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This question has come up several times and I've read all the answers, but I haven't seen a truly robust way to handle this. In my solution, I am using listeners from the calling Activity to the AlertDialog like so:

public class MyDialogFragment extends DialogFragment {

    public interface MyDialogFragmentListener {
        public void onReturnValue(String foo);
    }

    public void init(boolean someValue)
    {
        sSomeValue = someValue;
        listeners = new ArrayList<MyDialogFragmentListener>();
    }
    static boolean sSomeValue;
    private static ArrayList<MyDialogFragmentListener> listeners;

    public void addMyDialogFragmentListener(MyDialogFragmentListener l)
    {
        listeners.add(l);
    }

    public void removeMyDialogFragmentListener(MyDialogFragmentListener l)
    {
        listeners.remove(l);
    }

    @Override
    public Dialog onCreateDialog(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        AlertDialog.Builder builder = new AlertDialog.Builder(getActivity());
        builder.setTitle(R.string.title)
           .setPositiveButton(R.string.ok, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
               @Override
               public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                   for (MyDialogFragmentListener listener : listeners) {
                       listener.onReturnValue("some value");
                   }
               }
           })
           .setNegativeButton(R.string.cancel, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
               public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
                   // User cancelled the dialog
                   // Nothing to do but exit
               }
           });
        if (sSomeValue) {
            builder.setMessage(R.string.some_value_message);
        } else {
            builder.setMessage(R.string.not_some_value_message);
        }
        // Create the AlertDialog object and return it
        return builder.create();
    }
}

Then in the calling Activity, I instantiate the object normally, pass in any arguments through init and set my listener.

Here's the problem: when you rotate the device and change orientation while the dialog is open, both the Activity and MyDialogFragment objects get re-created. To ensure that the input values don't get screwed up, I am setting my initialized values as static. This feels hacky to me, but since there will only be one such dialog at a time, I am ok with it. Where the problem comes in is with the return value. The original listener will get called. That's fine because the object still exists, but if there is a requirement to update the UI on the Activity (which there is), it won't get updated because the new Activity instance is now controlling the UI.

One solution I am considering is casting getActivity() in the dialog class to my Activity and forcing the dialog itself to add a listener, rather than having the calling Activity do it. But this just feels like a snowballing of hacks.

What is the best practice for handling this gracefully?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are on the right track, I follow the method recommended by the Android Developers - Using DialogFragments article.

You create your DialogFragment and define an interface that the Activity will implement, like you have done above with this:

public interface MyDialogFragmentListener {
    public void onReturnValue(String foo);
}

Then in the DialogFragment when you want to return the result to the Activity you cast the activity to the interface:

@Override
public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int id) {
    MyDialogFragmentListener activity = (MyDialogFragmentListener) getActivity();
    activity.onReturnValue("some value");
}

Then in the Activity you implement that interface and grab the value:

public class MyActivity implements MyDialogFragmentListener {
    ...
    @Override
    public void onReturnValue(String foo) {
        Log.i("onReturnValue", "Got value " + foo + " back from Dialog!");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ok, that seems like the easiest way to go from where I am, but let me complicate it just a bit. I also have a situation where I launch a dialog from within another dialog (as opposed to an Activity). In this case, the first dialog is listening on the second one. How would this solution work in that case? –  Eric Lange Nov 17 '12 at 22:17
2  
I would probably use the interface to let the flow of control return to the Activity and let it launch the second DialogFragment. Sounds like an interesting problem, what is the use case? –  antew Nov 17 '12 at 22:30
    
I have an Activity with a list of devices. When the user selects a device, it pops up a dialog showing information (status, connectivity, etc.) for that device. The user can then choose to delete or rename the device. In the delete case, I pop up a confirmation. In the rename case, I pop up a dialog asking for the new name. –  Eric Lange Nov 18 '12 at 4:20
    
All right. I am doing as you suggested and triaging all callbacks through the Activity. Each Dialog calls back to the Activity during onCreate and sets a static reference to itself so that the Activity always has the latest object. This seems to work. Thanks! –  Eric Lange Nov 18 '12 at 17:01
    
Awesome, glad you got it working :) There might be another way to handle it neatly through the existing dialog, I'll have to try it out one day. –  antew Nov 18 '12 at 18:57

You can fire off an Intent from your Dialog's onClickListner which the Activity will be listening for.

Take a look at this tutorial on Broadcasting and Receiving Intents

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This seems like the way to go. I will try this out. Thanks! –  Eric Lange Nov 17 '12 at 22:19
1  
On a deeper read, this seems like the wrong use case for broadcasting. Broadcasting is intended for inter-app communication and requires registering with the manifest to create objects that don't yet exist. Antew's solution is probably the right choice for this. –  Eric Lange Nov 18 '12 at 17:04

Very old post but...

I had appropriate variables in the dialog class:

int selectedFooStatus = 0; 

Manipulated them when the dialog was interacted with:

.setSingleChoiceItems(FOO_CHOICES, -1, new DialogInterface.OnClickListener() {
                   @Override
                   public void onClick(DialogInterface dialog, int which) {

                       selectedFooStatus = which; 

                   }})

In the onclick call back method I cast the returning fragment appropriately and used a getter to return the value.

    public void onDialogPositiveClick(DialogFragment dialog) {

                ChangeFooStatusDialog returnedDialog = (ChangeFooStatusDialog) dialog;

                this.fooStatus = returnedDialog.getSelectedFooStatus();

}
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