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I have a char nom[100]; but when a nom's size is less than 100 I have to use padding. I use the char '.' to proceed. But when I read data I see for example a.txt..............................................................................................

How can I do to remove the padded '.' in C ?

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why do you must padding it? –  laifjei Nov 18 '12 at 12:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can either initialize your char *nom, like this:

char nom[100] = {'\0'};

Or insert a '\0' after the length you want the string "nom" to have, like this:

nom[5] = '\0'
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Thanks, It's what I want to do. In a tar file it's padded with \0 and I was searching to do the same thing. Now I initialize with {'\0'}; and it's doing what I want, and it's nice ! –  guillaume Nov 18 '12 at 12:45
    
You're very welcome! It's not much long ago since I learned this kind of initialization was available in C. Had to make it to C++ before using it in C. –  Rubens Nov 18 '12 at 12:47

you wanna TRIM the string at the ending:

int i
int paddedLength=strlen(str);
int realLength = paddedLength;
char padChar = '.';

for(i=paddedLength-1; i>=0; i--) {
    if(str[i]!=padChar)
        break;
    realLength--;
}
str[realLength+1] = '\0';
  • typed inline, no guarantees BUT the general approach works
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