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I've been looking for an answer to this for quite a while now, but it seems nobody ever got around this problem before. Maybe some of you are able and willing to help me out on this... that would be great!

Im currently working on a mysqli wrapper and trying to implement a custom result class for prepared statements like i do for standard queries already! It seems the result gets generated in the stmt's "execute" method but i still fail to understand what's going on behind the scenes!

Is there a way (or hack) to point the generated results to my result class instead of the plain mysqli_result like its done with regular queries?

Just to get you an idea, here's a little paste from the code :

class extended_mysqli extends mysqli
{
    public function __construct()
    {
        call_user_func_array(array(get_parent_class($this), 'mysqli'), func_get_args());

        if ( $this->connect_errno )
        {
            throw new extended_mysqli_exception('database connection failure');
        }
    }

    public function query ($query, $binds = array())
    {
        if ( empty( $binds ) )
        {
            if ( $this->real_query($query) )
            {
                if ( $this->field_count )
                {
                    return new extended_mysqli_result($this, $query); // select, show, describe
                }
                else return true; // insert, update, delete
            }
            else return false; // fix 
        }
        else
        {
            $stmt = $this->prepare($query);

            if ( $stmt->bind_array($binds) )
            {
                return $stmt->execute() ? $stmt->get_result() : false;
            }
            else return false; 
        }
    }

    public function prepare($query)
    {
        return new extended_mysqli_stmt($this, $query);
    }

    // ...
}

class extended_mysqli_stmt extends mysqli_stmt
{
    public function __construct($link, $query)
    {
        parent::__construct($link);

        $this->prepare($query);
    }

    public function execute()
    {
        //  what do i do here ???
    }
}

class extended_mysqli_result extends mysqli_result implements countable, iterator, arrayaccess
{
    public function __construct($link, $mode = MYSQLI_STORE_RESULT)
    {
        parent::__construct($this->link = $link, $mode);
    }

    // ...
}
share|improve this question
    
Not sure i understand you. What is the data structure that you want for the result? –  Ibu Nov 18 '12 at 6:05
1  
It's not about data structure... i just miss a lot of functionallity if i cannot use my extended_mysqli_result! let's say i wanna perform a $stmt->get_result(); The result i get is still a mysqli_result and not the extended one i wrote! –  Ivo Nov 18 '12 at 7:15
    
Why are you seeking to extend mysqli? What is it that you're actually trying to accomplish? –  eggyal Nov 18 '12 at 7:21
    
I miss some handy functions that are not implemented by default but could still apply very well to resultsets... as i am not in a php5.4 env, for example, having transversable resultsets could by nice! I used to perform queries not relying on stmts and i had some facilities in my framework that i am just not able to implement now that im trying to go with'em for security reasons! –  Ivo Nov 18 '12 at 7:34
    
Can you not just invoke the parent class's execute() method with parent::execute() and then handle the fetch calls as you wish? –  eggyal Nov 18 '12 at 7:46

1 Answer 1

Those classes were ment to be used as it is, so if you want your own implementation for mysqli you should write your own wrapper using mysqli_* functions.

mysqli Objects can be extended but this approach will ultimately fail if you wish to do any change to its structure or hierarchy.

Also, most of this methods trust your input data, so if you are trying to maintain a secure connection why not trying one of the 999 database abstraction layers out there and extending that code so it fits your needs?

share|improve this answer
1  
The abstraction layer was done even before i wrote the post in here... its just not possibile to change some of the mysqli_stmt class internals... i simply went with a mysqli_result decorator for doing that even though decorating is aprox 20-40% slower than extending a class... at least in php! :) –  Ivo Dec 6 '12 at 9:19

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