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Just as the title says, can I pass a pointer to a function so it's only a copy of the pointer's contents? I have to be sure the function doesn't edit the contents.

Thank you very much.

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4 Answers 4

You can use const

void foo(const char * pc)

here pc is pointer to const char and by using pc you can't edit the contents.

But it doesn't guarantee that you can't change the contents, because by creating another pointer to same content you can modify the contents.

So,It's up to you , how are you going to implement it.

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I have to be sure the function doesn't edit the contents

Unless the function takes a const parameter, the only thing you can do is explicitly pass it a copy of your data, perhaps created using memcpy.

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Even if you use (const int *ptr) as parameter you can still change the value being pointed to (by creating a second pointer inside the function, for instance). The only way to be 100% sure it won't change is to pass a copy of the value indeed. Right? –  DanielS Nov 18 '12 at 11:24
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@DanielS If it creates a non-const pointer and makes it point to the contents of the const pointer it's stepping into undefined-behavior land. I.e. it's invalid code. –  cnicutar Nov 18 '12 at 11:42
    
I can't use const, I just want to make sure the function uses a copy of the contents passed via pointer. The memcpy looks like the best solution, can you show me the syntax, please? –  Mc128k Dec 2 '12 at 22:38
    
@HaskellElephant I don't understand what you mean. Care to expand ? I see many examples in the answer you indicated but I stand by my answer: if the function doesn't guarantee it - using const the right way or in documentation - the only way to be sure is to pass a copy. –  cnicutar Mar 24 at 11:33
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Yes,

void function(int* const ptr){
    int i;
    //  ptr = &i  wrong expression, will generate error ptr is constant;
    i = *ptr;  // will not error as ptr is read only  
    //*ptr=10;  is correct 

}

int main(){ 
    int i=0; 
    int *ptr =&i;
    function(ptr);

}

In void function(int* const ptr) ptr is constant but what ptr is pointing is not constant hence *ptr=10 is correct expression!


void Foo( int       *       ptr,
          int const *       ptrToConst,
          int       * const constPtr,
          int const * const constPtrToConst )
{
    *ptr = 0; // OK: modifies the "pointee" data
    ptr  = 0; // OK: modifies the pointer

    *ptrToConst = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the "pointee" data
    ptrToConst  = 0; // OK: modifies the pointer

    *constPtr = 0; // OK: modifies the "pointee" data
    constPtr  = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointer

    *constPtrToConst = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the "pointee" data
    constPtrToConst  = 0; // Error! Cannot modify the pointer
} 

Learn here!

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"In void function(const int* ptr) ptr is constant but what its pointing is not constant. hence ptr=10 in void function(const int ptr) is a valid expression." I don't think this is right. *ptr is read only in this case, so you can't attribute to it. –  DanielS Nov 18 '12 at 11:26
    
@DanielS : Yes you are correct –  Grijesh Chauhan Nov 18 '12 at 11:28
    
@DanielS: Thanks, I edited my answer. –  Grijesh Chauhan Nov 18 '12 at 11:29
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no problems, glad to help. –  DanielS Nov 18 '12 at 11:30
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I have to be sure the function doesn't edit the contents.

What contents? The value pointed to by the pointer? In this case, you can declare your function like

void function(const int *ptr);

then function() cannot change the integer pointed to by ptr.

If you just want to make sure ptr itself is not changed, don't worry: it's passed by value (as everything in C), so even if the function changes its ptr parameter, that won't affect the pointer that was passed in.

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Even if you declare the way you did the function can still change the value pointed by ptr. One could create a second pointer inside the function, for instance, attribute to it the memory address on ptr, and then change the value there. –  DanielS Nov 18 '12 at 11:22
    
@DanielS Well, if you have void func(const int *ptr) function, then writing *(int *)ptr = 42; is undefined behavior, so you're wrong. –  user529758 Nov 18 '12 at 11:52
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