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Iv'e been trying to solve this allocation/destruction problem for a significant amount of time as part of an assignment I got from school, basically I need to allocate a 2d array pointer of a simple class i designed.

class RobotsWorld{
public:
    RobotsWorld(int width,int hight);
    ~RobotsWorld();
    /**
     * copy,Assign,operator=
     */
    //RobotsWorld(const RobotsWorld &);
    //void Assign(const RobotsWorld &);
    //RobotsWorld& operator=(const RobotsWorld &);


    bool addRobot(Robot & r,Point p);
    bool moveRobot(Robot & r);
    bool removeRobot(Robot & r);
    Point getPosition(Robot r);
    string toString();

    Robot* getRobotInWorld(Robot & r);

    /** validation functions **/
    bool checkOutOfBounds(int,int);
    bool isEmptySlot(int x,int y);
    bool ableToMove(Robot &);




private:
    Robot*** robots;
    Point point;
    int width,height;
};

this is not the full source file of the functions but these functions causes the crash\memory loss. (and yes it has to be defined as a triple pointer - ***robots)

RobotsWorld::RobotsWorld(int width,int height)
:width(width),height(height)
{
    robots = new Robot**;
    *robots = new Robot*[height];

    for(int i = 0 ; i < height ; i++){
        robots[i] = new Robot*[width];
        for(int j = 0 ; j < width ; j++)
            robots[i][j] = NULL;
    }

}

RobotsWorld::~RobotsWorld(){

    for(int i = 0 ; i < height ; i++){
        delete [] robots[i];
        robots[i] = NULL;
    }
    delete [] *robots;
    delete **robots;
}

the robot class and the main got no allocation whats so ever. ive been trying to search for a solution but even describing this situation proved it self difficult.

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What is this: robots = new Robot**;??? Why not Robot robots[] = new robot[MAX_ROBOTS];? Or, even better, why not Vector<Robot> robots = new Vector<Robot>();? –  paulsm4 Nov 17 '12 at 23:32
    
You need 3 sizes to allocate memory for a 3d array. You only have 2 (int width,int height). It looks like you only need a 2d array. –  Sidharth Mudgal Nov 17 '12 at 23:34
    
The std::vector class can be nested, e.g. std::vector<std::vector<Robot>>. Using std::vector will make your life so much easier. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 17 '12 at 23:34
    
If you have access to TR1/C++11, you could use smart pointers in addition to vectors. That would make things easier. –  jt234 Nov 17 '12 at 23:34
    
You can also use template<int WIDTH, int HEIGHT> class RobotsWorld { Robot robots[WIDTH][HEIGHT]; }; and you do not have to handles new/delete operators ;-) However you have to implement some operator to handle RobotsWorld<3,4> rw34; RobotsWorld<5,6> rw56 = rw34; –  olibre Nov 17 '12 at 23:38

6 Answers 6

You need two nested loops to delete a 2D array of pointers - to delete individual robots, and to delete rows of robots:

RobotsWorld::~RobotsWorld(){
    for(int i = 0 ; i < height ; i++) {
        for(int j = 0 ; j < width ; j++) {
            delete robots[i][j]; // Delete each individual robot
        }
        delete[] robots[i]; // Delete the row of robots
    }
    // Finally delete the 2D array itself
    delete[] robots;
}

Although it is normally a good idea to set a pointer to NULL after deletion, doing so in the destructor is a waste of CPU cycles; I recommend skipping is.

This is a lot of work (as I'm sure you can see). Using the standard C++ library can help you avoid all this work by using a suitable container - say,

vector<vector<unique_ptr<Robot> > > robots;

Now the tasks related to managing the memory for your robots will be taken care automatically.

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make sure to add a if(robots[i][j] != NULL) before deleting the individual robot –  David Nov 17 '12 at 23:37
4  
@David delete is null-safe. –  Neil Nov 17 '12 at 23:38
    
@David One of the most beautiful things about delete (and also malloc's counterpart free) is that it null-checks the value passed into it for you. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 17 '12 at 23:40
    
Good to know, all those years I've been wasting time doing that check –  David Nov 18 '12 at 0:00
1  
I don't like the idea of deleting individual robots. I do like the idea of having robots being taken care of automatically. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 18 '12 at 0:02
robots = new Robot**;
*robots = new Robot*[height];

is incorrect, you want

robots = new Robot**[height];
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thanks you guys!!! I really appreciate all the quick, meticulous answers you all gave me..i can finally rap this baby up... –  mid-BSC Nov 17 '12 at 23:53

the last line:

delete **robots;

is most likely your problem. It should be:

delete robots;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick responses, but I guess i didn't specified it thoroughly, Its a requirement of the assignment that you use this triple pointer to induce a 2d array, how can I allocate\destruct it correctly? –  mid-BSC Nov 17 '12 at 23:44
    
actually I was just correcting a crash, use neil and dasblinkenlight's answers to fully correct your problem –  David Nov 17 '12 at 23:58

I cannot imagine why it would ever be necessary to have a T*** and Im certainly not able to maintain resources for something like this without helper classes! If I can't use std::vector<T> to help with the maintenance I wiould implement a similar class (well, it is easy for me: I have implemented my own version of the C++ standard library anyway...).

I haven't looked for all problems but the immediate oroblem is that you new robots** and treat the result as having more than element in robots[i].

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I copy my comment in this answer:

You can also use:

template <int WIDTH, int HEIGHT> 
class RobotsWorld
{
  public:
     /*... functions ...*/

  private:
     Robot robots[WIDTH][HEIGHT];
     /*... other private data ...*/
 };

And you do not have to care about new/delete stuff ;-)

However you have to implement some operators to allow:

RobotsWorld<3,4> rw34; 
RobotsWorld<5,6> rw56 = rw34;
if (rw56 == rw34) /*...*/;

If you do not need to allow operations as the lines above, then template is an elegant solution.

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You want to store a 2 dimension array of pointers to Robot. Here's a possible initialization routine:

RobotsWorld::RobotsWorld(int width,int height)
:width(width),height(height)
{
  robots = new (Robot**)[height];

  for(int i = 0 ; i < height ; i++){
      (*robots)[i] = new (Robot*)[width];
      for(int j = 0 ; j < width ; j++)
          robots[i][j] = NULL;
  }
}

The destructor should implement the dual operation.

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