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I've been trying to solve this problem on ACM Timus

http://acm.timus.ru/problem.aspx?space=1&num=1932

My first approach is O(n^2) which surely isn't fast enough to pass all tests. The below O(n^2) code gives TL on test 10.

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class testtest
{
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
    {
        BufferedReader rr = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        int n = Integer.parseInt(rr.readLine());
        String[] p = new String[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i ++)
        {
            p[i] = rr.readLine();
        }
        int[] diff = new int[]{0, 0, 0, 0};
        for (int i = 0; i < n - 1; i ++)
        {
            for (int j = i + 1; j < n; j ++)
            {
                int ans  = (p[i].charAt(0) == p[j].charAt(0) ? 0 : 1) +
                           (p[i].charAt(1) == p[j].charAt(1) ? 0 : 1) +
                           (p[i].charAt(2) == p[j].charAt(2) ? 0 : 1) +
                           (p[i].charAt(3) == p[j].charAt(3) ? 0 : 1);
                diff[ans - 1] ++;
            }
        }
        System.out.print(diff[0] + " " + diff[1] + " " + diff[2] + " " + diff[3]);
    }
}

any idea to make this approach faster? I've noticed that only a limited set of characters are allowed in input ('0' .. '9', 'a' .. 'f') so we can create arrays (memory limitation is enough) to do fast checks if characters have been entered before.

Thanks... I don't need actual implementation, just quick idea/thoughts would be great. EDIT: Thanks for great ideas. I've tried improvements on O(n^2) using bit-logics, but still time limit exceeded. The pascal code is below.

program Project2;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

var
  i, j, n, k, bits: integer;
  arr: array[1..65536] of integer;
  diff: array[1..4] of integer;
  a, b, c, d: char;

function g(c: char): integer; inline;
begin
  if ((c >= '0') and (c <= '9')) then
  begin
    Result := Ord(c) - 48;
  end
  else
  begin
    Result := Ord(c) - 87;
  end;
end;

begin
  Readln(n);
  for i := 1 to n do
  begin
    Read(a); Read(b); Read(c); Readln(d);
    arr[i] := g(a) * 16 * 16 * 16 + g(b) * 16 * 16 + g(c) * 16 + g(d);
    for j := 1 to i - 1 do
    begin
      bits := arr[i] xor arr[j];
      k := ((bits or (bits shr 1) or (bits shr 2) or (bits shr 3)) and $1111) mod 15;
      Inc(diff[k]);
    end;
  end;
  Write(diff[1], ' ', diff[2], ' ', diff[3], ' ', diff[4]);
{$IFNDEF ONLINE_JUDGE}
  Readln;
{$ENDIF}
end.

So I guess, I've to try other better suggestions..

EDIT: I have tried Daniel's algorithm and it is very promising, maybe there is a mistake in the code below, It keeps getting Wrong Answer on Test 10... could anybody take a look? Many thanks...

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

public class testtest
{
    private static int g(char ch)
    {
        if ((ch >= '0') && (ch <= '9'))
        {
            return (int)ch - 48;
        }
        return (int)ch - 87;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException
    {
        BufferedReader rr = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));
        int n = Integer.parseInt(rr.readLine());
        int[] p = new int[n];
        int[] all = new int[65536];
        int[][] miss = new int[4][4096];
        int[] g12 = new int[256];
        int[] g13 = new int[256];
        int[] g14 = new int[256];
        int[] g23 = new int[256];
        int[] g24 = new int[256];
        int[] g34 = new int[256];
        int[][] gg = new int[4][16];
        int same3, same2, same1, same0, same4;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i ++)
        {
            String s = rr.readLine();
            int x = g(s.charAt(0)) * 4096 + g(s.charAt(1)) * 256 + g(s.charAt(2)) * 16 + g(s.charAt(3));
            p[i] = x;
            all[x] ++;
            miss[0][x >> 4] ++;
            miss[1][(x & 0x000F) | ((x & 0xFF00) >> 4)] ++;
            miss[2][(x & 0x00FF) | ((x & 0xF000) >> 4)] ++;
            miss[3][x & 0x0FFF] ++;
            g12[x >> 8] ++;
            g13[((x & 0x00F0) >> 4) | ((x & 0xF000) >> 8)] ++;
            g14[(x & 0x000F) | ((x & 0xF000) >> 8)] ++;
            g23[(x & 0x0FF0) >> 4] ++;
            g24[(x & 0x000F) | ((x & 0x0F00) >> 4)] ++;
            g34[x & 0x00FF] ++;
            gg[0][x >> 12] ++;
            gg[1][(x & 0xF00) >> 8] ++;
            gg[2][(x & 0xF0) >> 4] ++;
            gg[3][x & 0xF] ++;
        }

