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I am trying to fit the log-log plot of the cumulative distribution of a network to one of three models: Exponential (EXP) (P(k)~e^(-ak)), Exponentially truncated power law (TRU) (P(k)~k^(a-1)e^(k/kc)), and Power law (POWER) (P(k)~k^-a). I know this is a low-information test, but I am simply trying to determine which of the three models is the best fit (or possibly the least terrible fit!)

I realize that TRU has 2 degrees of freedom, while EXP and POWER have only 1 degree of freedom.

I have the following data in R:

logCPK<-c(0, -0.0014, -0.0038, -0.0056, -0.007, -0.013, -0.0165, -0.0222, -0.0261, -0.0354, -0.0478, -0.0581, -0.0714, -0.0846, -0.1068, -0.1205, -0.1403, -0.1638, -0.1837, -0.2091, -0.2265, -0.2517, -0.2766, -0.3121, -0.3381, -0.3744, -0.4079, -0.4485, -0.4869, -0.5326, -0.5881, -0.6383, -0.6959, -0.7586, -0.8199, -0.8853, -0.9624, -1.0352, -1.1341, -1.2294, -1.3521, -1.4982, -1.6824, -1.892, -2.182)

dataPOW<-c(0.3387, 0.2175, 0.1197, 0.0441, -0.0198, -0.0777, -0.1262, -0.1717, -0.2108, -0.2482, -0.281, -0.3113, -0.341, -0.3673, -0.3921, -0.4167, -0.4387, -0.4607, -0.4806, -0.4996, -0.5187, -0.536, -0.5535, -0.5695, -0.5856, -0.6004, -0.6154, -0.6292, -0.6426, -0.6561, -0.6686, -0.6808, -0.6932, -0.7046, -0.7158, -0.7272, -0.7383, -0.7486, -0.7586, -0.7689, -0.7785, -0.7883, -0.7974, -0.8064, -0.8155)

dataEXP<-c(0.1981, 0.168, 0.1364, 0.1063, 0.0762, 0.0445, 0.0144, -0.0172, -0.0473, -0.0789, -0.109, -0.1391, -0.1707, -0.2008, -0.2309, -0.2625, -0.2926, -0.3243, -0.3544, -0.3845, -0.4161, -0.4462, -0.4778, -0.5079, -0.5395, -0.5696, -0.6012, -0.6313, -0.6614, -0.6931, -0.7232, -0.7533, -0.7849, -0.815, -0.8451, -0.8767, -0.9083, -0.9384, -0.9685, -1.0001, -1.0302, -1.0619, -1.092, -1.1221, -1.1537)

dataTRU<-c(-0.1867, -0.0857, -0.0193, 0.0204, 0.0443, 0.057, 0.0602, 0.0562, 0.0467, 0.0319, 0.0139, -0.0073, -0.0327, -0.0592, -0.088, -0.1202, -0.1525, -0.1881, -0.2234, -0.26, -0.2995, -0.3383, -0.38, -0.4205, -0.464, -0.5062, -0.5512, -0.5947, -0.6388, -0.6858, -0.731, -0.7767, -0.8253, -0.8719, -0.919, -0.9689, -1.0191, -1.0674, -1.116, -1.1673, -1.2165, -1.2685, -1.3183, -1.3684, -1.4212)

So my question is, how can I get the AIC values for the three models?

I have read, but not fully understand, the documentation for AIC{}, which has a general syntax of: AIC(object, ..., k = 2).

Not understanding what I am doing, I have tried commands in R, like:

AIC(logCPK~dataPOW) Error in UseMethod("logLik") : no applicable method for 'logLik' applied to an object of class "formula"

If you have any advise on how to calculate the AIC with the type of data I listed above in R, or any other software, I would be so, so, thankful!!

Thank you...

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should be able to give the name of the fitted model object in AIC, e.g.

fit <- lm(logCPK~dataPOW)
AIC(fit)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for a quick reply! Do you think I would need to do anything after this step to account for the differences in df? The TRU model has df=2, while the EXP and POW have df=1? Thanks again!! –  LanneR Nov 18 '12 at 8:34
    
The other thing is, I am unsure what I must fill in when reading about the "lm" documentation: [lm(formula, data, subset, weights, na.action, method = "qr", model = TRUE, x = FALSE, y = FALSE, qr = TRUE, singular.ok = TRUE, contrasts = NULL, offset, ...)]. Do I substitute "formula" with the formula for, say, dataPOW (which is P(k)~k^-a) and the "data" with the entire syntax (logCPK~dataPOW). How would I account for degree of freedom? Basically, I am misinformed when it comes to the syntax, is it possible to provide a concrete example with full syntax? :o) –  LanneR Nov 18 '12 at 8:41
1  
AIC should be taking into account the DFs. But, you would probably do better to compare the raw non-linear models using nls or similar. Then your DFs are built into the formula. –  Marc in the box Nov 18 '12 at 8:45
2  
Be a bit careful with using AIC to compare nls fits. AIC was designed to compare likelihood fits and not least squares fits. I have been advised not to use it for the latter. –  Roland Nov 18 '12 at 9:09
    
Thank you! I do wish to look at the least squares fits. Roland, What would you suggest to use if not nls? In any case, I tried using nls, as it was recommended by Marc in the box. I have the x-axis as such: [ k<-c(2.717, 3.0159, 3.2456, 3.4323, 3.5896, 3.7255, 3.8451, 3.9519, 4.0484, 4.1364, 4.2172, 4.2921, 4.3617, 4.4267, 4.4878, 4.5454, 4.5999, 4.6515, 4.7006, 4.7474, 4.7921, 4.8349, 4.8759, 4.9154, 4.9533, 4.9898, 5.0251, 5.0591, 5.0921, 5.1239, 5.1548, 5.1848, 5.2139, 5.2422, 5.2697, 5.2964, 5.3225, 5.3479, 5.3727, 5.3968, 5.4204, 5.4435, 5.466, 5.488, 5.5096)]. –  LanneR Nov 18 '12 at 23:54

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