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I am wondering under what circumstances do we extends an interface from an interface ? because for example

    interface A{
          public void method1();
    }
    interface B extends A{
          public void method2();
    }
    class C implements B{
          @Override public void method1(){}
          @Override public void method2(){}
    }

Isn't it equivalent to

    interface A{
          public void method1();
    }
    interface B{
          public void method2();     
    }
    class C imeplements A, B{
          @Override public void method1(){}
          @Override public void method2(){}
    }

Are there any significant reasons behind ?

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5 Answers 5

Yes there is: it's like inheritance anywhere else. If B IS A specialization of A then it should be written that way. The second one indicates that the class just happens to implement 2 interfaces with no relationship between them.

From the end result standpoint you could just use multiple interfaces in place of handling a hierarchy (just as you could avoid using inherited behavior in a class hierarchy). This would leave information more scattered, however, and as (if not more) significantly it obfuscates the intent of the software model.

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The significant reasons depend entirely on what the interface is supposed to do.

If you have a interface Vehicle and an interface Drivable it stands to reason that all vehicles are drivable. Without interface inheritance every different kind of car class is going to require

class ChevyVolt implements Vehicle, Drivable
class FordEscort implements Vehicle, Drivable
class ToyotaPrius implements Vehicle, Drivable

and so on.

Like I said all vehicles are drivable so it's easier to just have:

class ChevyVolt implements Vehicle
class FordEscort implements Vehicle
class ToyotaPrius implements Vehicle

And not have to think about it.

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What you are saying is right, but it's not just about getting our work done, what if the requirement is like this:

1) Imagine that there are 10 interfaces, not designed at the same time. For e.g. the AutoCloseable interface in Java 7. A new auto close feature was added, it was not there till Java 6.

2) If you designed an interface C which is a marker interface and you want all the classes derived from a given class B to be marked, the best solution would be to use B extends C and not going and putting the implements C everywhere.

There are many more reasons. If you look at the bigger picture of the classes and hierarchy, you might get the answer yourself.

Happy to Help Dharam

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Yes, there is one big difference.

In your first example, your new interface B is defined to extend from A, so going forward, any class that implements B automatically implements A. Basically, you're telling the compiler "here's what it means to be an A, here's what it means to be a B, and oh, by the way, all B's are also A's!" That lets you say things like...

class C implements B {
    ... you implement all of the methods you need...
    ...blah...
    ...blah...
}
A myNewA = new C();

and that works fine.

But, in your second example, you don't declare B to extend A, so the code above wouldn't work. When you try to assign an instance of (the second kind of) C into a reference for A, it would complain, because you haven't told the complier that "all B's are really A's."

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The main difference here is that in your first example B is A and then some. That means Interface B calls method1() and method2(), where as in the second one A and B are separate (interface B DOES NOT conclude method1()) and class C implements A and B. In both intances Class C will override method1() and method2(). I hope this helps!

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