        same4 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 65536; i ++)
        {
            same4 += (all[i] - 1) * (all[i]) / 2;
        }

        same3 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 4096; i ++)
        {
            same3 += (miss[0][i] - 1) * (miss[0][i]) / 2;
            same3 += (miss[1][i] - 1) * (miss[1][i]) / 2;
            same3 += (miss[2][i] - 1) * (miss[2][i]) / 2;
            same3 += (miss[3][i] - 1) * (miss[3][i]) / 2;
        }

        same2 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 256; i ++)
        {
            same2 += (g12[i] - 1) * g12[i] / 2;
            same2 += (g13[i] - 1) * g13[i] / 2;
            same2 += (g14[i] - 1) * g14[i] / 2;
            same2 += (g23[i] - 1) * g23[i] / 2;
            same2 += (g24[i] - 1) * g24[i] / 2;
            same2 += (g34[i] - 1) * g34[i] / 2;
        }

        same1 = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 16; i ++)
        {
            same1 += (gg[0][i] - 1) * gg[0][i] / 2;
            same1 += (gg[1][i] - 1) * gg[1][i] / 2;
            same1 += (gg[2][i] - 1) * gg[2][i] / 2;
            same1 += (gg[3][i] - 1) * gg[3][i] / 2;
        }

        same3 -= 4 * same4;
        same2 -= 6 * same4 + 3 * same3;
        same1 -= 4 * same4 + 3 * same3 + 2 * same2;
        same0 = (int)((long)(n * (n - 1) / 2) - same4 - same3 - same2 - same1);
        System.out.print(same3 + " " + same2 + " " + same1 + " " + same0);
    }
}

EDIT Finally got AC... thanks Daniel for such great algorithm!

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1  
+1 for introducing me to the puzzle solving site you linked. I've been looking for more programming puzzles. –  austin Nov 17 '12 at 23:23
    
no prob :), there are several other online judges. for example, www.codeforces.com but acm.timus.ru is my favorite –  DoctorLai Nov 17 '12 at 23:24
    
Ah yes, the memory limit precludes creating a 4 gigabit lookup table for each possible pair of pirate identifiers... –  Neil Nov 17 '12 at 23:48
    
@DoctorLai: check the solution i provided as well, it too got accepted after some re-formatting. Cheers! –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 20 '12 at 8:47
    
I see that @DoctorLai has the fastest solution so far for that puzzle! –  Neil Nov 20 '12 at 10:31
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9 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For small n, a brute-force O(n²) algorithm checking each pair is faster, of course, so one would want to find a good cut-off point for switching algorithms. Without measuring, I'd expect a value between 200 and 3000 due to not-even-back-of-envelope considerations.

