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Some of my model properties are marked by AllowHtml attribute. Is there any way to automatically apply AntiXss protection (i. e. filter only allowed tags) to these fields?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no automatic way. The closest you can do is to get AntiXss Nuget package. Then you can use it like below in your controller :

  Microsoft.Security.Application.Sanitizer.GetSafeHtml("YourHtml");

OR

  Microsoft.Security.Application.Encoder.HtmlEncode("YourHtml");

If you use you can decode it using

  Server.HtmlDecode("HtmlEncodedString");

Hope this helps.

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First, afaik, nothing is built-in for that. But MVC allows to do such things easily via custom ModelBinders, you could define your

public class CustomAntiXssAttribute : Attribute { }

and decorate your properties with it (and even inherit from AllowHtmlAttribute if you wish). Then with a model binder you could add your specific anti-xss protection:

    public class CutstomModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
    {
        protected override void BindProperty(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, System.ComponentModel.PropertyDescriptor propertyDescriptor)
        {
            if (propertyDescriptor.Attributes.OfType<CustomAntiXssAttribute>().Any())
            {
                var valueResult = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(propertyDescriptor.Name);
                var filteredValue = SOME_CUSTOM_FILTER_FUNCTION_HERE(valueResult.AttemptedValue);
                propertyDescriptor.SetValue(bindingContext.Model, filteredValue);
            }
            else // revert to the default behavior.
            {
                base.BindProperty(controllerContext, bindingContext, propertyDescriptor);
            }
        }
    }

Then inside that SOME_CUSTOM_FILTER_FUNCTION_HERE you could use what @Yogiraj suggested, or use a Regexp, or even apply HtmlAgilityPack-based filtering.

P.S. Don't forget to add ModelBinders.Binders.DefaultBinder = new CutstomModelBinder(); to Application_Start (I forgot :))

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1  
YOU CAN'T INHERIT FROM ALLOWHTMLATTRIBUTE "IT'S A SEALED CLASS" –  Mark Nov 26 '12 at 11:47

Untested Code,

public class ADefaultModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    public override object BindModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext)
    {
        if (bindingContext.ModelMetadata.RequestValidationEnabled)
        {
            var value = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(bindingContext.ModelName).AttemptedValue;
            value = value.Replace("&", "");// replace existing & from the value
            var encodedValue = Microsoft.Security.Application.Encoder.HtmlEncode(value);
            bindingContext.ModelMetadata.RequestValidationEnabled = encodedValue.Contains("&"); // Whether AntiXss encoded a char to &..
        }
        return base.BindModel(controllerContext, bindingContext);
    }
}
public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        ModelBinders.Binders.DefaultBinder = new ADefaultModelBinder();
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I would go for replacing those AllowHtml attributes with RegularExpression data-annotation validations. The advantage is by this way you can trap the error and show to the user what went wrong while the former one fires the error at a global level.

For ex.

public class MyViewModel
{
    [DataType(DataType.MultilineText)]
    [RegularExpression(@"^[^\<\>]*$", ErrorMessage = "May not contain <,>")]
    public string Text { get; set; }
}

Ref: RegularExpression validator encoding regex < & > symbols as &lt; &gt;, causing jQuery validation to fail

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