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I have this code here that I think should work, and it does! except for the fact that though I've declared a pointer to an array of type double, it always stores int, and I don't know why.

first, I have this struct and it is defined like this:

struct thing {
    int part1;
    double *part2;
};

then I initialize the thing by saying struct thing *abc = malloc (sizeof(struct thing)) and part1 = 0 and part2 = malloc(sizeof(double)).

then, I try to set specific values at specific positions in the array of double. This works fine with integers, but when I tried 0.5, it set the value to 0. when I tried 2.9, it set the value to 2. I really don't know why it does this. code for setValue looks like this:

struct thing *setValue (struct thing *t, int pos, double set){
    if (t->part1 < pos){ // check to see if array is large enough
        t->part2 = realloc (t->part2, (pos+1) * sizeof(double));
        for (int a = t->part1 + 1; a < pos + 1; a++)
            t->part2[a] = 0;
    t->part1 = pos;
    }
    t->part2[pos] = set; // ALWAYS stores an integer, don't know why
    return t;
}

-- Edit: So there is nothing really mallicious about this part; but here's the rest of my code JUST IN CASE:

Relevant functions that operate on my struct thing

#include "thing.h"
#include <math.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct thing *makeThing(){ // GOOD
    struct thing *t = (struct thing *) malloc (sizeof(struct thing));
    t->part1 = 0;
    t->part2 = malloc (sizeof(double));
    t->part2[0] = 0;
    return t;
}

struct thing *setValue (struct thing *t, int pos, double set){
    if (t->part1 < pos){ // check to see if array is large enough
        t->part2 = realloc (t->part2, (pos+1) * sizeof(double));
        for (int a = t->part1 + 1; a < pos + 1; a++)
            t->part2[a] = 0;
    t->part1 = pos;
    }
    t->part2[pos] = set; // ALWAYS stores an integer, don't know why
    return t;
}

double getValue (struct thing *t, int pos){
    if (pos <= t->part1){
        return t->part2[pos];
    }
    return 0;
}

Header file:

#ifndef THING_H
#define THING_H

struct thing {
    int part1;
    double *part2;
};

struct thing *makeThing();
struct thing *setValue (struct thing *t, int pos, double set);
double getValue (struct thing *t, int pos);

#endif

main file:

#include <stdio.h>
#include "thing.h"

int main (void)
{
    struct thing *t = makeThing();
    setValue (t, 1, -1);
    setValue (t, 1, -2);
    setValue (t, 10, 1);
    setValue (t, 3, 1.5);

    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 0));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 1));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 2));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 3));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 4));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 5));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 6));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 7));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 8));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 9));
    printf ("%g\n", getValue (t, 10));

    return 0;
}

On my computer, this prints out: 0 -2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

EDIT: Turns out that when I compile it via codeblocks, it works...

Ultimately, I am confused.

share|improve this question
5  
It would be a good idea to accept some answers. :-) –  md5 Nov 18 '12 at 15:17
4  
Could it be because of your printing statement? –  nhahtdh Nov 18 '12 at 15:19
    
yep, how are you printing the values? –  Rubens Nov 18 '12 at 15:22
4  
Your code works well at ideone. –  pmg Nov 18 '12 at 15:26
1  
Where is setValue() called? Is the prototype visible there? Have you compiled with warnings enabled? –  ninjalj Nov 18 '12 at 15:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Double converts to int in C?

No, it doesn't. When you assign a double value to an object ot type double there is no conversion whatsoever.

Your problem is not in the code you've shown; it is somewhere else (the way you print, some stupid #define, some other thing).

Oh! And you really should make sure the realloc()s work. Otherwise, instead of an error, users may get a slightly erroneous value...

As I said in a comment, your code works as expected at ideone.

share|improve this answer
    
I accepted the answer because I thought I had messed up a define in the header - but when I changed it it still didn't work, so I expanded the code. –  SSaaM Nov 18 '12 at 16:20
    
Are you using separate compilation? Meaning are you only compiling the source code with main() and linking to an old version of the functions that deal with struct thing? I can't see anything wrong in your code (and it works for me with gcc 4.7.1). The cast to the return value of malloc() is redundant (provided the #include <stdlib.h> is in place); I prefer to use the object itself as argument to the sizeof operator to avoid errors with wrong types (sizeof *t->part2 for instance). –  pmg Nov 18 '12 at 17:16
    
So, basically, I figured out that if I compile it with an IDE (in this case, CodeBlock), it works, but when I try to compile from the command line, it does not work. :/ –  SSaaM Nov 18 '12 at 17:19
    
Delete everything, in all directories, except the source code (.o files, .exe files, .lib files, ..., maybe keep .bak and/or .prj files ...) and try again with the command line compiler. I suspect you're using mismatched source and object files. –  pmg Nov 18 '12 at 17:22
    
Sorry for late accept. Esssentially your last comment there was correct. –  SSaaM Jul 16 '13 at 15:21

I think you might have messed up your format specifier in your printing. Be sure to have the correct specifiers for the correct data types.

I know that happened to me sometimes when I changed data types in my Objective-C code. :)

share|improve this answer
    
%g is correct, it prints a double in standard or scientific notation, depending on its magnitude. –  Kevin Jun 26 '13 at 16:49
    
@Kevin is double not %f? –  code Jun 27 '13 at 8:23
    
%f also prints a double, but always in standard notation (100000000, c.f. %g would print that as 1e8) –  Kevin Jun 27 '13 at 12:12

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