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Here is my design of domain model and generic repository

public interface IEntity 
{
     long Id { get; }
}

public interface IRepository<T> where T : class, IEntity, new()
{
     void Save(T entity);
     void Delete(long id);
     T Get(long id);
     IEnumerable<T> GetAll();
}

public interface IUserRepository : IRepository<User> 
{
     User Login(string username, string password);
}

public class User : IEntity
{
     // Implementation of User
}

public abstract class BaseRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class, IEntity, new()
{
      // Implementation of IRepository
}

public class UserRepository : BaseRepository<User>, IUserRepository
{
      // Implementation of IUserRepository
      // Override BaseRepository if required
}

When I want to instantiate a repository instance I use a factory which implements following interface

public interface IRepositoryFactory
{
     R CreateRepository<R, T>()
          where R : IRepository<T>
          where T : class, IEntity, new();
}

And use the factory object as below

1. IRepositoryFactory factory = CreateFactory();
2. IUserRepository repository = factory.CreateRepository<IUserRepository, User>();
3. User user = repository.Login("user", "1234");

My problem is in the second line. I would like to use my factory like.

// Without specifying the User type parameter
factory.CreateRepository<IUserRepository>()

Since my IRepository interface has contstraint on type of entity my factory uses same constraint to satisfy IRepository requirement.

Is there any way to isolate this parameter from client?

share|improve this question
4  
you could add an IoC / Dependency Injection framework and use only Interfaces, the IOC container will fill substitute the interfaces with the correct implementation or else, do not use a generic base repository – Alex Peta Nov 17 '12 at 15:54
    
I use Ninject but rather injecting repository itself, I am trying to inject the factory which may be implemented something like EFRepositoryFactory, NHibernateRepositoryFactory etc. – Mehmet Ataş Dec 11 '12 at 10:25

I agree with the others that you would benefit from looking at a DI/IoC framework like Ninject.

So this answer is not a suggestion to not follow the other advices. But still, there are ways for you to solve your problem at a lower level. This code is not tested very well, but you could do something like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace TestConsole1
{
  public interface IEntity
  {
    long Id { get; }
  }

  public interface IRepository<T> where T : class, IEntity, new()
  {
    void Save(T entity);
    void Delete(long id);
    T Get(long id);
    IEnumerable<T> GetAll();
  }

  public interface IUserRepository : IRepository<User>
  {
    User Login(string username, string password);
  }

  public class User : IEntity
  {

    // Implementation of User
    public long Id
    {
      get { return 42; }
    }
  }

  public abstract class BaseRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class, IEntity, new()
  {
    // Implementation of IRepository
    public void Save(T entity)
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public void Delete(long id)
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public T Get(long id)
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> GetAll()
    {
      throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
  }

  public class UserRepository : BaseRepository<User>, IUserRepository
  {
    // Implementation of IUserRepository
    // Override BaseRepository if required
    public User Login(string username, string password)
    {
      return new User();
    }
  }

  class Factory 
  {
    public T CreateRepository<T>() where T : class 
    {
      //TODO: Implement some caching to avoid overhead of repeated reflection
      var abstractType = typeof(T);
      var types = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().ToList()
          .SelectMany(s => s.GetTypes())
          .Where(p => p.IsClass && 
                      !p.IsAbstract && 
                      abstractType.IsAssignableFrom(p));

      var concreteType = types.FirstOrDefault();
      if (concreteType == null)
        throw new InvalidOperationException(String.Format("No implementation of {0} was found", abstractType));

      return Activator.CreateInstance(concreteType) as T;
    }
  }

  class Program
  {
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
      var factory = new Factory();
      var userRepo = factory.CreateRepository<IUserRepository>();
      Console.WriteLine(userRepo.GetType());
      User user = userRepo.Login("name", "pwd");
      Console.WriteLine(user.Id);
      Console.ReadKey();
    }
  }
}

As this code reveals, a central point is that you will need to handle the coupling between your interface and the concrete class, for example between your IUserRepository and your UserRepository. If you do not handle this relation in a direct way via a mapper or similar you can implement a more automatic way like the one that is illustrated in the code.

However, if you use something like Ninject instead to handle this for you, it will be a better investment of your time as you will most likely find that the complexity of your factory class will grow significantly over time.

Br. Morten

share|improve this answer
    
I use Ninject but rather injecting repository itself, I am trying to inject the factory which may be implemented something like EFRepositoryFactory, NHibernateRepositoryFactory etc. – Mehmet Ataş Dec 11 '12 at 10:26

There are 3 problems with your code:

First is IEntity. Having single type of ID is against DDD, because in DDD, identity of object is given by domain and it can be anything from string, int, guid to complex type.

Second is generic repository with IRepository, which again, is highly useless, because you will rarely pass this interface and mostly will pass interface for repository for concrete entity.

Third thing is that in DDD repositories should exist only for aggregate roots, which is not reflected in your design.

If you fix this, you will find out, that implementation of interface of repository for specific entity can easily be suplied by DI framework.

share|improve this answer
1  
DDD is not a dogma, the repository pattern is very useful in any application, only that when dealing with the Domain, the repositories work with aggreagate roots. But in the same app, you can have other repositories which don't serve the domain so they aren't tied to the AR. About the single ID type being against DDD I don't know, it might be valid for the domain or it might not, it isn't a hard rule to obey. – MikeSW Nov 18 '12 at 8:02

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