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I have to create class with String and int fields. Constructor without arguments have to initialize: empty string and 0 value for int. addChar(char) method should let program to add new chars to string(name). toString() method should return this string and length() method have to show number of this chars. I tried something like this:

public class Word {

String name;
int number;

public Word() {

    name = "";
    number = 0;

}

public char addChar() {
  return ;
}

public String toString() {
  System.out.println(name); 
}

public int length() {
  return name.length();
  System.out.println (name.length());
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

}
}

But really dont know how to write method which could add one char to String (there's error) and how to write program that could use these methods to show it all works. Thanks

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It took a litle bit of refactoring, but here you go:

public class Word {

private String name;
private int number;

public Word() {
    name = "";
}

public void addChar(char ch) {
  name += ch;
  number++;
}

public String toString() {
  return name; 
}

public int length() {
  return number;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Word myWord = new Word();
    myWord.addChar('H');
    System.out.println(myWord);
    myWord.addChar('e');
    myWord.addChar('l');
    myWord.addChar('l');
    myWord.addChar('o');
    System.out.println(myWord);
    System.out.println(myWord.length());

}
}

result:

H
Hello
5

Changes:

  • method toString does return name.
  • method length does return number.
  • I added a small proof of concept in the main method.
  • I implmented the addChar and changed the return type to void.
  • I changed the Datatype of name to StringBuilder.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Yes, I know it would be better but unfortunately excercise require int field :/ –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:25
    
What is the requirement for the int field? is it the length? i can adapt the code to do that. –  Frank Nov 18 '12 at 17:26
    
I guess it is. Empty string(String) = 0(int), more chars in string - number raise. –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:32
    
i adapted the class. –  Frank Nov 18 '12 at 17:35
    
Is there any way to this without using StringBuilder method? I mean, to create constructor which initialize fields by empty string and 0? –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:50

- A String is Immutable, so you can't change it, when ever you try to change a String actually a new String Object is created on the heap.

- Its better to use StringBuilder or StringBuffer which are Mutable.

- StringBuilder came into existence from Java 5, which is Not Thread-Safe, where as StringBuffer exists before the arrival of StringBuilder, but its Thread-Safe.

//////////////////////Edited Part///////////////////////

Try it this way..........................

public class Word {

StringBuilder name = new StringBuilder();
int number;        // Class variable are already intialized to its initial value,
                   // in the case of int its 0.


                  // String already has an overridden toString method, so its not needed

public void addChar(String s) {

    name.append(s);
}


public String getString(){

    return name.toString();
}

public static void main(String[] args) {

    Word w = new Word();

    System.out.println(w.getString().length());
    w.addChar("hello");
    System.out.println(w.getString().length());
    w.addChar("Hi");
    System.out.println(w.getString().length());
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is it good to use it while I'm beginner? –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:16
    
@Fastkowy please see my edited answer,i have posted the code, and yes its important to know the basics at the very beginning, cause that will help you to write better codes.... Thats why i gave the theory at the beginning..... –  Kumar Vivek Mitra Nov 18 '12 at 17:20
    
I will keep it in mind :)This excercise doesn't require StringBuilder but now I see it's a better way to solve this. Thanks! –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:38

Your code will not compile for at least 2 problems: -

  1. Your toString method is not really returning anything. Rather it is printing your string. Change your method body to return your name.

  2. In your length method, you have unreachable code. You have a sysout statement after return statement that will never be executed.


Now, first you need to solve the above issues.

Then in addChar method, you actually need to pass a char as parameter to add to your string. You are missing it. Also, you don't really need to return the char that you just added. So char return type is not needed. Just void will be OK. As you already have a toString method to get your modified string back.

So, your addChar should look like: -

public void addChar(char ch) {
    name += ch;
}

And your modified toString and length method should be like this: -

public String toString() {
    return name; 
}

public int length() {
    return name.length();
}

Rest are all unchanged.

share|improve this answer
    
You could just do name += ch. –  arshajii Nov 18 '12 at 17:33
    
@A.R.S... Yeah you are right. Edited :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 18 '12 at 17:34

I fixed up some of your code for you.

Notes:

this("", 0) calls the constructor that accepts a String and int.

addChar should return nothing and just add on the character.

toString just returns a string.

Code:

public class Word {
    String name;
    int number;

    public Word() {
        this("", 0);
    }

    public Word(String s) {
        this(s, 0);
    }

    public Word(String s, int i) {
        name = s;
        number = i;
    }

    public void addChar(char c) {
        name += Character.toString(c);
    }

    public String toString() {
        return name;
    }

    public int length() {
        return name.length();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        //do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It works, but could you explain me where are <code>Character</code> (before .toString(c)) come from? –  Fastkowy Nov 18 '12 at 17:21
    
Its a wrapper class for char. similar to Integer and Float and other wrapper class. Google it, you will get the docs to see. –  Rohit Jain Nov 18 '12 at 17:24

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