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Here is the code which causes a problem:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout<<"Base";
    }
};
class Der:public Base
{
    Base &pb;
public:
    Der(Base&b):pb(b){}
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout<<"Der...";
        pb.fun();
    }
};
int main()
{
    Der(Der(Base())).fun();
    return 0;
}

Run this code,and the result shows "Der...Base..."! This is so amazing, I can't figure it out why the result is not "Der...Der...Base" which is logically right?! Then I replace the member in class Der Base&pb with Base*pb and change the code into legal, finnaly the output is right which is "Der...Der...Base"! I debug the code and find that when I use Base&pb, the constructor of Der only ran once while use Base*pb, the constructor ran twice correctly! Any one who can explain to me what had happened and why?

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This code does not compile for me with multiple compilers and against both the C++03 and C++11 standards. –  David Hammen Nov 18 '12 at 15:00
    
@DavidHammen: Indeed, it's trying to bind a temporary to a non-const lvalue reference. One mainstream compiler supports that as an "extension". Conformant compilers require you to add const to the Der constructor argument and both fun functions. –  Mike Seymour Nov 18 '12 at 15:08
    
The original title of this question was "Some Problems Of Implemention In Decorator Pattern". I think that this is perhaps a better description of the intent of the question. –  David Hammen Nov 18 '12 at 15:12
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In Der(Der(Base())).fun() expression the inner Der(Base()) yields an rvalue - the compiler optimizes the code by using copy elision and removes unnecessary copying of objects.

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actually, it's not optimization: the compiler seems to treat the outer code as a cast, so we've got 2 objects and not 3. –  Vlad Nov 18 '12 at 14:22
    
@Vlad as far as I know function-style casting isn't applicable to class types (to avoid ambiguity such as this, I suppose). –  icepack Nov 18 '12 at 14:26
    
@Vlad: It is a copy-elision optimisation. Unless there's a suitable conversion operator, casting between class types creates a new object using the appropriate conversion (or copy) constructor. –  Mike Seymour Nov 18 '12 at 14:32
    
@icepack: function-style casting is applicable to all object types, and has the same effect as static_cast. –  Mike Seymour Nov 18 '12 at 14:35
    
@MikeSeymour So how does the compiler choose whether Der(Base()) should be the call to constructor of Der or should be the cast of Base() to Der? –  icepack Nov 18 '12 at 14:37
show 7 more comments

In addition to the @icepack's answer and the following discussion in the comments (summary: the code Der(der) is a cast, which may or may not be realized using constructor; in your case it's not), a workaround for you: you should make your intention clear by not using the constructor.

I would rewrite your code into something like this:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout<<"Base";
    }
};

class Der:public Base
{
    Base &pb;
    Der(Base& b) : pb(b) {}
public:
    static Der Decorate(Base&& b){ return Der(b); }
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout<<"Der...";
        pb.fun();
    }
};

int main()
{
    Der::Decorate(Der::Decorate(Base())).fun();
    return 0;
}

(outputs: Der...Der...Base).


Changing the code to accept the pointer is easy:

class Base
{
public:
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout << "Base";
    }
};

class Der : public Base
{
    Base* pb;
    Der(Base* b) : pb(b) {}
public:
    static Der Decorate(Base* b){ return Der(b); }
    virtual void fun()
    {
        cout << "Der...";
        pb->fun();
    }
};

int main()
{
    Der::Decorate(&Der::Decorate(&Base())).fun();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/13447109/… I posted today,and I find these problems are caused by compiler optimization.Thanks for your modification on the original code. But I'd like using pointer to replace the &operator to avoid this.Because I want to use the statements like "Der(&Der(&Base()));". –  Florian Nov 19 '12 at 4:06
    
@Florian: just updated the answer –  Vlad Nov 19 '12 at 10:15
    
@Florian: note that in my old code, Der(b) in static Der Decorate couldn't possibly be optimized out, since there is no implicit downcast Base -> Der. So that code should work in any compiler. –  Vlad Nov 19 '12 at 10:18
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