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I am wondering under what circumstances do we extends an interface from an interface ? because for example

    interface A{
          public void method1();
    }
    interface B extends A{
          public void method2();
    }
    class C implements B{
          @Override public void method1(){}
          @Override public void method2(){}
    }

Isn't it equivalent to

    interface A{
          public void method1();
    }
    interface B{
          public void method2();     
    }
    class C imeplements A, B{
          @Override public void method1(){}
          @Override public void method2(){}
    }

Are there any significant reasons behind ?

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In the first case the coder of class C does not need to know the detail that B inherits A, he just needs to read the documentation for B. –  Hot Licks Oct 27 at 20:33

6 Answers 6

Yes there is: it's like inheritance anywhere else. If B IS A specialization of A then it should be written that way. The second one indicates that the class just happens to implement 2 interfaces with no relationship between them.

From the end result standpoint you could just use multiple interfaces in place of handling a hierarchy (just as you could avoid using inherited behavior in a class hierarchy). This would leave information more scattered, however, and as (if not more) significantly it obfuscates the intent of the software model.

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A & B are interfaces's. So, What does it mean when you say B is A. interface is discovered after concrete classes are designed. I feel extending interfaces comes out of the consequence of bad design. If you understand the meaning of inherit it does not make sense to inherit an interface. It make sense to inherit concrete class because they represent or show the nature of real world objects and you inherit that nature because SubType is also part of that nature. BTW, Can you give me an example in jdk on extending interfaces? i would like to analyse it. –  overexchange Dec 12 at 0:39
    
Concrete classes correspond to implementations of "real world objects" while interfaces represent their contracts or define what exactly should be "shown". In general if you have a class hierarchy with specialization of contracts then a corresponding interface hierarchy may make quite a bit of sense. I'm not going to research examples for you but I'd wager the Collections API is full of them. –  Matt Whipple Dec 12 at 0:48
    
So, when one says, public interface List extends Collection{} Do you mean, List is Iterable, Because List is Collection and Collection is Iterable? I think this is wrong. check this answer from oracle technician who knows the designers of collection. Basically my point is, It does not make sense to extend an interface from design perspective. –  overexchange Dec 12 at 1:25
    
That thread covers a particular instance which you're generalizing ambitiously. The underlying discussion is about the limitation of Java's single implementation inheritance, which is the underpinning of this whole conversation and the reason why although extensions using abstract classes and approaches like Template Method should likely be preferred they cannot be universal. Scraping off a single layer and evaluating extending Iterable alone is more representative. I would certainly say interface hierarchies should not be deep. –  Matt Whipple Dec 12 at 2:01
    
I did. I said it's out of context and generalized. The answer does not say that extending interfaces is bad practice, only that when specializations imply particular functionality that can be consistently implemented they should be handled as such rather than needlessly shifting the responsibility to implementors. I'm not saying the practice should be blindly adopted, but you're saying it should be wholly avoided so it's more on you to respond to the Iterable comment. –  Matt Whipple Dec 12 at 2:23

The significant reasons depend entirely on what the interface is supposed to do.

If you have a interface Vehicle and an interface Drivable it stands to reason that all vehicles are drivable. Without interface inheritance every different kind of car class is going to require

class ChevyVolt implements Vehicle, Drivable
class FordEscort implements Vehicle, Drivable
class ToyotaPrius implements Vehicle, Drivable

and so on.

Like I said all vehicles are drivable so it's easier to just have:

class ChevyVolt implements Vehicle
class FordEscort implements Vehicle
class ToyotaPrius implements Vehicle

And not have to think about it.

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What you are saying is right, but it's not just about getting our work done, what if the requirement is like this:

1) Imagine that there are 10 interfaces, not designed at the same time. For e.g. the AutoCloseable interface in Java 7. A new auto close feature was added, it was not there till Java 6.

2) If you designed an interface C which is a marker interface and you want all the classes derived from a given class B to be marked, the best solution would be to use B extends C and not going and putting the implements C everywhere.

There are many more reasons. If you look at the bigger picture of the classes and hierarchy, you might get the answer yourself.

Happy to Help Dharam

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Yes, there is one big difference.

In your first example, your new interface B is defined to extend from A, so going forward, any class that implements B automatically implements A. Basically, you're telling the compiler "here's what it means to be an A, here's what it means to be a B, and oh, by the way, all B's are also A's!" That lets you say things like...

class C implements B {
    ... you implement all of the methods you need...
    ...blah...
    ...blah...
}
A myNewA = new C();

and that works fine.

But, in your second example, you don't declare B to extend A, so the code above wouldn't work. When you try to assign an instance of (the second kind of) C into a reference for A, it would complain, because you haven't told the complier that "all B's are really A's."

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The main difference here is that in your first example B is A and then some. That means Interface B calls method1() and method2(), where as in the second one A and B are separate (interface B DOES NOT conclude method1()) and class C implements A and B. In both intances Class C will override method1() and method2(). I hope this helps!

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If you don't want B to be implemented without implementing A you can make B extends A.

Example:

Interface LivingThing{
public void eat();
}

Interface Dog extends LivingThing{
public void Bark();
}

It is possible to be a livingThing without being a dog but it is not possible to be a dog without being a livingThing. So if it can bark it can also eat but the opposite is not always true.

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