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I'm using Python's logging mechanism to print output to the screen. I could do this with print statements, but I want to allow a finer-tuned granularity for the user to disable certain types of output. I like the format printed for errors, but would prefer a simpler format when the output level is "info."

For example:

  logger.error("Running cmd failed")
  logger.info("Running cmd passed")

In this example, I would like the format of the error to be printed differently:

# error
Aug 27, 2009 - ERROR: Running cmd failed
# info
Running cmd passed

Is it possible to have different formats for different log levels without having multiple logging objects? I'd prefer to do this without modifying the logger once it's created since there are a high number of if/else statements to determine how the output should be logged.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this by having a custom Formatter class:

class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    def format(self, record):
        #compute s according to record.levelno
        #for example, by setting self._fmt
        #according to the levelno, then calling
        #the superclass to do the actual formatting
        return s

Then attach a MyFormatter instance to your handlers.

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Outstanding - that worked perfectly. I modified the format() method to check levelno and change the message if need be. Otherwise it resets it back to the original string I passed in. Thanks! –  bedwyr Aug 27 '09 at 20:10
1  
Reference: docs.python.org/library/logging.html#formatter-objects –  S.Lott Aug 27 '09 at 21:25

I just ran into this issue and had trouble filling in the "holes" left in the above example. Here's a more complete, working version that I used. Hopefully this helps someone:

# Custom formatter
class MyFormatter(logging.Formatter):

    err_fmt  = "ERROR: %(msg)s"
    dbg_fmt  = "DBG: %(module)s: %(lineno)d: %(msg)s"
    info_fmt = "%(msg)s"


    def __init__(self, fmt="%(levelno)s: %(msg)s"):
        logging.Formatter.__init__(self, fmt)


    def format(self, record):

        # Save the original format configured by the user
        # when the logger formatter was instantiated
        format_orig = self._fmt

        # Replace the original format with one customized by logging level
        if record.levelno == logging.DEBUG:
            self._fmt = MyFormatter.dbg_fmt

        elif record.levelno == logging.INFO:
            self._fmt = MyFormatter.info_fmt

        elif record.levelno == logging.ERROR:
            self._fmt = MyFormatter.err_fmt

        # Call the original formatter class to do the grunt work
        result = logging.Formatter.format(self, record)

        # Restore the original format configured by the user
        self._fmt = format_orig

        return result

Edit:

Compliments of Halloleo, here's an example of how to use the above in your script:

fmt = MyFormatter()
hdlr = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)

hdlr.setFormatter(fmt)
logging.root.addHandler(hdlr)
logging.root.setLevel(DEBUG)
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This works great! I changed the references to MyFormatter by name to self for more consistency. –  halloleo Sep 6 '12 at 4:22
2  
And here I might add the way you can use the MyFormatter class in your program (replace each <CR> with a carriage return): fmt = MyFormatter()<CR> hdlr = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stdout)<CR> <CR> hdlr.setFormatter(fmt)<CR> logging.root.addHandler(hdlr)<CR> logging.root.setLevel(DEBUG)`<CR> –  halloleo Sep 6 '12 at 4:25
    
This answer won't work after 3.2, due to the changes in internal logging mechanism. logging.Formatter.format now depends of the style parameter of __init__. –  Evpok May 21 '13 at 0:32
    
Evpok is right. Add this after you assign self._fmt: self._style = logging.PercentStyle(self._fmt) –  Ross R Oct 11 at 12:55

And again like JS answer but more compact.

class SpecialFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    FORMATS = {logging.DEBUG :"DBG: %(module)s: %(lineno)d: %(message)s",
               logging.ERROR : "ERROR: %(message)s",
               logging.INFO : "%(message)s",
               'DEFAULT' : "%(levelname)s: %(message)s"}

    def format(self, record):
        self._fmt = self.FORMATS.get(record.levelno, self.FORMATS['DEFAULT'])
        return logging.Formatter.format(self, record)

hdlr = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stderr)
hdlr.setFormatter(SpecialFormatter())
logging.root.addHandler(hdlr)
logging.root.setLevel(logging.INFO)
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This answer won't work after 3.2, due to the changes in internal logging mechanism. logging.Formatter.format now depends of the style parameter of __init__. –  Evpok May 21 '13 at 0:33