Convert the pirate ID to an int by parsing it as a hexadecimal number. Store the IDs in

int[] pirates = new int[n];

First, count the number of pairs of pirates with identical IDs (this step can be omitted here, since there are none by the problem statement).

int[] allFour = new int[65536];
for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    allFour[pirate[i]] += 1;
}
int fourIdentical = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < 65536; ++i) {
    fourIdentical += allFour[i]*(allFour[i] - 1) / 2;
}

Next, count the pairs of pirates with three identical nibbles in their ID,

int oneTwoThree(int p) {
    return p >> 4;
}
int oneTwoFour(int p) {
    return (p & 0x000F) | ((p & 0xFF00) >> 4);
}
int oneThreeFour(int p) {
    return (p & 0x00FF) | ((p & 0xF000) >> 4);
}
int twoThreeFour(int p) {
    return p & 0x0FFF;
}

int[] noFour  = new int[4096];
int[] noThree = new int[4096];
int[] noTwo   = new int[4096];
int[] noOne   = new int[4096];

for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    noFour[oneTwoThree(pirate[i])] += 1;
    noThree[oneTwoFour(pirate[i])] += 1;
    noTwo[oneThreeFour(pirate[i])] += 1;
    noOne[twoThreeFour(pirate[i])] += 1;
}

int threeIdentical = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < 4096; ++i) {
    threeIdentical += noFour[i]*(noFour[i]-1) / 2;
}
for(int i = 0; i < 4096; ++i) {
    threeIdentical += noThree[i]*(noThree[i]-1) / 2;
}
for(int i = 0; i < 4096; ++i) {
    threeIdentical += noTwo[i]*(noTwo[i]-1) / 2;
}
for(int i = 0; i < 4096; ++i) {
    threeIdentical += noOne[i]*(noOne[i]-1) / 2;
}

But, every pair of pirates with four identical nibbles has been counted 4 choose 3 = 4 times here, for each of the possible selections of three nibbles, so we need to subtract that (well, not for the problem, but in principle):

threeIdentical -= 4*fourIdentical;

Then, count the pairs of pirates with two identical nibbles in their ID:

int oneTwo(int p) {
    return p >> 8;
}
int oneThree(int p) {
    return ((p & 0x00F0) >> 4) | ((p & 0xF000) >> 8);
}
int oneFour(int p) {
    return (p & 0x000F) | ((p & 0xF000) >> 8);
}
int twoThree(int p) {
    return (p & 0x0FF0) >> 4;
}
int twoFour(int p) {
    return (p & 0x000F) | ((p & 0x0F00) >> 4);
}
int threeFour(int p) {
    return p & 0x00FF;
}

allocate six arrays of 256 ints and count the number of pirates with the corresponding nibbles in places a and b, like

int twoIdentical = 0;
int[] firstTwo = new int[256];
for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    firstTwo[oneTwo(pirate[i])] += 1;
}
for(int i = 0; i < 256; ++i) {
    twoIdentical += firstTwo[i]*(firstTwo[i] - 1) / 2;
}
// analogous for the other five possible choices of two nibbles

But, the pairs with four identical nibbles have been counted 4 choose 2 = 6 times here, and the pairs with three identical nibbles have been counted 3 choose 2 = 3 times, so we need to subtract

twoIdentical -= 6*fourIdentical + 3*threeIdentical;

Next, the number of pairs with one identical nibble. I trust you can guess what four functions and arrays are needed. Then we will have counted the pairs with four identical nibbles 4 choose 1 = 4 times, the ones with three identical nibbles 3 choose 1 = 1 times, and the pairs with two identical nibbles 2 choose 1 = 2 times, so

oneIdentical -= 4*fourIdentical + 3*threeIdentical + 2*twoIdentical;

Finally, the number of pairs with no identical nibbles is

int noneIdentical = (int)((long)n*(n-1) / 2) - oneIdentical - twoIdentical - threeIdentical - fourIdentical;

(the cast to long to avoid overflow of n*(n-1)).

share|improve this answer
    
thanks... this is exactly something I am looking for. –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 15:08
    
Thanks Daniel, I've tried your approach, your algorithm is very promising, but there are something I miss here because it gives Wrong Answer to Test 10, and I've no idea where is the mistake... –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 11:18
    
Do you think it would be more efficient to make all the arrays length 65536 and mask out the unwanted nibbles rather than shifting the bits around? –  Neil Nov 19 '12 at 11:51
    
