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How can I generate random 8 character alphanumeric strings in C#?

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93  
@Jonas Elfstrom, So? Hopefully the next time it is googled it will lead to this page. –  KingNestor Aug 27 '09 at 23:13
2  
What restrictions if any do you have on the character set? Just English language characters and 0-9? Mixed case? –  Eric J. Aug 27 '09 at 23:15
8  
5  
Note that you should NOT use any method based on the Random class to generate passwords. The seeding of Random has very low entropy, so it's not really secure. Use a cryptographic PRNG for passwords. –  CodesInChaos Mar 9 '11 at 18:47
4  
@JonasElfström - Just googled this and it brought me to this page. –  xaisoft Sep 30 '13 at 14:05
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18 Answers 18

up vote 295 down vote accepted

I heard LINQ is the new black, so here's my attempt using LINQ:

var chars = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789";
var random = new Random();
var result = new string(
    Enumerable.Repeat(chars, 8)
              .Select(s => s[random.Next(s.Length)])
              .ToArray());

(Note: The use of the Random class makes this unsuitable for anything security related, such as creating passwords or tokens.
           Use the RNGCryptoServiceProvider class if you need a strong random number generator.)

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4  
Unique solution to a common question. I like +1 –  Spencer Ruport Aug 27 '09 at 23:16
25  
+1 Linq is definitely the new black :-) –  Tim Jarvis Aug 27 '09 at 23:18
10  
If Linq is the new black, is var the new dim? +1 btw, über elegant. –  Paul Sasik Aug 27 '09 at 23:33
6  
@Alex: I've run a few quick tests and it seems to scale pretty much linearly when generating longer strings (so long as there's actually enough memory available). Having said that, Dan Rigby's answer was almost twice as fast as this one in every test. –  LukeH Aug 28 '09 at 0:33
2  
This is brilliant. –  Phil Jan 6 '11 at 15:41
show 19 more comments
var chars = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
var stringChars = new char[8];
var random = new Random();

for (int i = 0; i < stringChars.Length; i++)
{
    stringChars[i] = chars[random.Next(chars.Length)];
}

var finalString = new String(stringChars);

Not as elegant as the Linq solution. (-:

(Note: The use of the Random class makes this unsuitable for anything security related, such as creating passwords or tokens. Use the RNGCryptoServiceProvider class if you need a strong random number generator.)

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10  
I think yours is better than Linq –  Barbaros Alp Aug 27 '09 at 23:25
4  
@Barbaros Alp: But it's soooo 20th century ;-) –  dtb Aug 27 '09 at 23:27
1  
I know i know :))) –  Barbaros Alp Aug 28 '09 at 0:00
1  
+1. According to Luke, the fastest answer :) –  Alex Aug 28 '09 at 0:35
4  
Nice answer, but what happened to "wxyz" ? :) –  Moe Sisko Aug 28 '09 at 6:28
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This implementation (found via google) looks sound to me:

using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.Text;

namespace UniqueKey
{
    public class KeyGenerator
    {
        public static string GetUniqueKey(int maxSize)
        {
            char[] chars = new char[62];
            chars =
            "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ1234567890".ToCharArray();
            byte[] data = new byte[1];
            RNGCryptoServiceProvider crypto = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
            crypto.GetNonZeroBytes(data);
            data = new byte[maxSize];
            crypto.GetNonZeroBytes(data);
            StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder(maxSize);
            foreach (byte b in data)
            {
                result.Append(chars[b % (chars.Length)]);
            }
            return result.ToString();
        }
    }
}

Picked that one from a discussion of alternatives here

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5  
This looks like the correct approach to me - random passwords, salts, entropy and so forth should not be generated using Random() which is optimized for speed and generates reproducible sequences of numbers; RNGCryptoServiceProvider.GetNonZeroBytes() on the other hand produces wild sequences of numbers that are NOT reproducible. –  mindplay.dk Apr 18 '11 at 20:09
3  
The letters are slightly biased(255 % 62 != 0). Despite this minor flaw, it is by far the best solution here. –  CodesInChaos Mar 17 '12 at 20:52
1  
The result will never contain 0 (use chars.Length instead of char.Length-1). –  CodesInChaos Mar 17 '12 at 20:54
    
