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I am trying to setup a directory as a hotfolder in Go. As soon as a file is finished written to that directory, a function should get called.

Now I came across https://github.com/howeyc/fsnotify that seems to be a good building block for such a hotfolder.

My problem is that fsnotify emits lots of "file changed" events during the write but none when finished, so I assume its not possible that way to see if a process has finished writing files.

So I would think of "wait one second after the last 'file changed' event and then run my function. But I am unsure if this is the best way to deal with the problem and I am not really sure how to integrate this cleanly in the main event loop (from the given github page):

for {
    select {
    case ev := <-watcher.Event:
        log.Println("event:", ev)
    case err := <-watcher.Error:
        log.Println("error:", err)
    }
}

Any idea / advise?

share|improve this question
    
Does your application need to be cross-platform? For instance, on a Linux-based system it's possible to spawn inotifywatch telling it to only monitor for the events of type CLOSE_WRITE and parse its output thus getting notified only of files that have been created/opened then written to then closed. –  kostix Nov 22 '12 at 22:05
    
Well, I do need it cross plattform, but if my solution is not good enough, I'll come back to your suggestion, thanks! –  topskip Nov 23 '12 at 6:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The following code will wait until no event has been received for at least one second and then call f().

for {
    timer := time.NewTimer(1*time.Second)

    select {
    case ev := <-watcher.Event:
        log.Println("event:", ev)
    case err := <-watcher.Error:
        log.Println("error:", err)
    case <-timer.C:
        f()
    }

    timer.Stop()
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. I have now taken a two step approach: first I look for a "CREATE" event, then I jump to a loop like the one you gave to "wait" until written. –  topskip Nov 18 '12 at 14:42
    
Very nice execution of this concept. :thumbs-up: –  Daniel Nov 26 '12 at 19:05

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