I doubt the difference, because in this case, we should loop 65536 elements to sum the counter. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 12:09
1  
@DoctorLai In same0 = (int)((long)(n * (n - 1) / 2) - same4 - same3 - same2 - same1);, you are casting too late. With these parentheses, n*(n-1) is calculated as an int, and that can overflow. I had (int)((long)n * (n-1) / 2) with the cast to long occurring before the multiplication. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 19 '12 at 19:02
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This might be a fast way to compare pairs of identifiers. It assumes that both identifiers have been read in as hexadecimal numbers rather than strings.

int bits = p[i] ^ p[j];
int ans = ((bits | bits >> 1 | bits >> 2 | bits >> 3) & 0x1111) % 15;
diff[ans - 1]++;
share|improve this answer
1  
are you sure this is correct? because I've tried your method, but it produces incorrect result. –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 0:10
    
@DoctorLai I only tried it on 0xdead, 0xbeef and 0xf00d. It returns 3 differences between the first and either one of the other two and 4 differences between the other two. Do you have an example of where you think it returns the wrong answer? –  Neil Nov 18 '12 at 21:01
    
Thanks Neil,, sorry, your method is correct... I have mis-understood before... However, still TL, check my latest edits. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 0:21
    
@DoctorLai Indeed, in the worst case the loop will execute almost 2^31 times. A 2GHz processor could do that in 1 second if the loop was empty, which doesn't leave much time left for actual code! (I hadn't noticed the time constraint before.) –  Neil Nov 19 '12 at 11:47
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How about this:

Create a 4-dimensional array of integers with each dimension being 16 elements wide with all the elements initialized to 0. So, that would be 16*16*16*16*4 = 262144 bytes, which is about 262KB. Now, index (insert) each of the identifiers into this structure as they are being read. When you are indexing, increment the counter at each dimension...

As you are indexing into this structure, you can incrementally calculate the the required answer.

For an example, let's say I'm indexing the identifier dead. On the first dimension, select the position corresponding to d, let's say the counter at this position is n1, this means that so far there have been n1 identifiers with d at position 1. Now take e and insert it into the correct position on the second dimension... and say the counter at this position is n2, then I know for certain that there are n1 - n2 identifiers which differ in 3 positions compared to the current identifier being inserted...

EDIT: I'm beginning to doubt myself. What if two identifiers are different in the first character but equal in the second? This approach will not be able to pick that up me thinks. Needs more thinking...

EDIT: After pausing on a "smart solution", I tried to improve upon the basic O(n^2) algorithm as below.

Each identifier has 4 hexa-decimal digits and therefore can be packed into a single integer (a 2 byte word would be enough though). So, such an integer would look like:

[ ][ ][ ][ ] * [ ][ ][ ][ ] * [ ][ ][ ][ ] * [ ][ ][ ][ ]

Where each [ ] represents a bit and each [ ][ ][ ][ ] group (half-byte) corresponds to a hexa-decimal digit in the identifier. Now we need a way to compare two of these identifiers fast. Given two identifiers a and b, first we calculate c = a ^ b, which will give us the XOR of the two bit patters (the difference, sort of). Now we compare this bit pattern c with the following constant patterns:

u = [1][1][1][1] * [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0]

v = [0][0][0][0] * [1][1][1][1] * [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0]

w = [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0] * [1][1][1][1] * [0][0][0][0]

x = [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0] * [0][0][0][0] * [1][1][1][1]

The comparison is like below:

diffs = 0

if (c & u)
  diffs++
if (c & v)
  diffs++
if (c & w)
  diffs++
if (c & x)
  diffs++

At the end of this operation, diffs will contain the number of characters from which a and b differs. Note that the same approach can be implemented without packing the identifiers into integers (i.e keep each hexa-decimal digit on it's own integer / char type) but I thought that the memory saved by this packing might mean something.

