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main function

main(){

    foo x=1, y=1, z=1;

}

header/class

class foo{

public:
    double a, b, c;
    double fn, val;

    // set a,b, and c
    void set(){
        a=1;
        b=1;
        c=1;
    }

    // constructor
    foo(double &f){
        set();

        // what I want to do here is say if "name of variable f" = "x", then do something
        // else if "name of variable f" = "y", do something else
        // else if "name of variable f" = "z", do something else
    }
};

As you can see in the main function, x, y and z all have the same value. I'm trying to write a conditional that deals with this case and one way I came up with it to check the variable names. Because I ALWAYS want to do the same thing for the object of class foo named "x", and always do the same thing for "y" and so on, no matter what those values happen to be.

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7  
You don't want to do this. –  Pubby Nov 18 '12 at 2:58
    
hmm, what is the best way to deal with this case then? I tried using if-else in the constructor but I couldn't think of a single way to make it work –  user1799323 Nov 18 '12 at 3:00
1  
the name or the label for a variable is considered a "special" Rvalue, it's really unsafe to manipulate it or use it as reference. I think that you should use a container like std::map. –  user1824407 Nov 18 '12 at 3:00
    
what about a constructor like this: foo (double f, bool flag) { set(); if (flag) { /* especial case for variable "x" / } else { / rest of variables */ } } And then you can initialize like your variables like this: foo x(1, true), y(1, false), z(1, false); –  kiewic Nov 18 '12 at 3:03
6  
I have a very sneaking suspicion that this is a symptom of a much larger problem. Why should a method care what the name of the variable it was called with is? It sounds like you just need to have more than one method. –  Corbin Nov 18 '12 at 3:05

3 Answers 3

You can't do what you are asking for in your question, there are a couple of ways to do something similar.

You can use inheritance.

class foo{

public:
    double a, b, c;
    double fn, val;

    // set a,b, and c
    void set(){
        a=1;
        b=1;
        c=1;
    }

    // constructor
    foo(double &f){
        set();
    }
};

class X : public foo {
{
public:
    X (double &f) : foo(f) {
        // do stuff for x
    }
};

class Y : public foo {
{
public:
    Y (double &f) : foo(f) {
        // do stuff for y
    }
};

class Z : public foo {
{
public:
    Z (double &f) : foo(f) {
        // do stuff for z
    }
};

main(){

    X x=1;Y y=1;Z z=1;

}

Or you can use an enumeration

class foo{
public:
    enum Mode{
        Mode_X,
        Mode_Y,
        Mode_Z
    };
    Mode mode;

    double a, b, c;
    double fn, val;

    // set a,b, and c
    void set(){
        a=1;
        b=1;
        c=1;
    }

    foo(Mode m, double &f) : mode(m) {
        set();

        switch(mode) {
        case Mode_X:
            // what I want to do here is say if "name of variable f" = "x", then do something
            break;
        case Mode_Y:
            // else if "name of variable f" = "y", do something else
            break;

        case Mode_Z:
            // else if "name of variable f" = "z", do something else
            break;
        }
    }
};

main(){

    foo x(foo::Mode_X,1), y(foo::Mode_Y,1), z(foo::Mode_Z,1);

}

You can use the preprocessor with the enumeration version to get the variable declaration closer to what you were originally asking for like this:

#define X(value) x(foo::Mode_X,(value))
#define Y(value) y(foo::Mode_Y,(value))
#define Z(value) z(foo::Mode_Z,(value))

main(){
    foo X(1), Y(1), Z(1);
}

Many people, myself included, would advise against using the preprocessor like this. I am only saying that it is possible.

share|improve this answer
    
hmm, thanks for the reply :) we haven't done any of these methods in class yet and I have to stick to what we've learned. Is there some way to number the instances of a call to the constructor? For example, foo x=1 gets counter 1, foo y=2 gets counter 2, and so on. I'm not sure if there's any way to store this as a variable. but I'm a bit restricted in my implementation by the teacher's rules –  user1799323 Nov 18 '12 at 4:14

What you're trying to do is called reflection (Wikipedia). Since C++ is a compiled, non-managed language it doesn't support reflection.

Also, when code is compiled in C++, the compiler mangles the variable names so the variables that you think you created (x, y, z) aren't named at all what you think they are and the new names have no meaning.

Unfortunately, when you're trying to accomplish by checking the name of a variable can't be done in C++.

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5  
The compiler doesn't mangle the names. There are no names of local variables in the object code (they don't have extern linkage). The debug data probably does have them, using the original spelling, but that's still useless for the purposes of this question. –  Ben Voigt Nov 18 '12 at 3:35

You mention in comments that you're writing a class to do partial differentiation. Here's a suggested starting point:

class Differentiator{
public:
    double a, b, c;
    double fn, val;
    void differentiateByX(double &f);
    void differentiateByY(double &f);
    void differentiateByZ(double &f);

    Differentiator(): a(1), b(1), c(1)
    {} // Note the syntax above for initializing members.
};

If it seems useful, feel free to change the return type of the differentiate functions, or to add members so that you can do

main(){
    Differentiator foo;
    foo.differentiateByX(1);
    // do something with the result
    foo.differentiateByY(2);
    // etc.
}

If you know you're always going to want to differentiate by X, Y, and Z, you could have a single Differentiator do all three with a single function, differentiate(double &x, double &y, double &z) or go back to doing all the work in your constructor: Differentiator foo(x, y, z);

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