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I'm in the process of trying to write a program that takes in two words or phrases, and tests them to see if they are an anagram or not by seeing if their unicode values match. The method 'search' only runs if they are the same length.. I had an issue with it, but now it's resolved.

Here is the revised version:

I was wondering what you think about the style of how the code is laid out. Is it clear? Should I do it differently? Or do you feel it is easy to read? Do you have any advice on how I can make it clearer to others?

If I add comments, should they be short or should I explain in a multiline comment how that portion works?

I want to try to make it look as straight forward as possible and I've gotten very little real advice about that., so if anyone has any ideas..

import java.util.Scanner;

public class AnagramCount {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
   System.out.println("Please enter two words, one per line, to test if it is an anagram");
   Scanner userInput = new Scanner(System.in);
   String word1 = userInput.nextLine();
   String word2 = userInput.nextLine();
   int count = 0;
   int[] char_code = new int[word1.length()];
   int[] char_code2 = new int[word2.length()];
   char[] temp = word2.toCharArray();
   boolean match = true;

   if (word1.length() == word2.length()){
      search(word1, word2, count, char_code, char_code2, match, temp);
      if (match == true){
         if (char_code[word1.length()-1] == 0){
            match = false;
         }
      else {
      // if match remains true after this final check, information about it will print
         System.out.print("word1 unicode values: ");
         for(int i = 0; i < word1.length(); i++){
            System.out.print(char_code[i] + " ");
         }
         System.out.println();
         System.out.print("word2 unicode values: ");
         for(int i = 0; i < word1.length(); i++){
            System.out.print(char_code2[i] + " ");
         }
      }
   }
}
   else {
      match = false;
   }
   System.out.println("\n" + "Anagram? t/f?: " + match);
}

public static void search(String word1, String word2, int count, int[] char_code, int[]   char_code2, boolean match, char[] temp)
{
   StringBuilder word1check = new StringBuilder(word1);
   StringBuilder word2check = new StringBuilder(word2);
   int word1_unicode = 0;
   int word2_unicode = 0;

   if(count >= word1.length()) 
      return;

   else
   {      
      for(int i = 0; i < word2.length(); i++){         
         if (word1.charAt(count) == word2.charAt(i)){

         word1_unicode = word1check.codePointAt(count);
         char_code[count] = word1_unicode;  

         temp[i] = 0;
         String str = new String(temp);
         word2 = str;

         word2_unicode = word2check.codePointAt(i);
         char_code2[count] = word2_unicode; 

   if(count==word1.length()-1)
     break;

  search(word1, word2, ++count, char_code, char_code2, match, temp);

     }
  }   

}
  return;
}
}
share|improve this question
9  
The first thing to change is the indentation: indent your code so it's easy to see the execution flow. –  Jon Skeet Nov 17 '12 at 19:15
    
thanks, i just did that. –  Brittany Arthur Nov 17 '12 at 19:45
    
Why are you using recursion for a non-recursive task? The linear approach (count instances of each character for words of equal length) would be much simpler to code, and much faster. –  Jim Garrison Nov 17 '12 at 23:19
    
you're right, with this project I'm more interested in seeing how these different components fit together than maximizing efficiency. I think ill give up the idea of using recursion since I can't get the program to do what I need it to. –  Brittany Arthur Nov 18 '12 at 0:11

1 Answer 1

Your problem occurs right in the recursion you are using not where you think. Before calling the method 'search' you increment the count variable.

search(word1, word2, ++count, char_code, char_code2, match);

The easiest way to fix this is to add a check right before calling the method within itself

if(count==word1.length()-1)
    break;
search(word1, word2, ++count, char_code, char_code2, match);

This way you won't call the search method if count has reached the end of a word and it will never manage to break it by going out of bounds.

Another problem which I've spotted during my test is here

for(int i = 0; i < word1.length()-1; i++)

This way you will never reach the end of the second word as you are searching and it will never go in here if your second word end on a character which is used only once in the word

if (word1.charAt(count) == word2.charAt(i)){
// I think the problem is right around here, but I don't know what to change 

    word1_unicode = word1check.codePointAt(count);
    char_code[count] = word1_unicode; 

    if(char_code2[count] == 0) { //prevents double counting of letters
        word2_unicode = word2check.codePointAt(i);
        char_code2[count] = word2_unicode;
        search(word1, word2, ++count, char_code, char_code2, match);
    } 

    if((count==0)&&(i == word1.length()-1)){
        match = false;
    }
}

To fix this I simply removed the '-1' in the 'for' loop.

The last strange problem in this method is that it actually returns a boolean type which you have predefined at the start of the program and it never actually reaches the point to get false. At this point I found out that your double counting prevention doesn't work too. And basically about half of the lines weren't really doing something.

Hope I helped you by fixing the problems I found in the program. At this point it will say 2 words are anagrams if all the letters in the first word can be found in the second. The easiest way I can think of for preventing double counting of words is to simply overwrite the letter at this position.

Here is the code which actually was working fine with my idea for preventing double counting of letters :

import java.util.Scanner;

public class test {

public static void main(String[] args) {

System.out.println("Please enter two words, one per line, to test if it is an anagram");
Scanner userInput = new Scanner(System.in);
String word1 = userInput.nextLine();
String word2 = userInput.nextLine();
int count = 0;
boolean match = true;

    if (word1.length() == word2.length()){
        match = search(word1, word2, count,match);
    }
    else {
        match = false;
    }

    if(match)
        System.out.println("The words are anagrams");
    else
        System.out.println("The words are not anagrams");
}

    public static boolean search(String word1, String word2, int count,boolean match)
    {

        if(count >= word1.length()-1) 
            return match;

        else
        {
            for(int i = 0; i < word1.length(); i++)
            { 

                if (word1.charAt(count) == word2.charAt(i)){
                    char[] temp = word2.toCharArray();
                    temp[i] = 0;
                    word2 = temp.toString();
                    search(word1, word2, ++count, match);
                } 
                else
                    match = false;
            }
        }
        return match;

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, your use of .toCharArray was very clever. i had some trouble with converting it into a string, not sure what was going on with the .toString() or whatever issue it was, but no worries - i used a different solution for that part. and my program works very well now, it can compare the unicode values and use that to determine if it is an anagram or not. Thank-you so much for your input! I've been working days on writing anagram programs, and this one has been especially challenging. I appreciate your help. I'm so glad it works!! –  Brittany Arthur Nov 18 '12 at 9:19
    
Glad I could help sorry for giving you different solution to the double crossing letters but found yours more complicated than it needed and though the other idea would do fine. –  Wald Nov 18 '12 at 14:16

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