IMHO, this is only a minor improvement over the basic O(n^2) algorithm. I'd be pretty disappointed if the accepted answer is this sort of a trickery and not an answer based on a better algorithm / data-structure. Eagerly waiting for someone to offer some advice on such an answer... :-)

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exactly... i've tried similar approaches.. but it becomes complicated if you list some examples.. maybe O(n^2) is necessary. –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 2:00
    
I don't think these problems can be solved while sipping a cup of tea...(unless you are a pro). Probably there are thousands of ways one could get it wrong. But that's the beauty of it! Thanks for sharing this beast, now I'm hooked ;-) –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 18 '12 at 2:03
    
glad that you like it... yes... i love solving problems on ACM timus.. it is great fun. –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 2:12
    
I've appended the answer with a possible improvement for the O(n^2) algorithm. But I suspect that this problem has a solution that is better than O(n^2). –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 18 '12 at 11:18
    
Thanks... tried improvements on O(n^2) (see my edits), however, still TL. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 0:23
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This can be solved with a single pass through the id list, so O(n) time but you still need to be careful so that the implementation runs in time.

Consider the problem of finds pairs of equal Strings. This can be done by keep track of the count of each String previously found in a map:

long pairs = 0;
Set<String, Long> map = new HashMap<String, Long>();
for(String id:ids) {
    if(map.containsKey(id)) {
        pairs += map.get(id);
        map.put(id, map.get(id) + 1);
    } else {
        map.put(id, 1);
    }
}

Now to find pairs that differ in one character. You can store Strings excluding each character. So for "abcd", store ".bcd", "a.cd", "ab.d", and "abc." in the Map. For each id, you can add up the counts of each String, for each missing character position. This will also count equal Strings, so subtract the count of equal Strings.

Generalize to more missing characters using the Inclusion/Exclusion principle. For example, the count of Strings with 2 different characters from s is:

sum of all character positions `x` and `y`:
    the number of strings equal to `s` excluding characters `x` and `y`
    - the number of strings equal to `s` excluding character `x`
    - the number of strings equal to `s` excluding character `y`
    + the number of strings equal to `s`

For efficiency reasons, you don't want to do string manipulation so the actual implementation should convert the String to integers. Also, instead of a Map you can use a long array (where the index represents the String, and the value is the count of matching Strings).

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You have n!/(n-2)!2! = O(n2) pairs (n - number of inputs) and no matter what you do, you'll need to check them all since this is the requirement.

You can optimize the time by inserting the entire input into DAWG and traversing it later. For any 2 paths in the DAWG similarity is defined as a set consisting of the edges present in both paths. Construct this set and subtract its size from the path length to find a difference distance.

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are you sure? O(n^2) seems too slow.. because only checking difference of 4 characters in O(n^2) loop still takes too much time. –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 2:43
    
@DoctorLai Size of your input is n strings --> O(n^2) different pairs. No matter what you do, you need to check all the pairs. –  icepack Nov 18 '12 at 5:35
    
have you checked other suggestions? O(n^2) gives TL anyway. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 0:25
    
it's still O(n^2), the constant can be smaller though - e.g., if you use my suggestion –  icepack Nov 19 '12 at 6:25
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Instead of counting pairs, could you just count matches and then compute pairs? IE 5 codes that all start with d would actually be 5! = 10 pairs.

This would let you use a structure that could count position matches at insertion time instead of iteratively.

EDIT:

At the time I was thinking of perhaps having a tree structure with a root node and 4 nested levels. Each level represents one position in the code. IE root -> d -> e -> a -> f. As you insert each code, if that char doesn't exist at that level insert it, if it does tally it. At the end of each code insertion you will know how many matches that code had, which then gets added to the appropriate bucket in diff. Then convert to pairs rather than just matches by taking n! of each bucket.

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interesting idea... could you give more details? –  DoctorLai Nov 18 '12 at 2:47
    
expanded my post. let me know if that makes sense to anyone else besides me. –  thedan Nov 18 '12 at 6:02
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Can we map the privates number to one 3-dimension matrix P[x][y][z]?

