource systems like embedded systems, but is it valid also for modern desktop PC's?

//
// Original design, using std::wstring.
//
class FileIOError : public std::runtime_error
{
public:
    FileIOError(HRESULT errorCode, const std::wstring& filename, const char* message)
        : std::runtime_error(message),
          m_errorCode(errorCode),
          m_filename(filename)
    {
    }

    HRESULT ErrorCode() const
    {
        return m_errorCode;
    } 

    const std::wstring& FileName() const
    {
        return m_filename;
    }

private:
    HRESULT m_errorCode; 
    std::wstring m_filename;
};



//
// Using raw wchar_t buffer, following Boost's guidelines.
//
class FileIOError : public std::runtime_error
{
public:
    FileIOError(HRESULT errorCode, const wchar_t* filename, const char* message)
        : std::runtime_error(message),
          m_errorCode(errorCode)
    {
        // Safe string copy
        // EDIT: use wcsncpy_s() with _TRUNCATE, as per Hans Passant's suggestion.
        wcsncpy_s(m_filename, filename, _TRUNCATE);
    }

    HRESULT ErrorCode() const
    {
        return m_errorCode;
    } 

    const wchar_t* FileName() const
    {
        return m_filename;
    }

private:
    HRESULT m_errorCode; 
    wchar_t m_filename[MAX_PATH]; // circa 260 wchar_t's
};
share|improve this question
    
wcscpy_s takes more arguments than that ;-) – Steve Jessop Nov 17 '12 at 12:45
    
To my knowledge the implementation of runtime_error on MSVC is not standard conforming: the copy constructor never fails, but if it cannot allocate memory it will zero initialize the copy. This means in turn that the post condition strcmp(e1.what(), e2.what()) == 0 is not satisfied. – ybungalobill Nov 17 '12 at 13:53
1  
You didn't exactly fix it. Keep in mind why the std::string copy constructor is troublesome, it easily blows when asked to deal with an unterminated char*. Which is in it self likely to cause an exception, particularly in your case since the file system won't be happy with it either, you don't want the exception handling to fail as well. So don't use strcpy_s(), that's a very nasty kaboom, favor strncpy_s() with the TRUNCATE option. – Hans Passant Nov 17 '12 at 14:11
    
@SteveJessop: nope, my call to wcscpy_s is correct. Note that in C++ thanks to template "magic", it's possible to omit the destination buffer size: see MSDN doc: template <size_t size> errno_t wcscpy_s( wchar_t (&strDestination)[size], const wchar_t *strSource ); // C++ only – Mr.C64 Nov 17 '12 at 15:43
    
@HansPassant: Thanks for the strncpy_s() with _TRUNCATE suggestion; I've fixed the code. – Mr.C64 Nov 17 '12 at 15:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted

What is the likelihood of such allocation to fail?

Pretty low.

Usually for the purpose of code correctness you only really care whether that likelihood is zero or non-zero. Even on a system where the built in ::operator new never fails due to rampant over-commit, consider the likelihood that your code will be used in a program that replaces ::operator new. Or maybe an OS will externally limit the amount of memory a process is permitted to allocate, by ulimit -v or otherwise.

Next consider the consequences of it failing. terminate() is called. Maybe you can live with that, especially since it's unlikely to actually happen.

Basically, do you want your program to even try to exit cleanly with a reasonable error message in the case where you can't allocate memory? If so, write the extra code and accept the limit on the length of the error message. Because Boost is general-purpose library code, it doesn't assume on behalf of its users that they don't want to try.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that in MSVC implementation (at least in VC10/VS2010 SP1) they dynamically allocate memory with malloc() for error messages in std::exception (unless a special constructor is called like this: std::exception("My error message", 1);: in this case std::exception::_Mydofree is set to false, and there is a pointer ownership; deep copies don't happen). So I'm assuming that MSVC implementation doesn't follow Boost's guideline. Am I missing something? Moreover, would a char m_errorMessage[1024]; // large enough data member be OK to store error messages, or is it too large? – Mr.C64 Nov 17 '12 at 16:05

If you are using C++11, you can use move semantics and move constructor of std::wstring, which is noexcept.

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