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The collatz function http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collatz_conjecture is a function which takes an odd positive integer n to 3*n+1 and an even positive integer n to n/2. It is recursive so the previous value of the function is the input for the next value of the function. The Collatz conjecture says that no matter what the initial number (finite) there will be a finite number of recursions until the function first takes a value of 1. This number of recursions is called the stopping time of the initial value.

I want to produce stopping times for initial values 1 to 1000. With the output printing 'The stopping value for i is _' for 1<=i<=1000. Here is a my failed code for finding the stopping time for initial values 2 to 1000:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
for(long c=2, c<=1000; c++) // define stopping value as 0 for c=1 elsewhere
{
long count=0;

while (c!=1)
{
    if((c%2)==0)
    {
        c/=2;
    }
    else
    {
        c=3*c+1;

    }

    count ++;
}


cout << "The stopping value for " << c << " is " << count << endl;

}

return 0;
}

I know why this for loop fails as the c becomes 1 in the while loop. Is there a way to avoid this to produce a correct result?

Any help appreciated.

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1  
So the code you posted works fine, and the code you didn't post doesn't work? –  Pete Becker Nov 18 '12 at 13:11
    
Yes. The code I posted works. My aim in posting it was in the hope that there was something I could add to it to get the desired result. –  S F Nov 18 '12 at 13:53
    
Well, there are changes you can make to get the desired result. But nobody's going to do that for you. Try it, and if you can't get it to work, show the code that doesn't work. –  Pete Becker Nov 18 '12 at 13:57
1  
Walk through the code in your head and think about what the value of c is as you go through it, especially when it hits the top of the loop for the second time. –  Pete Becker Nov 18 '12 at 14:34
2  
One way to fix this is to use another variable. for(long s=2, s<=1000; s++) { long c = s; ... The problem with your code is that you are using c for two different purposes, the starting value and the current value. In my version the starting value variable is s, and the current value variable is c. –  john Nov 18 '12 at 14:42
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1 Answer

I can see a syntax error in the code above: there is a , inside the for loop where there should be a ;.

The main problem, as you have observed, is that the c variable is reset to 1 every time as the while loop is performed.

Probably the neatest solution would be to put the code for finding the stopping value into a separate function, and then passing your iterator variable. e.g.

long stoppingValue(long c)
{
    long count=0;

    while (c!=1)
    {
        ...
    }
    return count;
}

for(long c=2; c<=1000; c++)
{
    cout << "The stopping value for " << c << " is " << stoppingValue(c) << endl;
}

Alternatively, you could find a new name for your iterator variable or your working variable, and set the working variable equal to the iterator at the start of the for loop body.

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