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Below recursive method sums the integer values between a range

  def sumInts(a: Int, b: Int): Int = {
    if(a > b) 0
    else {
      println(a +"," + b)
      a + sumInts(a + 1 , b)
    }
   } 

So sumInts(2 , 5) returns 14

I'm confused about how the recursive call to sumInts sums the integer range. Can explain textually how this method works ?

How does sumInts return the incremented value ?? Perhaps I am missing something fundamental to recursion here

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It calculates the sum of values in the range [a, b] by first calculating the sum of the range [a+1, b] (by recursively calling sumInts(a + 1 , b)) then adding a to it.

[Update] In Scala, the return statement is optional; functions return the value of the last expression evaluated. Thus the above function body is equivalent to

if(a > b) return 0
else {
  println(a +"," + b)
  return a + sumInts(a + 1 , b)
}

[/Update]

Which for the range [2, 5] it would do the following (I removed the println call for the sake of simplicity, and added brackets to mark recursive calls):

  1. if(2 > 5) 0 else 2 + sumInts(2 + 1, 5) which, the condition being false, evaluates to
  2. 2 + sumInts(3, 5)
  3. 2 + (if(3 > 5) 0 else 3 + sumInts(3 + 1, 5)) which evaluates to
  4. 2 + (3 + sumInts(4, 5))
  5. 2 + (3 + (if(4 > 5) 0 else 4 + sumInts(4 + 1, 5))) which evaluates to
  6. 2 + (3 + (4 + sumInts(5, 5)))
  7. 2 + (3 + (4 + (if(5 > 5) 0 else 5 + sumInts(5 + 1, 5)))) which evaluates to
  8. 2 + (3 + (4 + (5 + sumInts(6, 5))))
  9. 2 + (3 + (4 + (5 + (if(6 > 5) 0 else 6 + sumInts(6 + 1, 5))))) which, the condition being true, evaluates to
  10. 2 + (3 + (4 + (5 + (0))))
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thank you, please see question edit –  user701254 Nov 18 '12 at 16:41
    
@user701254, please see my update. –  Péter Török Nov 18 '12 at 16:44
    
thanks, the point I was missing also is that the 'a' variable is incremented on each subsequent call. –  user701254 Nov 18 '12 at 17:22
2  
be careful with this affirmation, the a is never actually "updated", it's more correct to say that for each recursive call, the method gets called with a different parameter value, but a stays the same during each recursion. –  pagoda_5b Nov 18 '12 at 22:31

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