Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using a jQuery datagrid plugin to make an easy tool to edit my User's table in the admin area of a site. I store the passwords as md5() when the user registers. When ever I attempt to update the table, it is rehashing the password, thus making it unusable. I've tried several methods of verifying the password is the same as the one in the database, but none of them seem to be working.

Here is my update code:

PHP

<?php
require_once("../class/TimeClock.class.php");

$tc = new TimeClock();
$id = $_POST['id'];
$username = $_POST['username'];
$password = $_POST['password'];
$email = $_POST['email'];
$active = $_POST['active'];
$role = $_POST['role'];
$emp_id = $_POST['emp_id'];

if($tc->validatePass($id, $password)) {
try {
    $tc->connect();
    $query = $tc->dbh->prepare("UPDATE us_users SET username=:username,email=:email,active=:active,role=:role,emp_id=:emp_id WHERE id=:id");
    $query->execute(array(':username' => $username, ':email' => $email, ':active' => $active, ':role' => $role, ':emp_id' => $emp_id, ':id' => $id));
    $tc->close();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    throw new Exception('Something bad happened' . $e->getMessage());
}
} else {
try {
    $password = md5($password);
    $tc->connect();
    $query = $tc->dbh->prepare("UPDATE us_users SET username=:username,password=:password,email=:email,active=:active,role=:role,emp_id=:emp_id WHERE id=:id");
    $query->execute(array(':username' => $username, ':password' => $password, ':email' => $email, ':active' => $active, ':role' => $role, ':emp_id' => $emp_id, ':id' => $id));
    $tc->close();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
    throw new Exception('Something bad happened' . $e->getMessage());
}
}

echo json_encode(array(
'id' => $id,
'username' => $username,
'password' => $password,
'email' => $email,
'active' => $active,
'role' => $role,
'emp_id' => $emp_id
));
?> 

My validatePasss() function:

PHP

function validatePass($id, $pass) {
    try {
    $this->connect();
    $result = $this->dbh->prepare("SELECT username, password FROM us_users WHERE id=:id");
    $result->execute(array(':id' => $id));
    $userObj = $result->fetch(PDO::FETCH_ASSOC);
    } catch( PDOException $e) {
        throw new Exception('Something bad happened' . $e->getMessage());
        die();
    }
    if($pass == $userObj['password']) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
    $this->close();
}

I know that the mysql_ code is out dated, however, when I try to use PDO it throws errors, I think it is related to the component or something.

Thank you for any assistance you can provide.

EDIT: Changed the function to pure PDO, and here is an image of the datagrid so you see that the passwords are stored as a hash, and, unless changed, should be passed to the update script as a match to what is in the database.

share|improve this question
    
What errors? Can't provide much assistance if you can't give us a clue. –  Brad Nov 17 '12 at 15:10
    
Duh, sorry. The code is never showing that passwords match, and instead is always returning the md5() password instead, therefore making it impossible for a user to log in if I have edited any details. –  FireCrakcer37 Nov 17 '12 at 15:11
    
aren't you comparing plaintext password from form with md5 stored in db ? –  dev-null-dweller Nov 17 '12 at 15:18
    
the password that is getting passed from the form should either be the previous password stored as md5 hash (in which case it should return "match") or a new password that should then get hashed and stored in the db. –  FireCrakcer37 Nov 17 '12 at 15:20
1  
The two pieces of code seem to be have been written by two different people: the validatePass method properly uses PDO and prepared statements, while the code above it is terrible: not only does it use $_REQUEST (bad), it suppresses errors - that @ in front of the function call (worse) and is wide open to SQL injection (worst). –  NullUserException Nov 17 '12 at 15:44

2 Answers 2

In your validatePass() function, you must hash the password before comparing

if(md5($pass) == $userObj['password']) {
    return true;
} else {
    return false;
}

You could do the same in your query

select id
from from us_users
where username = :username and password = :password

and then

$result->execute(array(':username' => $username, ':password' => md5($password)));

and test for number of rows > 0.

share|improve this answer
    
The password is already a Hash, unless it has been changed in the form. Basically, unless I change the password field on the form, it is passing back the same value it pulled from the database in the first place. Using firbug, I have determined this to be true; however, it is still changing the password on every update. –  FireCrakcer37 Nov 17 '12 at 16:46
    
Trusting a md5 hash coming from the internet is the same as storing unhashed passwords in the database. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 17 '12 at 16:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The answer was actually simple after I thought it through. In the initial code, I was polling the database for the password of the username that was submitted with the form. If the username was changed, then of course the query would fail, and thus change the password. By setting it up to poll the database based on ID instead, the problem seems to have corrected itself. Thank you all for your help, I never would have figured this out without you guys.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.