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do you guy know what it would be called to require users to input an assigned password in order to view your website? Like this site for example Click. I was thinking that it was .htaccess, but I don't want to protect any directories. I just want my friends to be able to log into my site without having to change my directory names for security issues.

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closed as not a real question by John Conde, Waleed Khan, Marc B, Ricardo Alvaro Lohmann, Graviton Nov 29 '12 at 2:55

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3  
The topic is so vast... There are many ways you can password protect your website. Obviously you want the password to be out of the source code available to the user. One way is to check in a MySQL database but you need to sanitize your input which can be tricky by itself. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Nov 18 '12 at 2:27
    
There are a hundred ways to go about this. The easiest method is to use something like Basic Auth or Digest Auth. These can be done with the server-side language of your choice, or be configured to be handled by your server directly. (.htaccess is just a server config file, by the way) If you want a web-based form, then you'll need to write specific code to handle it. –  Brad Nov 18 '12 at 2:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Apache htaccess sounds like what you need. The site you linked to has a bespoke site login which could be written in PHP or whatever the site is coded with.

It's trivial to setup Apache to do this though, first create a password with the htpasswd command:

    htpasswd -c .htpasswd dave

Then put this in the .htaccess file:

    AuthUserFile /full/path/to/.htpasswd
    AuthType Basic
    AuthName "My Secret Folder"
    Require valid-user
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Thanks for the help everyone. Gezpage, I understand your instructions relating to the .htpasswd, but how would I setup htpasswd -c .htpasswd dave? Like does this have to be done on my host or would it be file related. –  Evylent Nov 18 '12 at 4:07
    
Assuming you have console access to the web server, execute the htpasswd command above while in the directory you wish to save the password file, then specify this location in the .htaccess file so it will use the login/password from the created .htpasswd file when you hit the webpage. –  gezpage Nov 19 '12 at 11:39

It's generically called "login system" and it often requires also an username (not in your example though). .htaccess has nothing to do with it, it should be done in PHP or any other scripting language.

A login system usually requires some input validation and database skills. If you don't own them I highly suggest you to study something about PHP, XSS, Sql Injection, Mysql and PDO.

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Usually this is done with server-side scripting and a database. Javascript can't be used, because no matter how much you obfuscate the code, anyone can right-click and "View Source" to find out your password. I see you tagged php. In php, its rather simple. Setup an HTML form with a username and a password box that submits (via POST, not GET!, otherwise the password will show up in browsing history and the url bar). An example form would look like this:

    <html>
    <body>
    <form action="login.php" method="post">
        Enter your username: <input type="text" name="user" /> <br />
        Enter your password: <input type="text" name="pass" /> <br />
        <input type="submit" value="Login" />
    </form>
    </body>
    </html>

Then in login.php:

    <?php
         session_start();

         $db = mysqli_connect("server","db_user","db_pass","database_name");
         $stmt = $db -> prepare("SELECT pass FROM users WHERE username=?");
         $stmt -> bind_param("s",$_POST['user']);
         $stmt -> execute();
         $stmt -> bind_result($result);
         if ($_POST['pass']==$result)
         {
              $_SESSION['auth'] = "yes";
              header("Location: index.php");
         }
         else
         {
               die("Authentication rejected!");
         }
    ?>

Then all you need to do is place the following code at the head of all files you want to be "password protected":

    <?php
         session_start();
         if (isset($_SESSION['auth']))
         {
              if ($_SESSION['auth']!="yes")
              {
                  header("Location: login.php");
              }
         }
         else
         {
              header("Location: login.php");
         }
    ?>

This assumes that you have a MySQL database (Free and easy to install) with a table named users, which contains at minimum a user column and a password column. Its quite easy to figure out this code, and this is definitely not the only way to do it! However, this is a decent way, because it contains basic necessities (that you can read about elsewhere) like input sanitation.

Good luck! This truly is a massive question that is extremely important in computer security. In fact, its a billion dollar question: "How do I let the good guys in but keep the bad guys out?"

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The other suggestions are quite good, and are probably a lot simpler than this. However this does allow you to get your hands dirty a little bit, and isn't that much more work. Its always good to do something yourself! (Unless you're reinventing the wheel) –  John Davis Nov 18 '12 at 2:36
    
You should not be storing the passwords in plain text in the database –  Mike Nov 18 '12 at 2:59
    
I store the passwords in Sha1. Also, inside of my main directory I already have an index.php, and a login.php. I changed the login.php to inc.login.php, but how would I fix it to where both index are shown? –  Evylent Nov 18 '12 at 4:08
    
I agree about not storing it in plain text. However, as there are so many ways to encrypt the data, I leave that up to him. At the very least, md5+salt. However I do think its much more important to use prepared stAtements than to encrypt passwords, since encryption is only necessary in the event of a database breach. –  John Davis Nov 18 '12 at 7:58

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