Note that this is not sound if you want crypto-strength, unbiased randomness. (And if you don't want that then why use RNGCSP in the first place?) Using mod to index into the chars array means that you'll get biased output unless chars.Length happens to be a divisor of 256. –  LukeH Apr 3 '12 at 16:35
2  
One possibility to reduce the bias a lot, is requesting 4*maxSize random bytes, then use (UInt32)(BitConverter.ToInt32(data,4*i)% chars.Length. I'd also use GetBytes instead of GetNonZeroBytes. And finally you can remove the first call to GetNonZeroBytes. You're not using its result. –  CodesInChaos Apr 4 '12 at 8:19
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Why not just use a Guid?

Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Replace("-", string.Empty).Substring(0, 8);

Just tested with 100,000 iterations, generated only one duplicate.

Edit: Technically you do not need the call to .Replace. The dash comes after the first 8 characters in a Guid. I’m used to having to generate 16 char random numbers for a project I work on. Should be:

Guid.NewGuid().ToString().Substring(0, 8);

Edit 2: If you need to generate more then 8 characters, you can do what richardtallent mentions below and use "n" as the format value of the .ToString method, which removes the dashes:

Guid.NewGuid().ToString("n").Substring(0, numOfCharsNeeded);
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6  
You actually generated a duplicate? Surprising at 5,316,911,983,139,663,491,615,228,241,121,400,000 possible combinations of GUIDs. –  Alex Aug 28 '09 at 0:10
24  
@Alex: He's shortening the GUID to 8 characters, so the probability of collisions is much higher than that of GUIDs. –  dtb Aug 28 '09 at 0:19
4  
Nobody can appreciate this other than nerds :) Yes you are absolutely right, the 8 char limit makes a difference. –  Alex Aug 28 '09 at 0:36
14  
Guid.NewGuid().ToString("n") will keep the dashes out, no Replace() call needed. But it should be mentioned, GUIDs are only 0-9 and A-F. The number of combinations is "good enough," but nowhere close to what a true alphanumeric random string permits. The chances of collision are 1:4,294,967,296 -- the same as a random 32-bit integer. –  richardtallent Aug 28 '09 at 0:40
5  
1) GUIDs are designed to be unique, not random. While current versions of windows generate V4 GUIDs which are indeed random, that's not guaranteed. For example older versions of windows used V1 GUIDs, where your could would fail. 2) Just using hex characters reduces the quality of the random string significantly. From 47 to 32 bits. 3) People are underestimating the collision probability, since they give it for individual pairs. If you generate 100k 32 bit values, you probably have one collision among them. See Birthday problem. –  CodesInChaos Nov 16 '12 at 12:33
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Here's an example that I stole from Sam Allen example at Dot Net Perls

If you only need 8 characters, then use Path.GetRandomFileName() in the System.IO namespace. Sam says using the "Path.GetRandomFileName method here is sometimes superior, because it uses RNGCryptoServiceProvider for better randomness. However, it is limited to 11 random characters."

GetRandomFileName always returns a 12 character string with a period at the 9th character. So you'll need to strip the period (since that's not random) and then take 8 characters from the string. Actually, you could just take the first 8 characters and not worry about the period.

public string Get8CharacterRandomString()
{
    string path = Path.GetRandomFileName();
    path = path.Replace(".", ""); // Remove period.
    return path.Substring(0, 8);  // Return 8 character string
}

PS: thanks Sam

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A bit too clever for my tastes. I prefer the more straightforward approach. –  JohnFx Aug 28 '09 at 0:39
    