This is an adaptation of estani's answer to the new implementation of logging.Formatter which now relies on formatting styles. Mine relies on '{' style format, but it can be adapted. Could be refined to be more general and allow selection of formatting style and custom messages as arguments to __init__, too.

class SpecialFormatter(logging.Formatter):
    FORMATS = {logging.DEBUG : logging._STYLES['{']("{module} DEBUG: {lineno}: {message}"),
           logging.ERROR : logging._STYLES['{']("{module} ERROR: {message}"),
           logging.INFO : logging._STYLES['{']("{module}: {message}"),
           'DEFAULT' : logging._STYLES['{']("{module}: {message}")}

    def format(self, record):
        # Ugly. Should be better
        self._style = self.FORMATS.get(record.levelno, self.FORMATS['DEFAULT'])
        return logging.Formatter.format(self, record)

hdlr = logging.StreamHandler(sys.stderr)
hdlr.setFormatter(SpecialFormatter())
logging.root.addHandler(hdlr)
logging.root.setLevel(logging.INFO)
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1  
Thanks for updating this to work with Python3. I ran into the same problem in Python3 and came up with a similar solution. Would you please be so kind as to post this answer there as well? stackoverflow.com/questions/14844970/… –  JS. May 21 '13 at 19:20
    
{{done}}​​​​​​​ –  Evpok May 21 '13 at 20:20
2  
Using the new '{' style in your comments? :-) –  JS. May 21 '13 at 20:34
    
@JS. Just Wikipedia :p –  Evpok May 21 '13 at 20:36

The above solution works with 3.3.3 release. However with 3.3.4 you get the following error.

FORMATS = { logging.DEBUG : logging._STYLES['{']("{module} DEBUG: {lineno}: {message}"),

TypeError: 'tuple' object is not callable

After some searching around in the logging class Lib\logging__init__.py I found that a data structure has changed from 3.3.3 to 3.3.4 that causes the issue

3.3.3

_STYLES = {
    '%': PercentStyle,
    '{': StrFormatStyle,
    '$': StringTemplateStyle
}

3.3.4

_STYLES = {
   '%': (PercentStyle, BASIC_FORMAT),
   '{': (StrFormatStyle, '{levelname}:{name}:{message} AA'),
    '$': (StringTemplateStyle, '${levelname}:${name}:${message} BB'),
}

The updated solution is therefore

class SpecialFormatter(logging.Formatter):
     FORMATS = {logging.DEBUG : logging._STYLES['{'][0]("{module} DEBUG: {lineno}: {message}"),
       logging.ERROR : logging._STYLES['{'][0]("{module} ERROR: {message}"),
       logging.INFO : logging._STYLES['{'][0]("{module}: {message}"),
       'DEFAULT' : logging._STYLES['{'][0]("{module}: {message}")}

 def format(self, record):
    # Ugly. Should be better
    self._style = self.FORMATS.get(record.levelno, self.FORMATS['DEFAULT'])
    return logging.Formatter.format(self, record)
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If you are just looking to skip formatting certain levels, you can do something simpler than the other answers like the following:

class FormatterNotFormattingInfo(logging.Formatter):
    def __init__(self, fmt = '%(levelname)s:%(message)s'):
        logging.Formatter.__init__(self, fmt)

    def format(self, record):
        if record.levelno == logging.INFO:
            return record.getMessage()
        return logging.Formatter.format(self, record)

This also has the advantage of working before and after the 3.2 release by not using internal variables like self._fmt nor self._style.

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