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New to Ruby, attempting to assign a given column to an array value that can be referenced inside a .rb file. Also, trying to learn, so trying to not use any shortcuts (homebrew solutions, etc).

file.dat

1  88    59    74          53.8       0.00         280  9.6 270  17  1.6  93 23 1004.5
2  79    63    71          46.5       0.00         330  8.7 340  23  3.3  70 28 1004.5
3  77    55    66          39.6       0.00         350  5.0 350   9  2.8  59 24 1016.8
4  77    59    68          51.1       0.00         110  9.1 130  12  8.6  62 40 1021.1

and more more rows like this.

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

input = File.open('./file.dat', File::RDONLY){|f| f.read }
array = input.lines.map(&:split)

It will give you a nested array, for example:

[
  ["1", "88", "59", "74", "53.8", "0.00", "280", "9.6", "270", "17", "1.6", "93", "23", "1004.5"],
  ["2", "79", "63", "71", "46.5", "0.00", "330", "8.7", "340", "23", "3.3", "70", "28", "1004.5"],
  ["3", "77", "55", "66", "39.6", "0.00", "350", "5.0", "350", "9", "2.8", "59", "24", "1016.8"],
  ["4", "77", "59", "68", "51.1", "0.00", "110", "9.1", "130", "12", "8.6", "62", "40", "1021.1"]
]

If you want numeric values in your array, use:

array = input.lines.map{|l| l.split.map(&:to_f) }

Which will leave you with an array like this:

[
  [1.0, 88.0, 59.0, 74.0, 53.8, 0.0, 280.0, 9.6, 270.0, 17.0, 1.6, 93.0, 23.0, 1004.5],
  [2.0, 79.0, 63.0, 71.0, 46.5, 0.0, 330.0, 8.7, 340.0, 23.0, 3.3, 70.0, 28.0, 1004.5],
  [3.0, 77.0, 55.0, 66.0, 39.6, 0.0, 350.0, 5.0, 350.0,  9.0, 2.8, 59.0, 24.0, 1016.8],
  [4.0, 77.0, 59.0, 68.0, 51.1, 0.0, 110.0, 9.1, 130.0, 12.0, 8.6, 62.0, 40.0, 1021.1]
]
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Can you explain the line of code that converts the nested array into a list? array = input.lines.map{|l| l.split.map(&:to_f) } What do each of the elements represent? Thank you so much. –  user1832897 Nov 20 '12 at 23:11
    
you can try out yourself by going through the line step by step. For example, input.lines gives you an array of the lines in input. map{|l| ... } then takes each element of the array (in this case a line), passes the current element to the local variable x and replaces the original array element with the result of the block {|l| ... }. Inside the block, the code takes a line l and uses split to split the line at whitespaces, thus leaving you with an array of the values in each line as strings. Finally, map(&:to_f) (equivalent to map{|x| x.to_f}) converts all values to floats. –  p11y Nov 21 '12 at 8:52

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