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I was coding some homework (101 level). When I tried to compile the code, I got some virus alert from bit defender:

#include <stdio.h>

int main ( void ) {
int numbers [10];
int i, temp;

for (i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
    numbers[i] = 0;

printf("Enter up to 10 integers. input '-1' to finish \n");

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
    scanf("%d", &temp);
    if (temp == -1) {
        break;
    } else {
        numbers [i] = temp - 1;
    }
}

for (i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
    printf("the numbers are: %d\n", numbers[i]);

return 0;
}

virus alert print screen

I believe the problem is with this piece of code:

    for (i = 1; i <= 10; ++i)
        numbers[i] = 0;

Why the trojan virus alert? what did I do?

share|improve this question
2  
don't think that has anything to do with your homework, it seems like you have some viruses running around. –  mux Nov 17 '12 at 21:33
2  
wow, if this is really because of your code, this is an extremely paranoid virus scanner.. You're accessing memory which doesn't belong to your application. Array indices start at 0. –  stefan Nov 17 '12 at 21:34
2  
You are overrunning the array bounds, but I would be very surprised if your virus scanner could pick that up. –  Kerrek SB Nov 17 '12 at 21:34
    
@KerrekSB I'm still interested why the scanner picks that up. More specifically, why does it think buffer overflow = Meur.GZ –  Jan Dvorak Nov 17 '12 at 21:38
1  
@JanDvorak: note it's Heur (for heuristic), not Meur. So, it detects a generic trojan via heuristic analysis. –  ninjalj Nov 18 '12 at 23:32
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Don't pay attention some antivirus programs recognize the compiled items as virus, it does the same avast with visual studio, just add exception to your antivirus list. But your code has some problems indeed.

  • for (i = 1; i <= 10; ++i) is incorrect, because the arrays in C start on 0, and second to initialize variables you don't need to do for loops you can assign them values like any other variable.
  • numbers [i] = temp - 1 The way you store the values in the array is not so good, because you are altering the inputed values when you do -1.

a

/*For the array initialization.*/
int numbers[10] = { 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 };

/*For inputing the values.*/

for ( i = 0; i < 10; i++ ){
    scanf( "%d", &temp );
    if( temp == -1 ){
        numbers[ i ] = -1;
        break;
    else{
        numbers[ i ] = temp;
    }
}

/*For the printing. */

for( i = 0; i < 10 ; i++ ){
    if( numbers[ i ] == -1 ){
        break;
    }
    printf( "numbers[%d] is %d", i, numbers[ i ] );
}
share|improve this answer
    
so, if i enter 10 valid numbers i will face an array with 10 valid numbers. how often will the != -1 check in the printing part actually catch the end of the array? –  akira Nov 17 '12 at 21:54
2  
if( numbers[ i ] = -1 ) will always evaluate as true. Use == instead. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 17 '12 at 22:15
    
Thanks for the tips! –  Nomics Nov 18 '12 at 19:03
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you trigger a buffer-overflow. your array 'numbers' is 10 items big, you access the 11th item.

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Use i=0 instead of i =1 because in C array indexes start at 0

size of array is 10 so the last index is 9 So you are accessing the array index which is out of bound in numbers[10], so it's undefined behaviour

Array would be like this :

numbers[0] ,numbers[1], . . . numbers[9]

modify code to this :

for(i=0;i<10;i++)
  printf("%d\t",numbers[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
as long as he stays within the boundaries of the array: no problem where he starts or ends. –  akira Nov 17 '12 at 21:35
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