Won't work in medium trust. –  Raif Atef Dec 7 '11 at 3:40
1  
@RaifAtef: Can you please explain what you meant by "wont work in medium trust"? Thank you. –  Nanda Apr 10 '12 at 18:45
2  
I stand corrected, it seems that it doesn't require full trust. I misread it for Path.GetTempFileName() which calls into "Environment" methods which don't work on medium trust. Medium trust: stackoverflow.com/questions/2617454/… –  Raif Atef Apr 11 '12 at 13:45
3  
This works well. I ran it through 100,000 iterations and never had a duplicate name. However, I did find several vulgar words (in English). Wouldn't have even thought of this except one of the first ones in the list had F*** in it . Just a heads up if you use this for something the user will see. –  techturtle Oct 9 '12 at 22:35
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The main goals of my code are:

  1. The distribution of strings is almost uniform (don't care about minor deviations, as long as they're small)
  2. It outputs more than a few billion strings for each argument set. Generating an 8 character string (~47 bits of entropy) is meaningless if your PRNG only generates 2 billion (31 bits of entropy) different values.
  3. It's secure, since I expect people to use this for passwords or other security tokens.

The first property is achieved by taking a 64 bit value modulo the alphabet size. For small alphabets (such as the 62 characters from the question) this leads to negligible bias. The second and third property are achieved by using RNGCryptoServiceProvider instead of System.Random.

using System;
using System.Security.Cryptography;

public static string GetRandomAlphanumericString(int length)
{
    const string alphanumericCharacters =
        "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ" +
        "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz" +
        "0123456789";
    return GetRandomString(length, alphanumericCharacters);
}

public static string GetRandomString(int length, IEnumerable<char> characterSet)
{
    if (length < 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("length must not be negative", "length");
    if (length > int.MaxValue / 8) // 250 million chars ought to be enough for anybody
        throw new ArgumentException("length is too big", "length");
    if (characterSet == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("characterSet");
    var characterArray = characterSet.Distinct().ToArray();
    if (characterArray.Length == 0)
        throw new ArgumentException("characterSet must not be empty", "characterSet");

    var bytes = new byte[length * 8];
    new RNGCryptoServiceProvider().GetBytes(bytes);
    var result = new char[length];
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
    {
        ulong value = BitConverter.ToUInt64(bytes, i * 8);
        result[i] = characterArray[value % (uint)characterArray.Length];
    }
    return new string(result);
}
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The simplest:

public static string GetRandomAlphaNumeric()
{
    return Path.GetRandomFileName().Replace(".", "").Substring(0, 8);
}

You can get better performance if you hard code the char array and rely on System.Random:

public static string GetRandomAlphaNumeric()
{
    var chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";
    return new string(chars.Select(c => chars[random.Next(chars.Length)]).Take(8).ToArray());
}

If ever you worry the English alphabets can change sometime around and you might lose business, then you can avoid hard coding, but should perform slightly worse (comparable to Path.GetRandomFileName approach)

public static string GetRandomAlphaNumeric()
{
    var chars = 'a'.To('z').Concat('0'.To('9')).ToList();
    return new string(chars.Select(c => chars[random.Next(chars.Length)]).Take(8).ToArray());
}

public static IEnumerable<char> To(this char start, char end)
{
    if (end < start)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("the end char should not be less than start char", innerException: null);
    return Enumerable.Range(start, end - start + 1).Select(i => (char)i);
}

The last two approaches looks better if you can make them an extension method on System.Random instance.

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6  
+1 for the English alphabet changing joke –  Bern Jun 13 '13 at 14:43
    
Using chars.Select is a big ugly since it relies on the output size being at most the alphabet size. –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 at 10:09
    
@CodesInChaos I'm not sure if I understand you. You mean in the 'a'.To('z') approach? –  nawfal Jun 4 at 10:18
    
1) chars.Select().Take(n)` only works if chars.Count >= n. Selecting on a sequence you don't actually use is a bit unintuitive, especially with that implicit length constraint. I'd rather use Enumerable.Range or Enumerable.Repeat. 2) The error message "the end char should be less than start char" is the wrong way round/missing a not. –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 at 10:20
    
@CodesInChaos but in my case chars.Count is way > n. Also I dont get the unintuitive part. That does make all uses Take unintuitive doesnt it? I dont believe it. Thanks for pointing the typo. –  nawfal Jun 4 at 10:34
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Just some performance comparisons of the various answers in this thread:

Methods & Setup

// what's available
public static string possibleChars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
// optimized (?) what's available
public static char[] possibleCharsArray = possibleChars.ToCharArray();
// optimized (precalculated) count
public static int possibleCharsAvailable = possibleChars.Length;
// shared randomization thingy
public static Random random = new Random();


// http://stackoverflow.com/a/1344242/1037948
public string LinqIsTheNewBlack(int num) {
    return new string(
    Enumerable.Repeat(possibleCharsArray, num)
              .Select(s => s[random.Next(s.Length)])
              .ToArray());
}

// http://stackoverflow.com/a/1344258/1037948
public string ForLoop(int num) {
    var result = new char[num];
    while(num-- > 0) {
        result[num] = possibleCharsArray[random.Next(possibleCharsAvailable)];
    }
    return new string(result);
}

public string ForLoopNonOptimized(int num) {
    var result = new char[num];
    while(num-- > 0) {
        result[num] = possibleChars[random.Next(possibleChars.Length)];
    }
    return new string(result);
}

public string Repeat(int num) {
    return new string(new char[num].Select(o => possibleCharsArray[random.Next(possibleCharsAvailable)]).ToArray());
}

// http://stackoverflow.com/a/1518495/1037948
public string GenerateRandomString(int num) {
  var rBytes = new byte[num];
  random.NextBytes(rBytes);
  var rName = new char[num];
  while(num-- > 0)
    rName[num] = possibleCharsArray[rBytes[num] % possibleCharsAvailable];
  return new string(rName);
}

Results

Tested in LinqPad. For string size of 10, generates:

  • from Linq = chdgmevhcy [10]
  • from Loop = gtnoaryhxr [10]
  • from Select = rsndbztyby [10]
  • from GenerateRandomString = owyefjjakj [10]

And the performance numbers tend to vary slightly, very occasionally NonOptimized is actually faster, and sometimes ForLoop and GenerateRandomString switch who's in the lead.

  • LinqIsTheNewBlack (10000x) = 96762 ticks elapsed (9.6762 ms)
  • ForLoop (10000x) = 28970 ticks elapsed (2.897 ms)
  • ForLoopNonOptimized (10000x) = 33336 ticks elapsed (3.3336 ms)
  • Repeat (10000x) = 78547 ticks elapsed (7.8547 ms)
  • GenerateRandomString (10000x) = 27416 ticks elapsed (2.7416 ms)
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1  
Would be interesting to know which ones created dupes. –  Junto Aug 1 '13 at 12:43
    
@Junto -- to figure out which results in duplicates, something like var many = 10000; Assert.AreEqual(many, new bool[many].Select(o => EachRandomizingMethod(10)).Distinct().Count());, where you replace EachRandomizingMethod with...each method –  drzaus Sep 11 '13 at 17:06
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If you just need a pseudo-random alphanumeric code, that is user friendly, and derived from an integer value, I have provided a solution here:

Generating pseudo-random alphanumeric values

It has the advantage that each key generated is guaranteed to be unique.

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1  
Thanks mate! I guess while your post might not answer the OP's question (the part about 8 characters), this is a very good alternative. My only suggestion would be to post the source code in your answer or at least host it in a github gist or in a github repo or something. If for whatever reason you change your domain name or move stuff around, this really useful piece of code will be lost! –  Amith George Jul 16 '13 at 10:13
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Another option could be to use Linq and aggregate random chars into a stringbuilder.

var chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz123456789".ToArray();
string pw = Enumerable.Range(0, passwordLength)
                      .Aggregate(
                          new StringBuilder(),
                          (sb, n) => sb.Append((chars[random.Next(chars.Length)])),
                          sb => sb.ToString());
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Horrible, I know, but I just couldn't help myself:


namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    using System;
    using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Random adomRng = new Random();
            string rndString = string.Empty;
            char c;

            for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++)
            {
                while (!Regex.IsMatch((c=Convert.ToChar(adomRng.Next(48,128))).ToString(), "[A-Za-z0-9]"));
                rndString += c;
            }

