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trying to figure out the advantage of errno.

What advantage(s) do the C approaches (using errno or return values) to denoting errors have over the Java system based on exceptions?

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closed as not a real question by John3136, Miserable Variable, Dietrich Epp, Cheers and hth. - Alf, iammilind Nov 18 '12 at 6:36

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It's like asking whether you should walk to work or take the subway. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 18 '12 at 6:19
    
Generally, none. Disadvantages: forgetting to check error code results, mixed error-free and error-full code paths, etc... –  GManNickG Nov 18 '12 at 7:48

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There are no advantages except simplicity of implementation -- but only for single-threaded code. errno dates from before exceptions existed in any popular language.

EDIT: Nowadays errno actually evaluates to a macro that extracts a per-thread error state, so it's safe to use in multithreaded code (thanks Jesus Ramos and Dietrich Epp).

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Actually errno is defined percpu so it's actually thread safe. –  Jesus Ramos Nov 18 '12 at 6:16
    
@JesusRamos: Do you mean per thread? That would make it thread safe in the most important way. –  j_random_hacker Nov 18 '12 at 6:18
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It is per-thread. It doesn't look like it, but errno is actually a macro, and it defines to something like #define errno *get_per_thread_errno(). Note that most of the newer APIs avoid using errno at all -- like gethostbyname() and POSIX threads. –  Dietrich Epp Nov 18 '12 at 6:20

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