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I'm using .NET 4.5 and C#. My code below works fine if the spelling is case sensitive. In other words if the file is spelled exactly like "SetupV8.exe". But I really need it to be case insensitive. I've played with it but cant find a way.

foreach (string file in directory.EnumerateFiles((AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory),  
         "*.exe", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
   if (!file.Contains("SetupV8.exe")
   {    
      // Do something
   }
}

Thanks

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file.ToLower().Contains("setupv8.exe") usually works fine. (though you might want to consider EndsWith instead) –  Chris Sinclair Nov 17 '12 at 19:48
    
Oh for petes sake. Of course that works. Thanks! –  JimDel Nov 17 '12 at 19:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

file.ToLower().Contains("setupv8.exe") usually works fine. (though you might want to consider EndsWith instead)

Also, since EnumerateFiles returns FileInfo, you might as well check its Name property instead:

foreach (FileInfo file in directory.EnumerateFiles((AppDomain.CurrentDomain.BaseDirectory),  
         "*.exe", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
   if (!file.Name.ToLower().Contains("setupv8.exe")
   {    
      // Do something with file
   }
}

Also, if the name is "SetupV8.exe" and you don't expect it to be prefixed/suffixed with anything, perhaps just straight up check for equality at this point.

EDIT: Perhaps more importantly, you probably want to use just the file name. Unless you want to check if any part of the directory path matches. That is, you might not want c:\temp\setupv8.exe_directory\subdirectory\setupv8.exe to match as a false positive.

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Very good info Chris. Ill use .EndsWith Thank you. –  JimDel Nov 17 '12 at 19:58

string.Contains is just a wrapper around string.IndexOf as you can see from the NET sources

public bool Contains(string value)
{
    return (this.IndexOf(value, StringComparison.Ordinal) >= 0);
}

and string.IndexOf has a proper parameter to ignore the case of the string to search

 if (file.IndexOf("SetupV8.exe", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase) >= 0)
     // File found

StringComparison enum

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Just force your string to all lower case for the comparison..

file.ToLower().Contains("setupv8.exe")
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Thanks. I think i need some sleep. –  JimDel Nov 17 '12 at 19:50

If you want to compare the whole file name including the extension but without the directory:

file.Name.Equals(fileNameAndExt, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

file.FullName also includes the directory name. StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase is the fastest comparison method as it does not apply culture specific treatments. This is the correct way to do it, since the file system doesn’t do it either.

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As per the MSDN article you can pass in StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase to compare regardless of case.

file.name.Contains("SetupV8.exe", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)

This will be more efficient as you don't create two mutalatable strings in the process and in my opinion looks cleaner than using .toLower()

However you should consider what you are checking here, would a file hash be better? You might be introducing a security problem if you are assuming the contents of the file is know.

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1  
Does String.Contains have an overload accepting a StringComparison? –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Nov 17 '12 at 20:10

just make an extension method

public bool Contains(this string my,string his)
 {
      return my.ToLower().Contains(his.ToLower());
 }

usage

....
if(file.Contains("SetupV8")) // the case is ignored !
....
....
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