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In my code I use a lot of (named) callback functions, just to give a quick example:

function showThis(callback) {

  // Do something

  if (callback && typeof(callback) === 'function') {
    callback();
  }

}

Now I have this pattern repeat throughout different functions (I'm talking about the callback part), so is it considered to be better if I make one generic callback handler function and include that?

Something like:

function doCallback(callback) {

  if (callback && typeof(callback) === 'function') {
    callback();
  }

}

function showThis(callback) {

  // Do something

  doCallback(callback);
}

I would think that's better to keep code DRY, but I'm unsure. Any help is greatly appreciated!

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2  
No need for checking truthiness of callback, also typeof is no function but an operator. This should be enough: if (typeof callback === 'function') –  Bergi Nov 17 '12 at 16:47
    
You're right about the operator, don't know how I missed that ;-) –  Reinier Kaper Nov 17 '12 at 17:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In my opinion it's not necessary to have a callback handler. In different situations you may need to call the callback with different context (for example callback.call(ob... or callback.apply(obj...). So you will need an extra parameter of the callback handler (the context). Another thing that isn't very pleasantly is that you may need to pass custom arguments to the callback. With the callback handler you can make the pain smaller by passing all the parameters into an array and applying the function on them. Something like...:

function callbackHandler(callback, arguments, context) {
    if (typeof callback === 'function') {
        return callback.apply(context, arguments);
    }
    return null;
}

But there're so many optional parameters... Another thing is the check which you are doing:

if (callback && typeof callback === 'function') //notice that typeof is an operator not a function, so you don't need parentless

is not actually necessary, this is enough: typeof callback === 'function'

The first condition will return false only if callback is evaluated to false but if it's evaluated to false typeof callback wont return function. So the condition is short enough.

That's why I think that you don't need a callback handler. And by the way nice question I love such topics! :-)

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I would argue that inside your own code, if you know that callback is always a function, there's no need to do that check at all. –  adeneo Nov 17 '12 at 16:31
2  
But you're not sure that the person who is using your API will pass a function. That's why you need to check the typeof the argument. –  Minko Gechev Nov 17 '12 at 16:32
    
Yes exactly, I try not to assume things usually. Thanks for the feedback, in this case I'll probably still go with the generic handler, as I already have 7 functions using it, so just to keep it DRY it might be worth it. –  Reinier Kaper Nov 17 '12 at 17:13
1  
I'm glad that my feedback was useful. I love to take a part into such discussions about writing cleaner code. –  Minko Gechev Nov 17 '12 at 17:16
    
Yes I always try to improve on my code and although I'm no JavaScript guru, I do think my patterns are usually decent. But, as you can see, I still have enough to learn ;-) –  Reinier Kaper Nov 17 '12 at 17:19

Yes, that might well be a good idea. Like you said, it avoids repeating yourself, and it's perfectly clear as to its intent. While you do lose access to the variables that were in the showThis scope, you were losing that anyway because callback wasn't defined there, so there's nothing to worry about.

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Okay thanks, I think I could always supply variables as arguments to the generic callback function anyway, if that's what I need. –  Reinier Kaper Nov 17 '12 at 16:22

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