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I am fairly new to servlets and the way I am handling repsonses from the client is using if uri matches a certain path such as:

public class EntryServlet extends HttpServlet
{
  public void doGet (HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
    throws IOException
  {
    String uri = request.getRequestURI ();

    if (uri.matches ("/1")) {
      do something....
    } else if (uri.matches ("/2")) {
      do something else.....    
    } else {
      throw error message...
    }
  }
}

This works only if my web service have a few pages. But say i have 50 xml documents and I want to map exmaple.com/1 to a xml ...to example.com/50 to another xml. Now it would be bad design to have 50 if else statements to handle each of the resource. What is a better way to implement this? I am trying to do this purely in java with no third party apps/plugins/frameworks

Update: I am working with only one servlet with a background thread. Essentially a client request to process a file and the background thread handles the processing and stores xml docs in a db. And I want have each of the xml docs to be a resource on the web service.

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what about switch-case? –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Nov 18 '12 at 15:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You gave the answer "I want to map", so lets use a Map

you have 2 options (that i see now)

1: you put the "/1" as a key and put a String as value that map's to your xyz.xml

2: you put the "/1" as a key and put an object that implements an "Executor" interface...

in both cases you lookup the value for the key and then use the value object to return something useful.

Put this in the init of your Servlet and fill it with your objects:

Map<String,String> myActions = new HashMap<String,String>();
myActions.put("/1","one.xml");
.....

Now you can do this:

String uri = request.getRequestURI ();

if (myActions.containsKey(uri)) {
   String value = myActions.get(uri);
   do something with value
} else {
   throw error message...
}

you can easily change this to option 2 by using object that implement this:

public interface Action {
    String execute(HttpServletRequest req, HttpServletResponse res) throws ServletException,
            IOException;
}
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The answer may depend on what you want to do with the information in the URI. When writing a REST style application, the URI is one of the primary ways that information is passed to your application. So if you may want to re-consider your aversion to additional packages since the REST APIs are very popular for good reason.

Sticking with plain Servlets, lets say we have 50 xml documents that we want to serve based on which id number is passed through the URL. We could store a table in a database that indicates the correspondence between id number and document. Or we could store this data into a CSV file. Either way, for such a relatively small table, I would just load the whole table into memory when the Servlet starts up. You can place code in an init() method for loading data into your application.

Then we have something like this:

static HashMap<Integer, String> fileMap;
public void init() {
    fileMap = new HashMap<> ();
    fileMap.put(1,"thing1.xml");
    fileMap.put(2,"thing2.xml");
    fileMap.put(3,"Otherthingy.xml");
}

Now you can write much cleaner code in your doGet method.

public void doGet (HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response) 
                               throws IOException  {
        String uri = request.getRequestURI();
        int slash = uri.indexOf("/");
        if(slash+1 == uri.length())
            //throw an error

        String idString = request.getRequestURI().substring(slash+1);
        int id = Integer.parseInt(idString);
        //should put this in a try catch block and throw an error if it is not a number.
        String requestedFile = fileMap.get(id);
        if(requestedFile == null)
            //throw some error.
        // Do whatever you need to do with the file.
}
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You should

  1. Move each URI specific logic into a different servlet.
  2. Use the servlet mapping concept from Java Servlet Specification and define the following in your web.xml

    <!- Define the servlets here, ofcourse you should use meaningful names -->
    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>servlet-1</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>com.vikdor.webapps.ServletForURI1</servlet-class>
    </servlet>
    <servlet>
        <servlet-name>servlet-2</servlet-name>
        <servlet-class>com.vikdor.webapps.ServletForURI2</servlet-class>
    </servlet>
    ....
    
    
    <!- Map the servlet to the URL pattern -->
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>servlet-1</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/1/</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-mapping>
        <servlet-name>servlet-2</servlet-name>
        <url-pattern>/2/</url-pattern>
    </servlet-mapping>
    ....
    

This will push the routing logic to web.xml and each servlet does a specific job.

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Use a framework. That's what they're for. I'm partial to Spring MVC but for a basic use case like this anything modern should be fine. It might feel like a pain to first get it setup but once it's configured development is much faster and much more maintainable.

Edit: I just noticed the original question says not to use any frameworks/libraries. I still stick by this answer though as the majority of the time that's a bad idea. If you really have to then you can create Maps as suggested by a few other people but in the long run it's not maintainable so avoid it while you can.

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You can specify in your web.xml uri patterns to route to specific servlet classes. Forgive my bad servlet names.

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>processUserXml</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.example.server.ProcessUserXml</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>processUserXml</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/processuser</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

<servlet>
    <servlet-name>processItemXml</servlet-name>
    <servlet-class>com.example.server.ProcessItemXml</servlet-class>
</servlet>
<servlet-mapping>
    <servlet-name>processItemXml</servlet-name>
    <url-pattern>/processitem</url-pattern>
</servlet-mapping>

So instead of accepting uri requests from a single gateway and routing them through if statements (as you're doing now), when a user calls a specific uri, it'll get routed to the appropriate servlet class for you. So calling uri /processuser will route the call to the ProcessUserXml servlet class doGet method (or doPost, if it's defined and that's how the user made the HTTP call).

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to specify but I am only dealing with one servlet here. –  Dan Nov 18 '12 at 15:26
    
Why does it have to be one servlet? The actions you're looking to perform could in essence become their own servlet. –  Neeko Nov 18 '12 at 15:30

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