Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Each site should have its own domain, database, settings.py, urls.py, views.py and so on. As far as I understand, it's impossible, but I don't quite sure.

EDIT: jdi suggests to use different settings files with different apps. Can you explain, please, how to do it? Additional problem is that I use Webfaction and after selecting existing Django webapp receive following error:

Site app with this Site, Path and Account already exists

So I need to know, is it limitation of Django or Webfaction. Version of Django is 1.3

share|improve this question
    
By "one Django instance" did you mean one codebase (or project), or rather one process / thread? – Tadeck Nov 18 '12 at 1:41
    
I mean one process. – DSblizzard Nov 18 '12 at 1:47
    
Can you explain why you would want to do this? There is no straightforward way to do this, and also.. no apparent reason to want to. – jdi Nov 18 '12 at 1:58
    
I don't want to install and configure third-party libraries each time for new site. And saving of cpu/disk also matters. – DSblizzard Nov 18 '12 at 2:02
1  
Your settings file does not have to be named settings.py. That is only the default. You can call it whatever you want, and then set that in your wsgi app, which your webserver will use to start the django instance. – jdi Nov 18 '12 at 2:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This project structure is for Django 1.4, though the concepts remain the same

You can do all of that, just not with a single process. Create a single virtualenv for your project, which can store a shared set of every lib you need. Then create different settings files for each site, which each load different django apps, all located within the project:

djangoProject
|- bin/
|- include/
|- lib/
|- manage.py
|- djangoProject/
    |- settings_site1.py
    |- settings_site2.py
    |- settings_site3.py
    |- wsgi_site1.py
    |- wsgi_site2.py
    |- wsgi_site3.py
|- site1_app/
    |- models.py
    |- views.py
    |- urls.py
|- site2_app/
    |- models.py
    |- views.py
    |- urls.py
|- site3_app/
    |- models.py
    |- views.py
    |- urls.py

settings_site1.py (example)

...
# or you could make multiple urls_siteX.py files in the root
ROOT_URLCONF = 'djangoProject.site1_app.urls'
...
INSTALLED_APPS = (
    ...
    'djangoProject.site1_app'
)

wsgi_site1.py (example)

...
os.environ.setdefault("DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE", "djangoProject.settings_site")
...

But to be perfectly honest... all of this is even much more easily accomplished if you just create a single virtualenv with multiple django projects. Then you don't have to much with segregating your apps:

projectEnv
|- bin/
|- include/
|- lib/
|- project1/
    |- manage.py
    |- project1/
|- project2/
    |- manage.py
    |- project2/
|- project3/
    |- manage.py
    |- project3/

Either way you do it, I don't think it is necessary to think about trying to get them all to run under the same single process. Django isn't designed to do that. It is designed to let you run multiple processes on the same project, for different sites, via the sites framework.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.