Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Each iteration of the following loop generates a vector of dimension 50x1 Id like to store all the vectors from the loop collectively in a single data structure.

  def get_y_hat(y_bar, x_train, theta_Ridge_Matrix):
     print theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape
     print theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape[0]
     for i in range(theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape[0]):
        yH = np.dot(x_train, theta_Ridge_Matrix[i].T)
        print yH

Which data structure should I use? Im new to Python but based on what Ive researched online there are 2 options: numpy array and list of lists

I will need to access each vector of 50 elements later outside this method. There could be 200 to 500 vectors I will be storing.

Could someone give me sample code of such a data structure as well

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Is there some reason not to be using a 2D numpy array? –  DarenW Nov 18 '12 at 6:17
    
Yes I would like to but,How would I append the yH value to a 2D array? –  banditKing Nov 18 '12 at 12:33
3  
In this case, storing a list of 1D numpy arrays is probably your best solution. Storing a list of lists will quickly become excessively memory hungry, and appending to a numpy array is inefficient. Often when building up a numpy array from an unknown number of smaller arrays, it's easiest (and fastest) to store the smaller arrays as a list and then stack them together at the end. –  Joe Kington Nov 18 '12 at 18:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

i suggest using numpy for that you need to install it

On windows from this site :

http://sourceforge.net/projects/numpy/files/NumPy/

some example how you can use it .

import numpy as np

we will create an array , we name it mat

>>> mat = np.random.randn(2,3)
>>> mat
array([[ 1.02063865, 1.52885147, 0.45588211],
       [-0.82198131, 0.20995583, 0.31997462]])

The array is transposed using verb 'T'

>>> mat.T
array([[ 1.02063865, -0.82198131],
       [ 1.52885147, 0.20995583],
       [ 0.45588211, 0.31997462]])

The shape of any array is changed by using the \verb"reshape" method

>>> mat = np.random.randn(3,6)
array([[ 2.01139326, 1.33267072, 1.2947112 , 0.07492725, 0.49765694,
         0.01757505],
       [ 0.42309629, 0.95921276, 0.55840131, -1.22253606, -0.91811118,
         0.59646987],
       [ 0.19714104, -1.59446001, 1.43990671, -0.98266887, -0.42292461,
        -1.2378431 ]])
>>> mat.reshape(2,9)
array([[ 2.01139326, 1.33267072, 1.2947112 , 0.07492725, 0.49765694,
         0.01757505, 0.42309629, 0.95921276, 0.55840131],
       [-1.22253606, -0.91811118, 0.59646987, 0.19714104, -1.59446001,
         1.43990671, -0.98266887, -0.42292461, -1.2378431 ]])

We can change the shape of variable using the \verb"shape" attributes.

>>> mat = np.random.randn(4,3)
>>> mat.shape
(4, 3)
>>> mat
array([[-1.47446507, -0.46316836, 0.44047531],
       [-0.21275495, -1.16089705, -1.14349478],
       [-0.83299338, 0.20336677, 0.13460515],
       [-1.73323076, -0.66500491, 1.13514327]])
>>> mat.shape = 2,6
>>> mat.shape
(2, 6)

>>> mat
array([[-1.47446507, -0.46316836, 0.44047531, -0.21275495, -1.16089705,
        -1.14349478],
       [-0.83299338, 0.20336677, 0.13460515, -1.73323076, -0.66500491,
         1.13514327]])
share|improve this answer
    
Don't confuse numpy arrays with numpy matrices –  Benjamin Nov 19 '12 at 12:29
    
thanks for feedback Benjamin . you are right. it is an array not a matrix , i modulate the word , and you can edit or modulate it if you feel and correct the mistakes ,thanks again. –  mazlor Nov 19 '12 at 15:35

I think storing the data from your loop in a dict and than convert it to a pandas.Dataframe (which are build on top of numpy arrays) should be an efficient solution, allowing you to further process your data as a whole or as single vectors.

As an example:

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

data = {}
# this would be your loop
for i in range(50):
    data['run_%02d' % i] = np.random.randn(50)
data = pd.DataFrame(data) # sorted keys of the dict will be the columns 

You can access single vectors as attribute or via the key:

print data['run_42'].describe() # or data.run_42.describe()

count    50.000000
mean      0.021426
std       1.027607
min      -2.472225
25%      -0.601868
50%       0.014949
75%       0.641488
max       2.391289

or further analyse the whole data:

print data.mean()

run_00   -0.015224
run_01   -0.006971
..
run_48   -0.115935
run_49    0.147738

or have a look at your data using matplotlib (as you are tagging your question with matplotlib):

data.boxplot(rot=90) 
plt.tight_layout()

example_boxplot

share|improve this answer

I can't comment on a numpy array as I haven't used one before, but for using a list of lists Python already has built in support.

For example to do so:

AList = [1, 2, 3]
BList = [4, 5, 6]
CList = [7, 8, 9]
List_of_Lists = []

List_of_Lists.append(AList)
List_of_Lists.append(BList)
List_of_Lists.append(CList)

print(List_of_Lists)

which would yeild:

[[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]

There are also others ways you can go about creating the lists instead of intializing them all from the start for instance:

ListCreator = int(input('Input how many lists are needed: '))
ListofLists = [[] for index in range(ListCreator)]

There are more ways to go about it but I don't know how you plan on implementing it.

share|improve this answer

You could simply do

import numpy as np

def get_y_hat(y_bar, x_train, theta_Ridge_Matrix):
     print theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape
     print theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape[0]
     yH = np.empty(theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape[0], theta_Ridge_Matrix[0].shape[0])
     for i in range(theta_Ridge_Matrix.shape[0]):
        yH[i, :] = np.dot(x_train, theta_Ridge_Matrix[i].T)
     print yH

if you store the theta_Ridge_Matrix in a 3D array, you can also let np.dot do the work by using yH = np.dot(x_train, theta_Ridge_Matrix), which would sum over the second last dimension of the matrix.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.