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I broke my brain on it for a few hours, but need to carry on and found an ugly workaround, but I'd be happy to cleanup my code, here's the problem:

public static void function1(Map<String, Float> map)
{
    for(String key : map.keySet()) {
        Float val = map.get(key);
        // val is null here, throws NPE as soon as we try to use it
    }
}

public static void function2(Map<String, Float> map)
{
    Iterator<Entry<String, Float>> it = map.entrySet().iterator();
    while(it.hasNext()) {
        Entry<String, Float> entry = it.next();
        String key = entry.getKey();
        Float val = entry.getValue();
        // do something with key & val, works fine
    }
}

the argument Map<String, Float> map of course is correctly initialized and doesn't contain any null value.

on a side note, function1 works fine if I change the argument to Map map and use string pairs only. My goal is to to have only 1 function with generics Map<? extends Object, ? extends Object> map which I could use for both type of maps.

any suggestion appreciated, thanks! thomas


EDIT: I added some really basic introspection to make the function work with generics. I can confirm that I'm still getting null values when using the keyset, while I followed the suggestion below to use the entryset. here's my code below (the 1st function works fine, while the second returns null elements.

// yeah, it's aweful, but it works.
public static JsonNode map2JSON(Map<? extends Object, ? extends Object> map)
{
    ObjectNode dummyObject = Json.newObject();
    ArrayNode result = dummyObject.putArray("dummyKey");
    for(Entry<?, ?> entry : map.entrySet()) {
        ObjectNode mapElementNode = result.addObject();
        if("java.lang.String".equalsIgnoreCase(entry.getKey().getClass().getName())) {
            String key = (String)entry.getKey();
            if("java.lang.Float".equalsIgnoreCase(entry.getValue().getClass().getName())) {
                Float val = (Float)entry.getValue();
                mapElementNode.put(key, val);
            } else if("java.lang.String".equalsIgnoreCase(entry.getValue().getClass().getName())) {
                String val = (String)entry.getValue();
                mapElementNode.put(key, val);
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

// result here contains valid keys (the string part) and null values (the float part)
@Deprecated
public static JsonNode mapSF2JSON(Map<String, Float> map)
{
    ObjectNode dummyObject = Json.newObject();
    ArrayNode result = dummyObject.putArray("dummyKey");
    for(String key : map.keySet()) {
        ObjectNode mapElementNode = result.addObject();
        mapElementNode.put(key, map.get(key));
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this question
1  
How are Strings inserted while creating map? Could you post that snippet? –  Nambari Nov 18 '12 at 12:49
    
show the map data, If you can show full code...... –  sunleo Nov 18 '12 at 12:56
    
adding a snippet in reply to the answer below. I'm sure these strings aren't null because if I call map.toString() I can read the whole content normally –  gru Nov 18 '12 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

You probably inserted NULL key Strings into the map. This is possible when using a HashMap. Try to avoid adding NULL keys. Further you could use a TreeMap.

Bye the way it is not bad to iterate over the entry set, you could clean up your code by using foreach in function2 like you have done in function1:

This will look something like:

for(Entry<String, Float> entry : map.entrySet()) {
    Float val = entry.getValue();
}

Although it is not necessary to clean up function2. But you should find the location where you inserted the NULL key into the map.

share|improve this answer
    
hey, thanks for this answer, but I am 100% sure the keys aren't null. If I print the whole map with map.toString() it's working fine and I can see the content. posting below a snippet showing how I create map. –  gru Nov 18 '12 at 16:32
    
As I remember map.toString() implemented by Sun uses the same approach as your function2 (the entry set). Then obviously there is a NULL value in your map, which is alowed. In function1 you can add a line System.out.println("key=" + key + ", value=" + value); Then you will see the key that causes the null value –  AlexWien Nov 18 '12 at 17:05
    
hey, there is no NULL values in my map, I swear! :) please read my edit above with additional code that partially solves –  gru Nov 18 '12 at 17:18

function1 uses a foreach loop, which will throw a NullPointerException when the map is null. You should check the map to be not null before you iterate with foreach

Further You should rewrite the ugly

if("java.lang.String".equalsIgnoreCase(entry.getKey().getClass().getName())) {

to

 if (entry.getKey().getClass() == String.class) {
share|improve this answer
    
I like the ugly correction, thanks! and no, the map is not null (if you read my code above, below the EDIT, the 1st function works fine, the 2nd function gives null and they both use the same dataset) –  gru Nov 19 '12 at 11:15
    
In your code I don´t see any place where the map gets instantiated. Which code creates the map? But more important: Which class is the map? Is this a TreeMap or a HashMap or a self brewn or third party implemented map? (Put System.out.println(map.getClass()) as first line. In a comment before I suggested to add System.out.println("key=" + key + ", value=" + value); Please do that in function1 or mapSF2JSON to see what causes the NullPointerException. Further you could post the full stacktrace of the exception. If you found some answers usefull, please use the arrow buttons to vote up –  AlexWien Nov 19 '12 at 11:33
    
hey, thanks for comment. map is a treemap, created with the constructor accepting a comparator as argument, then fed with content coming from a hashmap with putall, none of the keys are null, I know it for sure. it's hard to trace back to the state where I had the exception at this stage, but you can see the deprecated function above giving null values, I don't need to run anything that throws exceptions. –  gru Nov 20 '12 at 23:13
    
You are hiding much information, but one thing is now obvious: –  AlexWien Nov 21 '12 at 23:05
    
You are hiding much information, but one thing is now obvious: Who has written the Comparator? and the hashCode() function. If they have been written by Sun they will work. If it a comparator written by yourself ist is likely that it will not fullfill the "equals" contract: It is not easy to write a class that corretcly implements equals, together with hashcode() They must work together. I remember of an colleague at my work, who had a similar problem, he said, thers a bug in java, but it was a bug in his equals, compare, hashcode(). For further Info on that topic see sun docu for equals –  AlexWien Nov 21 '12 at 23:12

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