  • x is the number of the privates (2 ≤ n ≤ 65536).
  • y is the identifer which is between 0 and 15 (0 - 9, a - f).
  • z will be 1 containing the opsition of the identifier (0 - f).

for example:

dead
beef
f00d

The according p[x][y] will be

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 a b c d e f

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1
1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

z demension will be

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 9 4 0 (2 -> 0010, 9 -> 1001, 4 -> 0100)
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 0 6 1 (6 -> 0110, 8 -> 1000, 1 -> 0001)
6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 8

We check p[x][y] column by column, if the 2 pirates have the same identifier, then we do one "&" bit operation between their positions and save the result (May need another matrix to decide how many times those 2 pirates matched before this new match in the current column, O(1)).

Traverse this matrix once would possibly be enough O(n).

Haven't proven by code, that's kind an idea. Hope it helps.

Thanks for this puzzle.

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This answer is an elaboration of the answers provided by @fgb / @Daniel.

Let's represent each identifier like H1H2H3H4 (four hexa-decimal digits)

  1. We have four arrays, each of length 16*16*16 (4096). These four arrays will be used to keep track of the identifiers which are equal at 3 positions.

  2. For each identifier read, calculate the values (integers) H2H3H4, H1H3H4, H1H2H4, H1H2H3 (Note that these values range from 0 - 4095; that is why we picked an array size of 4096). Now, use each of these values to index into the four arrays mentioned in step (1) and increment the corresponding position by one.

  3. We have another six arrays, each of length 16*16 (256). These five arrays will be used to keep track of the identifiers which are equal at 2 positions.

  4. For each identifier read, calculate the values (integers) H3H4, H2H4, H1H4, H1H3, H1H2, H2H3. Now, use each of these values to index into the six arrays mentioned in step (3) and increment the corresponding position by one. Each array position effectively counts the number of identifiers that are equal at 2 positions (Note however that this count will include the number of identifiers that equal at 3 positions as well).

  5. We have yet another four arrays, each of width 16. These four arrays will be used to keep track of the identifiers which are equal at 1 position.

  6. For each identifier read, calculate the values (integers) H4, H3, H2, H1. Now, use each of these values to index into the four arrays mentioned in step (5) and increment the corresponding position by one. Each array position effectively counts the number of identifiers that are equal at 1 position (Again, this count will include the number of identifiers that equal at 3, 2 positions as well).

Note that all of this can be accomplished in a single pass over the input. However, this is not enough to calculate the final answer, we have to incrementally calculate the final answer alongside steps 1 - 6. This is how we can do it:

diff1 = 0
diff2 = 0
diff3 = 0
diff4 = 0
  • In step (2), when we increment some array position, if the resulting value is u (u > 1), then diff1 = diff1 + (u - 1). This means that, with the (u - 1) identifiers that were already found, we can make (u - 1) new pairs (by pairing each of them with the current identifier).

  • In step (4), when we increment some array position, if the resulting value is v (v - u >= 1) then diff2 = diff2 + (v - u). This means that, we know a u number of identifiers have already been considered in the previous step, they should not be re-counted. So, (v - u) gives those other identifiers which equal to / differ from this identifier at only 2 positions. With those identifiers we can make (v - u) new pairs (by pairing each of them with the current identifier).

  • In step (6), when we increment some array position, if the resulting value is w (w - u >= 1) then diff3 = diff3 + (w - u). The explanation is quite similar to the one above.

Note again that all of these steps can be done during the single pass over the entire input.

Now, the next thing is how to calculate diff4. This can be done in step (2), when we increment some array position, if the new value is 1, then diff4 = diff4 + 1 and if the new value is 2, then diff4 = diff4 - 1. This keeps track of fresh identifiers for which no matching identifiers have been found so far.

UPDATE: The above approach works well, but the method I suggested for calculating diff4 won't work. Basically, diff4 is not about unique identifiers but how many pairs we can form by combining identifiers which differ from each-other at all 4 positions.

