Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I tried the following approach:

import System.Exit
import System.Posix.Signals
import Control.Concurrent (threadDelay)

main :: IO ()
main = do
  installHandler keyboardSignal (Catch (do exitSuccess)) Nothing
  threadDelay (1000000000)

But it only outputs:

^CTest.hs: ExitSuccess

on Ctrl-C, instead of exiting. How should I do it properly?

share|improve this question
up vote 17 down vote accepted

From the docs of installHandler:

a handler is installed which will invoke action in a new thread when (or shortly after) the signal is received.

and exitWith:

Note: in GHC, exitWith should be called from the main program thread in order to exit the process. When called from another thread, exitWith will throw an ExitException as normal, but the exception will not cause the process itself to exit.

So an exitSuccess handler doesn't end the process, and that's expected (although unexpected ;) behaviour.

If you want immediate action,

import System.Exit
import System.Posix.Signals
import Control.Concurrent

main :: IO ()
main = do
  tid <- myThreadId
  installHandler keyboardSignal (Catch (killThread tid)) Nothing
  threadDelay (1000000000)

kills the thread immediately upon receiving the signal.

Less drastic, if you want a successful exit, would be

import System.Exit
import System.Posix.Signals
import Control.Concurrent
import qualified Control.Exception as E

main :: IO ()
main = do
  tid <- myThreadId
  installHandler keyboardSignal (Catch (E.throwTo tid ExitSuccess)) Nothing
  threadDelay (10000000)

I think it will also work reliably, but I'm not entirely sure.

share|improve this answer
    
What does the line threadDelay (10000000) do? – Langston Nov 8 '15 at 9:24
1  
threadDelay "Suspends the current thread for a given number of microseconds", similar to usleep in C. Here, we suspend execution for the sole purpose of giving the user enough time to press Ctrl-C. – Daniel Fischer Nov 8 '15 at 10:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.