            Console.WriteLine(rndString + Environment.NewLine);
        }
    }
}

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  1. If you don't need a cryptographically random generator
  2. If you know the length of the output, you don't need a StringBuilder, and when using ToCharArray, this creates and fills the array (you don't need to create an empty array first)
  3. You should use NextBytes, rather than getting one at a time for performance
  4. Technically you could pin the byte array for faster access.. it's usually worth it when your iterating more than 6-8 times over a byte array.
  5. Define your character set and Random gen object once.
  6. My example has a 62 char set and 32 char output
  7. Clearly, you can adjust this example, to accept the string length as a param.

    private static char[] charSet =
      "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789".ToCharArray();
    
    
    private static Random rGen = new Random();
    public string GenerateRandomString()
    {
      byte[] rBytes = new byte[32];
      rGen.NextBytes(rBytes);
      char[] rName = new char[32];
      for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++)
        rName[i] = charSet[rBytes[i] % 62];
      return rName.ToString();
    }
    
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I found some slight performance enhancements to your method, which seemed the fasted of the bunch -- stackoverflow.com/a/17092645/1037948 –  drzaus Jun 13 '13 at 16:46
1  
1) Why all those magic constants? You specified the output length three times. Just define it as a constant or a parameter. You can use charSet.Length instead of 62. 2) A static Random without locking means this code is not threadsafe. 3) reducing 0-255 mod 62 introduces a detectable bias. 4) You can't use ToString on a char array, that always returns "System.Char[]". You need to use new String(rName) instead. –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 at 10:04
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Membership.GeneratePassword does the trick :)

More info here

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If your values are not completely random, but in fact may depend on something - you may compute an md5 or sha1 hash of that 'somwthing' and then truncate it to whatever length you want.

Also you may generate and truncate a guid.

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public static class StringHelper
{
    private static readonly Random random = new Random();

    private const int randomSymbolsDefaultCount = 8;
    private const string availableChars = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789";

    private static int randomSymbolsIndex = 0;

    public static string GetRandomSymbols()
    {
        return GetRandomSymbols(randomSymbolsDefaultCount);
    }

    public static string GetRandomSymbols(int count)
    {
        var index = randomSymbolsIndex;
        var result = new string(
            Enumerable.Repeat(availableChars, count)
                      .Select(s => {
                          index += random.Next(s.Length);
                          if (index >= s.Length)
                              index -= s.Length;
                          return s[index];
                      })
                      .ToArray());
        randomSymbolsIndex = index;
        return result;
    }
}
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1) static methods should be thread safe. 2) What's the point of incrementing the index instead of using the result of random.Next directly? Complicates the code and doesn't achieve anything useful. –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 at 10:01
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My method:

    public string GetRandomAlphanumericString(int strLength)
    {
        var rand = new Random();

        StringBuilder strBuilder = new StringBuilder();

        for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++)
        {
            var n = rand.Next(0, 3);
            if (n == 0)
            {
                strBuilder.Append((char) rand.Next(65, 65 + 26));
            }
            else if (n == 1)
            {
                strBuilder.Append((char) rand.Next(97, 97 + 26));
            }
            else
            {
                strBuilder.Append((char) rand.Next(49, 49 + 9));
            }
        }

        return strBuilder.ToString();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
1) Call this twice is succession. Surprise, surprise the random strings are the same. 2) This is pretty biased. Each number is more than twice as common as each letter. 3) why write the lower bounds as numbers instead of character literals like 'A'? –  CodesInChaos Jun 4 at 9:55
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We also use custom string random but we implemented is as a string's helper so it provides some flexibility...

public static string Random(this string chars, int length = 8)
{
    var randomString = new StringBuilder();
    var random = new Random();

    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        randomString.Append(chars[random.Next(chars.Length)]);

    return randomString.ToString();
}

Usage

var random = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ".Random();

or

var random = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789".Random(16);
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I know this one is not the best way. But you can try this.

string str = Path.GetRandomFileName(); //This method returns a random file name of 11 characters
str = str.Replace(".","");
Console.WriteLine("Random string: " + str);
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