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I have 3 tables :

CREATE TABLE `t_event` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `title` varchar(100) NOT NULL,
  `kind` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `type` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `short_desc` varchar(500) default NULL,
  `long_desc` varchar(1500) default NULL,
  `location` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `price` decimal(11,0) NOT NULL,
  `currency` int(11) NOT NULL default '1',
  `remark_price` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `remark_prerequisite` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `date_start` date NOT NULL,
  `date_end` date default NULL,
  `date_remark` varchar(300) default NULL,
  `time_start` time default NULL,
  `time_end` time default NULL,
  `remark_time` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `leader` int(50) NOT NULL,
  `leader2` int(100) NOT NULL,
  `eve_contact_name` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `eve_contact_phone` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `eve_contact_email` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `eve_contact_url` varchar(150) default NULL,
  `eve_image_path` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `provider` int(10) default NULL,
  `timestamp` datetime NOT NULL,
  `last_change` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  `quality` int(10) default NULL,
  `min_number` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `max_number` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `active_for_reservation` tinyint(1) NOT NULL,
  `cancellation_day1` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `cancellation_day2` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `cancellation_fee1` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  `cancellation_fee2` varchar(255) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_event_kind` (`kind`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_event_type` (`type`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_location` (`location`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_currency` (`currency`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_leader` (`leader`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_provider` (`provider`),
  KEY `FK_t_event_t_quality` (`quality`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_currency` FOREIGN KEY (`currency`) REFERENCES `t_currency` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_event_kind` FOREIGN KEY (`kind`) REFERENCES `t_event_kind` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_event_type` FOREIGN KEY (`type`) REFERENCES `t_event_type` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_leader` FOREIGN KEY (`leader`) REFERENCES `t_leader` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_location` FOREIGN KEY (`location`) REFERENCES `t_location` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_provider` FOREIGN KEY (`provider`) REFERENCES `t_provider` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_event_t_quality` FOREIGN KEY (`quality`) REFERENCES `t_quality` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=8432 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

CREATE TABLE `t_location` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `loc_name` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `loc_detail` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `loc_adress1` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `loc_adress2` varchar(50) default NULL,
  `loc_country` int(50) NOT NULL default '1',
  `loc_zip` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `loc_loc` varchar(50) NOT NULL,
  `loc_shortdesc` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `loc_contact_name` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `loc_contact_gender` int(10) default NULL,
  `loc_contact_phone` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `loc_contact_email` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `loc_contact_url` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `loc_image_path` varchar(250) default NULL,
  `latitude` varchar(100) default NULL,
  `longitude` varchar(100) default NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `last_change` datetime NOT NULL default '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  `provider` int(10) NOT NULL default '1',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `id` USING BTREE (`id`),
  KEY `FK_t_location_t_country` (`loc_country`),
  KEY `FK_t_location_t_gender` (`loc_contact_gender`),
  KEY `FK_t_location_t_provider` (`provider`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_location_t_country` FOREIGN KEY (`loc_country`) REFERENCES `t_country`(`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_t_location_t_provider` FOREIGN KEY (`provider`) REFERENCES `t_provider` (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=1287 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

CREATE TABLE `t_dates` (
  `id` int(10) NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `events_id` int(10) NOT NULL,
  `events_start_date` date NOT NULL,
  `events_end_date` date NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY  (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `IND_id` (`id`),
  KEY `IND_events_id` (`events_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `t_dates_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`events_id`) REFERENCES `t_event` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=32048 DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

My Query is :

SELECT e.*,I.* ,d.*
FROM t_event AS e
INNER JOIN t_location AS I ON   I.id = e.location
INNER JOIN t_dates  AS d ON  d.events_id  = e.id
;

this query take 90s to be executed and return = 27727

The PROFILE command show that section "sending data" take almost the time of execution. The EXPLAIN command is the following :

+----+------------+------+------+----------------------------+--------------------+---------+-----------+-------+-------+
| id | select_type | table | type | possible_keys               | key                | key_len | ref       | rows | Extra |
+----+------------+------+------+----------------------------+--------------------+---------+-----------+-------+-------+
|  1 | SIMPLE     | I    | ALL | PRIMARY,id                 | NULL               | NULL    | NULL      |  1143 |       |
|  1 | SIMPLE     | e    | ref  | PRIMARY,FK_t_event_t_location | FK_t_event_t_location | 4       | wu_db.I.id |     4 |       |
|  1 | SIMPLE     | d    | ref  | IND_events_id               | IND_events_id       | 4       | wu_db.e.id |     3 |       |
+----+------------+------+------+----------------------------+--------------------+---------+-----------+-------+-------+

My point of view is that the big number of column is responsible of this slowdown but even when I write "SELECT e.id, I.events_id, d.id" it still take 16 s.

