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Part of a query I am not getting; what are these inner joins doing?

i have table speeldatum that have all data, in my project.below query are changing value of rownum column,how i do not understand. without having inner joins in query, rownum column have value of zero ,i have not proper understanding of mysql user defined vriable in query.

sample output(DO NOT CONSIDER ORDER OF ROWNUM VALUE)
...., rownum 0 ....

..., rownum 1, ...
..., rownum 2, ...

 from speeldatums  as t 
    inner join (select @rownum:=0) as r
    inner join (select @prev:="") as r2
    inner join (select @prevdatum:="") as r3**

complete query:

'create temporary table rr_prepare ( rownum INT NOT NULL, datum_unix 
   INT(11) NULL, categorie VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL, entry_id INT NOT NULL,

   INDEX(rownum), INDEX(datum_unix), INDEX(categorie), INDEX(entry_id) )
   ENGINE=MyISAM

   select t.*, @rownum:=if(@prev=t.categorie and
   @prevdatum=t.datum,@rownum+1,0) as rownum, @prev:=t.categorie as
   prevcategorie, @prevdatum:=t.datum as prevdatum

   from speeldatums  as t  inner join (select @rownum:=0) as r 
  inner join (select @prev:="") as r2 
  inner join (select @prevdatum:="") as r3 ';
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what would you like to achieve? –  John Woo Nov 18 '12 at 13:52
    
And what exactly is your question? –  a_horse_with_no_name Nov 18 '12 at 14:05
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1 Answer

The joins are introducing some variables and initializing them in the query.

You could also do that seperately in 2 queries:

set @rownum:=0;
select @rownum := rownum + 1, .... ;

But if you want to run only one query you can declare and init a variable on-the-fly in your query with a subselect

... inner join (select @rownum:=0) r ...
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