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I am trying tokenize strings into ngrams. Strangely in the documentation for the NGramTokenizer I do not see a method that will return the individual ngrams that were tokenized. In fact I only see two methods in the NGramTokenizer class that return String Objects.

Here is the code that I have:

Reader reader = new StringReader("This is a test string");
NGramTokenizer gramTokenizer = new NGramTokenizer(reader, 1, 3);
  1. Where are the ngrams that were tokenized?
  2. How can I get the output in Strings/Words?

I want my output to be like: This, is, a, test, string, This is, is a, a test, test string, This is a, is a test, a test string.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+50

I don't think you'll find what you're looking for trying to find methods returning String. You'll need to deal with Attributes.

Should work something like:

Reader reader = new StringReader("This is a test string");
NGramTokenizer gramTokenizer = new NGramTokenizer(reader, 1, 3);
CharTermAttribute charTermAttribute = tokenStream.addAttribute(CharTermAttribute.class);

while (gramTokenizer.incrementToken()) {
    String token = charTermAttribute.toString();
    //Do something
}

Be sure to reset() the Tokenizer it if it needs to be reused after that, though.


Tokenizing grouping of words, rather than chars, per comments:

Reader reader = new StringReader("This is a test string");
TokenStream tokenizer = new StandardTokenizer(Version.LUCENE_36, reader);
tokenizer = new ShingleFilter(tokenizer, 1, 3);
CharTermAttribute charTermAttribute = tokenStream.addAttribute(CharTermAttribute.class);

while (tokenizer.incrementToken()) {
    String token = charTermAttribute.toString();
    //Do something
}
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What can I do with Strings instead of chars in terms of Attributes? So then my output would be something like: This, is, a, test, string, This is, is a, a test, ... a test string. –  CodeKingPlusPlus Nov 20 '12 at 23:59
    
Okay, that's not what Lucene's NGramTokenizer is designed to handle. What you'll want to use, I think, is a ShingleFilter combined with StandardTokenizer. I'll update my answer, easier to express there... –  femtoRgon Nov 21 '12 at 0:13
    
Do you know of any stop word filters I can use in the tokenization process? –  CodeKingPlusPlus Nov 21 '12 at 0:34
    
I think the standard would be StopFilter. Another very typical filter to apply would be StandardFilter, by the way. I would think StandardFilter, then StopFilter, then ShingleFilter would probably get good results. –  femtoRgon Nov 21 '12 at 16:12
    
Took a look at my latest post involving the StopFilter : stackoverflow.com/questions/13501421/… –  CodeKingPlusPlus Nov 21 '12 at 20:21
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Without creating a test program, I would guess that incrementToken() returns the next token which will be one of the ngrams.

For example, using ngram lengths of 1-3 with the string 'a b c d', NGramTokenizer could return:

a
a b
a b c
b
b c
b c d
c
c d
d

where 'a', 'a b', etc. are the resulting ngrams.

[Edit]

You might also want to look at Querying lucene tokens without indexing, as it talks about peeking into the token stream.

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The problem is incrementToken() returns a boolean... –  CodeKingPlusPlus Nov 20 '12 at 23:04
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For recent version of Lucene (4.2.1) , this is a clean code wich works.Before execution this code, you have to import 2 following jar files: lucene-core-4.2.1.jar and lucene-analuzers-common-4.2.1.jar Find these files at http://www.apache.org/dyn/closer.cgi/lucene/java/4.2.1

//LUCENE 4.2.1
Reader reader = new StringReader("This is a test string");      
NGramTokenizer gramTokenizer = new NGramTokenizer(reader, 1, 3);

CharTermAttribute charTermAttribute = gramTokenizer.addAttribute(CharTermAttribute.class);

while (gramTokenizer.incrementToken()) {
String token = charTermAttribute.toString();
System.out.println(token);}
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