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I'm trying to convert 15:00 (15minutes) to seconds though I get 54,000 when I use this below.

I'm trying to convert 15minutes to seconds.

S = '15:00';
D = "1/1/1 "
s = ( new Date(D+S) - new Date(D) )/1000
alert(s);

Though when I do the math, it's 60 x 15 = 900. How do I get 900, since the time is a random string.

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1  
alert(s / 60); ... 900 –  Quintin Robinson Nov 18 '12 at 5:43
    
900 minutes are 54000 seconds... seems to be all good to me. –  Felix Kling Nov 18 '12 at 5:43
    
15 hours x 60 mn x 60 secs = 54,000......... –  dda Nov 18 '12 at 5:44
    
oh, no its 15minutes, not hours. 900 seconds is 15minutes –  1Rabbit Nov 18 '12 at 5:46
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well if your format will always be "mm:ss" you could dome string parsing and do the math manually, of course this would need to be adjusted depending on the input format.

S = '15:25';
var times = S.split(":");
var minutes = times[0];
var seconds = times[1];
seconds = parseInt(seconds, 10) + (parseInt(minutes, 10) * 60);
alert(seconds);​

Note in the example I explicitly added 25 seconds just as demonstration.

http://jsfiddle.net/Jg4gB/

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thankyou, this is what I eventually used. function TimeToSeconds(t){ var r = t.split(":"); if(r.length==2){ a = r[0] * 60; b = r[1] * 1; return a + b; }else if(r.length==3){ a = r[0] * 3600; b = r[1] * 60; c = r[2] * 1; return a + b + c; } } –  1Rabbit Nov 18 '12 at 6:13
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The time string '15:00' in JavaScript refers to the time of day 1500hr, or 3:00 p.m. American-style. That's 15 hours after midnight. That explains why you got 54,000 seconds.

If you wanted to express 15 minutes using your method of manipulating date strings, try '00:15:00'.

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voted twice for this answer –  Ibu Nov 18 '12 at 5:51
    
This better suits as a comment. :) –  Starx Nov 18 '12 at 5:51
    
Perhaps, but the little flyover on the "Add Comment" link says it should be used for asking the OP for clarification on the post. The OP seemed to be asking a direct question, namely "why do I get 54,000 when I thought I was expressing 15 minutes in a time string?" Since the question was very direct I thought an answer was better. No clarification on the question was needed IMHO. –  Ray Toal Nov 18 '12 at 5:56
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