I think that I have to rewrite the query with LIMIT and OFFSET clause, what do you think?

number of records for each tables :

  • t_event = 7991
  • t_location = 1086
  • t_dates = 27727
share|improve this question
1  
Depending on the size of your database, the inner join is going to take a long time. Especially since you do it twice. Even with a LIMIT and OFFSET, it won't speed that up. How many records are in these tables? –  Kirk Backus Nov 18 '12 at 14:29
    
Welcome to stackoverflow! Thanks for posting a detailed question that included your own efforts to investigate the problem. –  octern Nov 18 '12 at 18:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Broadly speaking, MySQL can only filter records using one index from each table in a query.

That is, whilst your t_event table has indexes defined on both id and location, only one of those indexes can be used to satisfy your query. You can see this in your EXPLAIN output, which indicates that both the PRIMARY and FK_t_event_t_location keys were identified as possibly useful (with the latter actually selected for use).

Therefore, your join with t_dates, which involves a test on the id column, is being fulfilled with a table scan rather than an index lookup. Again, you can see this from the first row in the EXPLAIN output which shows type = ALL (table scan) and key = NULL (no index being used).

You should create a composite index on (id, location) for your t_event table:

ALTER TABLE t_event ADD INDEX (id, location);
share|improve this answer
    
Hi eggyal, Thank you very much for your detailed explanation. I have added a composite index on (id, location) for t_event table but the query still take 90 s to be executed. And I still obtain the same output for EXPLAIN command. I am convinced that the solution is in a composite index, may be we didn't make the right composite index –  Hamza Nov 18 '12 at 23:44
    
Hi Kirk Backus, the number of records for each tables : t_event = 7991 t_location = 1086 t_dates = 27727 –  Hamza Nov 18 '12 at 23:46
    
Hi eggyal, Thank you very much for your detailed explanation. I have added a composite index on (id, location) for t_event table but the query still take 90 s to be executed. And I still obtain the same output for EXPLAIN command. I am convinced that the solution is in a composite index, may be we didn't make the right composite index –  Hamza Nov 23 '12 at 22:23

My point of view is that the big number of column is responsible of this slowdown but even > when I write "SELECT e.id, I.events_id, d.id" it still take 16 s.

I think that I have to rewrite the query with LIMIT and OFFSET clause, what do you think?

I think you're right.

If you could speed up the JOIN by a factor of infinite, you would decrease to zero the "select" phase, and would leave the "sending data" part untouched - that's the other 74 seconds.

In other words, an infinite effort of query optimization would give you an advantage of 16 seconds out of 90 - around 18% overall.

If this is a batch query, then the time isn't so important; if it is not, as I believe, then I think it's really unlikely that someone is going to want a display, or even a synopsis, of some 27 thousands items.

Apart from a "paging" approach, or if a paging approach turned out not to be practical, or even in addition to a paging approach, you could see whether your application could use some kind of "filter" query (date ranges, location ranges).

So I'd study what WHERE conditions might be used to make that selection leaner.

If it is a Web application, you could SELECT only the IDs (the query you already tried, the one taking only 16 s; and with a WHERE, maybe even less), or as few columns as possible. Let's imagine that now you're displaying a very long page with lots of "forms" holding all the information, e.g.

...
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ...... Notes: ....  |
| Leader: .... Cost: ....                |
  ... and so on and so forth ...
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ...... Notes: ....  |
  ... and so on and so forth ...
+----------------------------------------+
...    

You could, instead, display only a very basic, minimal set of information, corresponding to the columns you have fetched:

...
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|
...

At this point, the user will be able to quickly browse the list, but almost certainly won't open all those forms, but only two or three. When the user clicks on OPEN, a jQuery function could issue a very fast AJAX call to the server, supplying the data with the IDs; then three separate queries would retrieve all the relevant data in milliseconds.

The data would be json_encode()d and sent back to jQuery, and the form would "open" displaying all the information in "accordion" fashion:

+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......       <CLOSE>|
| large form with all the information
| ...
| ...
+----------------------------------------+
| Date: ....  Place: ......        <OPEN>|

This way you would not need to immediately retrieve all the columns, especially those largish columns such as short_desc and long_desc, which can reach two whole Kb between them, and yet the user would experience very fast response.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Iserni for the response, could you please explain me more what did mean this sentence " Or if it is a Web application, you could SELECT only the IDs, and fill the other information using AJAX (particularly short_desc and long_desc).". And more especially "particularly short_desc and long_desc". Best regards –  Hamza Nov 19 '12 at 16:16
    
Done, let me know what you think. –  lserni Nov 19 '12 at 16:37
    
Thank you very much, now I understand how you proceed –  Hamza Nov 20 '12 at 14:19

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