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Functionally identical are using a callback to customize class behavior, and using a virtual function and inheritance. But I'm finding using function objects is slightly more flexible in my own work.

Customizing behavior using inheritance and many classes

class Animal
{
    virtual void onTouch() = 0 ;
} ;

class Dog : public Animal
{
    void onTouch() 
    {
        // all dogs behave this way.
        // to change I'd need to subclass, or add parameters.
        puts( "Woof" ) ;
    }
} ;

Customizing class behavior by instance by using function objects

struct Animal
{
    function<void ()> onTouch ;
} ;


Animal dog1,dog2 ;
dog1.onTouch = dog2.onTouch = [](){
    puts( "Woof" ) ;
} ;

Animal dog3 ;
dog3.onTouch = [](){
    // slightly modified behavior from dog1 and dog2, without
    // having to subclass, add members, or pass extra parameters
    puts( "Arr.. Woof" ) ;
} ;

Does anybody have a name for what I'm doing here or any reason not to use this

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1  
Are 2 different dogs going to react differently to the onTouch event? –  mfontanini Nov 18 '12 at 2:47
3  
The name is "javascript". Seriously, what's the point in having Animal if you're going to specify its behaviour per-object anyway? I like callbacks as much as the next guy but not for this; you're breaking the principle of least surprise IMO. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 18 '12 at 2:48
    
But it helps prevent the proliferation of many classes where each class only has a small change, and it's really flexible (the entire function is fully customizeable), without requiring you to code extra logic and pass tons of parameters to get the function to behave as you like. –  bobobobo Nov 18 '12 at 2:50
    
@bobobobo: ... which is fine in a top-level scripting language, but it breaks basically all of C++'s paradigms. Like I said, some callbacks are fine for handling the class's "events", but not for implementing the core behaviour of the class. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 18 '12 at 2:51
1  
@bobobobo You say flexibility, I say ambiguity. Next you'll be creating/maintaining factory patterns to properly instantiate your Animals, for basically no benefit. –  Alex Nov 18 '12 at 3:10

2 Answers 2

Saying that this is "slightly more flexible" than virtual functions is like saying goto is slightly more flexible than if/else. With your alternative you can:

  • Change behavior of an object on the fly (just by assigning a new object)
  • Mix and match behavior in classes that have more than one of these, and conversely never enforce that two related implementations are always used together in such a class.
  • Essentially make every instantiation of the class a subclass.

However, the function objects can not access protected members of "their" object, which may require that you break encapsulation on the host class so that the function objects can do what they need to do.

All in all, this seems like a good way to associate an object with external behavior that should be initiated by that object (e.g., a button click handler), but using it to extend the inherent behavior of a class seems like it creates more problems that it solves.

The most common example of a good use of this paradigm is for callback functions or event handlers, because the class is concerned with the mechanics of drawing the button and handling mouse events (for a button class), or with managing the network protocol (for a network socket class). In these cases, making the event handler virtual and implementing it in a subclass isn't good object-oriented design because the subclasses aren't conceptually new "types" of their parent classes, just like you shouldn't have to subclass a button to change its height and width.

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It allows minor customizations of a class without plethora subclasses. Think about HTML elements. Imagine inheritance were required. onclick, onmouseover, all could require you to "subclass" an HTML element type by defining your own HTML element tag names (e.g. <OkButton> extends <button>) then defining onclick in <OkButton> to do whatever you want. Or you could just use <span> and customize the behavior of each individual span by attaching a different onclick handler to the individual spans. –  bobobobo May 17 '13 at 20:56
    
@bobobobo I've updated my answer to emphasize that this is useful for specifying external behavior (event handlers), which is done for different reasons than defining a new type (which is what subclasses are meant for). –  Tom Panning May 20 '13 at 12:50
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This type of object customization is absolutely essential for object types that need to have different behavior, but do not differ significantly enough in basic structure to warrant subclassing.

This most often appears in Window element types that have OnClick type callback functions. If we subclassed the basic Button class every time we wanted different onClick behavior, you'd have about 70 subclasses of Button that all behave in exactly the same way, except for what happens when the onclick callback is fired (class OkButtonForMainWindowDialog, class CancelButtonForMainWindowDialog ..).

Bad inheritance example

class Button
{
    virtual void onClick( float x, float y ) = 0 ;
} ;

class OkButtonForMainWindowDialog : public Button
{
    virtual void onClick( float x, float y )
    {
        // Ok, so close this dialog box.. and commit the changes..
    }
} ;

Instead, we define the base class Button, and allow attachment of a function object that specifies onClick behavior.

Functor based example

class Button
{
    function< void ( float x, float y ) > onClick ;
} ;

Button okButton ;
okButton.onClick = []( float x, float y ){
    // do whatever's necessary..
} ;

Using callbacks like this is absolutely essential to prevent subclasses from multiplying like this.

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