Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a tiny C# application that writes bytes to a COM port:

SerialPort serialPort = new SerialPort
{
    PortName = "COM6",
    BaudRate = 57600,
    DataBits = 8,
    Parity = Parity.None,
    StopBits = StopBits.One,
    Handshake = Handshake.None
};

serialPort.DataReceived += delegate
{
    var read = serialPort.ReadByte();
    Console.WriteLine("Recv: {0}", read);
    Trace.WriteLine(read);
};

serialPort.Open();

for (Byte i = 0; i < 250; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Send: {0}", i);
    serialPort.Write(new[] {i}, 0, 1);
    Thread.Sleep(250);
}

Now I receive these signals with my ATMega328P and send back what I received:

void InitUart()
{
    // Enable receiver and transmitter
    UCSR0B |= (1 << RXEN0) | (1 << TXEN0) | (1 << RXCIE0);

    // Set baud rate
    UBRR0H = (UART_BAUD_PRESCALE  >> 8);
    UBRR0L = UART_BAUD_PRESCALE;

    // Set frame: 8data, 1 stop bit
    UCSR0C |= (1 << USBS0) | (1 << UCSZ00) | (1 << UCSZ01);

    // Enable all interrupts
    sei();
}

void UART_Send(char b)
{
    UDR0 = b;
    while ((UCSR0A & (1 << TXC0)) == 0) {};
}

ISR(USART_RX_vect)
{
    char b = UDR0;
    _delay_ms(125);
    UART_Send(b);
} 

But what happens is this:

Send: 0
Recv: 128
Send: 1
Recv: 129
Send: 2
Recv: 130
Send: 3
Recv: 131
Send: 4
Recv: 132
Send: 5
Recv: 133
Send: 6
Recv: 134
Send: 7
Recv: 135
Send: 8
Recv: 136
Send: 9
Recv: 137
Send: 10
Recv: 138
Send: 11
Recv: 139
Send: 12
Recv: 140
Send: 13
Recv: 141
Send: 14
...
Recv: 250
Send: 123
Recv: 251
Send: 124
Recv: 252
Send: 125
Recv: 253
Send: 126
Send: 127
Send: 128
Recv: 128
Send: 129
Recv: 129
Send: 130
Recv: 130
Send: 131
Recv: 131
Send: 132
Recv: 132
Send: 133
Recv: 133
Send: 134
Recv: 134
Send: 135
Recv: 135
Send: 136
Recv: 136
Send: 137
Recv: 137
Send: 138
Recv: 138
Send: 139
Recv: 139
Send: 140
Recv: 140

So it goes up to 127 then it is suddenly correct.

Somehow there is a 128 difference in the byte values, but I cannot get my hand on it.

Edit: after some more testing I noticed this:

Send: 0 (0)
Recv: 128 (10000000)
Send: 1 (1)
Recv: 129 (10000001)
Send: 2 (10)
Recv: 130 (10000010)
Send: 3 (11)
Recv: 131 (10000011)
Send: 4 (100)
Recv: 132 (10000100)
Send: 5 (101)
Recv: 133 (10000101)

I appears that the complements are different from C# and AVR C.

share|improve this question
    
You seem to receive nothing back for 126 and 127 too - or just an edit issue? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 18 '12 at 13:30
    
Are you sure, your settings are correct on both sides ? IE 8bits / parity ? –  px1mp Nov 18 '12 at 13:37
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever you are correct, there is no reply on these values. –  Rogier21 Nov 18 '12 at 13:44
    
I found a random manual on the internet for a different device (the mega644), but on that, you had to set USBS0 in UCSR0C to get 1 stop bit. If it's zero, it's looking for 2. Could it be the same for yours? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 18 '12 at 13:52
    
I actually just did that now, but no change unfortunately. –  Rogier21 Nov 18 '12 at 13:53

2 Answers 2

I had a similar problem in my project but I am new in c# (and VB), it is something about ASCI and ASCII. Your code in AVR seams fine.

What I did (in VB):

Dim byte_conv(10) As Byte

byte_conv(0) = Pg

...

comPort.Write(byte_conv, 0, 10)

In your case:

Dim byte_conv(1) As Byte

byte_conv(0) = i

comPort.Write(byte_conv, 0, 1)

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The solution was that I was using the wrong speed for the serial port thus the packets would not arrive properly.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.