A different approach (for diff4) has been employed in the following implementation in C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

// forward declarations
__inline int update_same3 (int x1, int x2, int x3, int* map, int* diff1, int* overlaps);
__inline int update_same2 (int x1, int x2, int u, int* map, int* diff2, int* overlaps);
__inline void update_same1 (int x1, int v, int* map, int* diff3, int* overlaps);

int main () {
  // number of input identifiers
  int n = 0;

  // each identifier represented as four hexa-decimal digits
  int h1, h2, h3, h4; 

  // final answer
  int diff1 = 0;
  int diff2 = 0;
  int diff3 = 0;
  int diff4 = 0;

  int i, u1, u2, u3, u4, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, overlaps;

  // maps for keeping track of the identifiers
  int* maps [14];
  maps[0] = (int*) calloc (4096, sizeof(int)),  // h1h2h3
  maps[1] = (int*) calloc (4096, sizeof(int)),  // h2h2h4
  maps[2] = (int*) calloc (4096, sizeof(int)),  // h1h3h4
  maps[3] = (int*) calloc (4096, sizeof(int)),  // h2h3h4
  maps[4] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h1h2
  maps[5] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h1h3
  maps[6] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h1h4
  maps[7] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h2h3
  maps[8] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h2h4
  maps[9] = (int*) calloc (256, sizeof(int)),  // h3h4
  maps[10] = (int*) calloc (16, sizeof(int)),  // h1
  maps[11] = (int*) calloc (16, sizeof(int)),  // h2
  maps[12] = (int*) calloc (16, sizeof(int)),  // h3
  maps[13] = (int*) calloc (16, sizeof(int)),  // h4

  // main loop
  fscanf (stdin, "%d\n", &n);
  for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    // scan identifier 
    fscanf (stdin, "%1x%1x%1x%1x", &h1, &h2, &h3, &h4);

    // keeps track of the number of identifiers that the current
    // identifier overlaps with, required for calculating diff4
    overlaps = 0;

    u1 = update_same3 (h1, h2, h3, maps[0], &diff1, &overlaps); //h1h2h3
    u2 = update_same3 (h1, h2, h4, maps[1], &diff1, &overlaps); //h1h2h4
    u3 = update_same3 (h1, h3, h4, maps[2], &diff1, &overlaps); //h1h3h4
    u4 = update_same3 (h2, h3, h4, maps[3], &diff1, &overlaps); //h2h3h4

    v1 = update_same2 (h1, h2, u1 + u2, maps[4], &diff2, &overlaps); //h1h2
    v2 = update_same2 (h1, h3, u1 + u3, maps[5], &diff2, &overlaps); //h1h3
    v3 = update_same2 (h1, h4, u2 + u3, maps[6], &diff2, &overlaps); //h1h4
    v4 = update_same2 (h2, h3, u1 + u4, maps[7], &diff2, &overlaps); //h2h3
    v5 = update_same2 (h2, h4, u2 + u4, maps[8], &diff2, &overlaps); //h2h4
    v6 = update_same2 (h3, h4, u3 + u4, maps[9], &diff2, &overlaps); //h3h4

    update_same1 (h1, (v1 + v2 + v3) - (u1 + u2 + u3), maps[10], &diff3, &overlaps); //h1
    update_same1 (h2, (v1 + v4 + v5) - (u1 + u2 + u4), maps[11], &diff3, &overlaps); //h2
    update_same1 (h3, (v2 + v4 + v6) - (u1 + u3 + u4), maps[12], &diff3, &overlaps); //h3
    update_same1 (h4, (v3 + v5 + v6) - (u2 + u3 + u4), maps[13], &diff3, &overlaps); //h4

    // if the current identifier overlapped with n existing identifiers
    // then it did not overlap with (i - n) identifiers
    if (i - overlaps > 0)
      diff4 += (i - overlaps); 
  }

  // print results
  printf ("%d %d %d %d\n", diff1, diff2, diff3, diff4);
}

// identify overlaps at 3 positions
__inline int update_same3 (int x1, int x2, int x3, int* map, int* diff1, int* overlaps) {
  int idx = (x1 << 8 | x2 << 4 | x3);
  int u = (map[idx])++;
  if (u > 0) {
    (*diff1) += u;
    (*overlaps) += u;
  }
  return u;
}

// identify overlaps at 2 positions
__inline int update_same2 (int x1, int x2, int u, int* map, int* diff2, int* overlaps) {
  int idx = (x1 << 4 | x2);
  int v = (map[idx])++;
  if (v - u > 0) {
    (*diff2) += (v - u);
    (*overlaps) += (v - u);
  }
  return v;
}

// identify overlaps at 1 position
__inline void update_same1 (int x1, int v, int* map, int* diff3, int* overlaps) {
  int w = (map[x1])++;
  if (w - v > 0) {
    (*diff3) += (w - v);
    (*overlaps) += (w - v);
  }
}

I tested this with some sample inputs of my own and it seems to work. It would be great if OP can test this out and see if it works. It might need some more work.

UPDATE: OK, it works! had to re-format the code a bit to get it through the compiler over there. I have also updated the code listed here to reflect the changes.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice, but you forgot H2H3! –  Neil Nov 19 '12 at 11:39
    
Fixed, Thanks!. I can't imagine solving + coding this kind of a problem under one hour or so...!!! (may be through a lot of practice) –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 19 '12 at 12:32
1  
It is listed the second problem in "Open Ural FU Championship 2012 and the Division 2 of Open Cup Grand Prix of Eastern Europe 2012"..,.. there are 10 problems... so it is considered the second easiest problem... Those guys participating the ACM are genius. They are definitely pros.. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 12:39
    
I believe this is the optimal solution for this problem. I have edited my post according to this algorithm but there is an error I cannot spot atm, which gives Wrong Answer at Test 10. –  DoctorLai Nov 19 '12 at 13:37
    
Your code is more close to Daniel's answer (btw, you don't need the same4 loop, the problem states that all the identifiers are different from one another). On the other hand, my elaboration is mostly based on fgb's answer, note that with this approach you don't need any extra loops, just one loop for reading the input (all other operations are insertions / calculations which can be performed within that loop itself for each identifier read). –  Asiri Rathnayake Nov 19 '12 at 16:24
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could you try something along these lines:

as you process each entry add it to a list of names which have a particular letter in position one. Any entries in the list already to a list of '4 match candidates'.

Then add it to a list of names which have a particular second letter. Any entries already in this list are which are in '4 match candidates' remain in '4 match candidates', all other entries in '4 match candidate' are moved to a list of '3 match candidates' along with all entries on this list.

Then add it to a list of names which have a particular third letter. Any entries already in this list are which are in '3 match candidates' remain in '3 match candidates', all other entries in '3 match candidate' are moved to a list of '2 match candidates' along with all entries already in this list. Any entries in this list which are in '4 match candidates' remain in '4 match candidates', all other entries in '4 match candidate' are moved to the list of '3 match candidates'.

Then add it to a list of names which have a particular fourth letter. Any entries already in this list are added to the count of 1 match candidates, any entries in the '2 match candidates' list are added to the count of 2 match candidates, any entries in the '3 match candidates' list are added to the count of 3 match candidates, and any entries in the '4 match candidates' list are added to the count of 4 match candidates.

This should mean (hopefully) that you only process the list once and rather than check every other entry you only need to check a subset which have the same letters in the same positions.

Or maybe I need to go to bed...

EDIT:

So I misunderstood the aim last night. The above process counts the similarities not the differences, but we can use a similar approach to count the differences. Basically keep 4 lists for 1 difference words, 2 difference words, 3 difference words and 4 difference words. Add al words we have seen so far to the list of 4 difference words. Then start with a list containing al the existing names then look up the list of words which have the current words first letter in first place. Move al words in this list which are in the 2 differences list to the one difference list, the 3 differences list to the 2 differences list and the 4 differences list to the 3 differences list.

Once you have processed all the list you can add the count s in each list to the global counts.

I think this should work, but I'll ty it later. ..

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